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Author Fotios, S.; Monteiro, A.L.; Uttley, J.
Title Evaluation of pedestrian reassurance gained by higher illuminances in residential streets using the day–dark approach Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Lighting Research & Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research & Technology
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords (down) Vision; Psychology; Security
Abstract A field study was conducted to investigate how changes in the illuminance affect pedestrian reassurance when walking after dark in an urban location. The field study was conducted in daytime and after dark in order to employ the day–dark approach to analysis of optimal lighting. The results suggest that minimum illuminance is a better predictor of reassurance than is mean illuminance. For a day–dark difference of 0.5 units on a 6-point response scale, the results suggest a minimum horizontal illuminance of approximately 2.0 lux.
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ISSN 1477-1535 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2159
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Author Van der Westhuyzen, J.G.J., Leuschner, F.W.
Title The effect of age on white light perception Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication International Journal of Sustainable Lighting Abbreviated Journal
Volume 20 Issue 2 Pages 29-43
Keywords (down) Vision; Psychology
Abstract The way that persons from different age groups experience “white light” is investigated. Human eye lens transmission changes spectrally with age and this may influence the way that humans from different ages experiences light. Such a difference may be important in industrial and medical environments. Two different age groups, one group younger than 40 years of age and another group older than 50 years of age were subjected to the same “white” definition task.A conventional single-booth setup was used where observers were able to adjust the intensity of four coloured LED’s.Results of the psychophysical test procedure were used to generate specifications of two light sources, as selected by the two age groups. The two age groups selected different light sources when tasked to achieve a “perception” of white. Results show that the older group prefers a source with a colour rendering index number of 89 and the younger group prefers a source with a colour rendering index number of 74. The sources selectedby the two age groups specifycorrelated colour temperature values of 5150 K for the older age group and 6592 K for the younger group.
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Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2065
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Author Gould, G.M.
Title A hitherto undescribed visual phenomenon Type Journal Article
Year 1903 Publication Science Abbreviated Journal
Volume 18 Issue Pages 536-537
Keywords (down) Vision; Psychology
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Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2408
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Author Ciocca, M.; Wang, J.
Title By the light of the silvery Moon: fact and fiction Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Physics Education Abbreviated Journal Phys. Educ.
Volume 48 Issue 3 Pages 360-367
Keywords (down) Vision; moonlight; Purkinje effect; Purkinje shift; mesopic
Abstract Is moonlight 'silver' or 'cold'? In this paper we discuss the interesting combination of factors that contribute to the common descriptions of moonlight. Sunlight is reflected from the lunar surface and red-shifted. When traversing the atmosphere, moonlight is further depleted of short wavelength content by Rayleigh scattering. We measured the spectra of the moonlight to show these effects and compared them with sunlight. All measurements, including spectral reflectance, suggest that moonlight is redder than sunlight. The silvery Moon is just an illusion due to the properties and behaviour of our own eyes, including the responses of rods and cones and the physiological perceptive phenomenon called Purkinje shift.
Address Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond, KY, USA E-mail: marco.ciocca(at)eku.edu
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Publisher IOP Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
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ISSN 0031-9120 ISBN Medium
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Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2227
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Author Saraiji, R,; Oommen, M.S.
Title Dominant contrast as a metric for the lighting of pedestrians Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Lighting Research and Technology Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords (down) Vision; Lighting; Public Safety
Abstract CIE Publication 115 and ANSI/IESNA Recommended Practice 8-00 both use vertical illuminance 1.5 m above the ground as a design criterion for the lighting of pedestrians. While vertical illuminance has the advantage of being easy to calculate and measure, visibility is based primarily on target contrast. A central question related to the visibility of pedestrians is whether drivers need to see the whole pedestrian or can they infer the presence of a pedestrian by recognizing any part of the pedestrian’s shape. The objective of this work was to first explore various pedestrian contrast profiles that could exist and then to find a simplified approach to characterize pedestrian night-time visibility. The problem was addressed through theoretical analyses and computer simulations. Pedestrian contrast was found to be bipolar and dynamic. From the contrast profiles, we developed the concept of dominant contrast, which is defined as the contrast of any part of the pedestrian that provides the highest visibility. Dominant contrast was examined as a metric for street lighting design and night time visibility for (a) an unlit street with car headlights, (b) a lit street without car headlights and (c) a lit street with car headlights. Dominant contrast was found to be a viable metric for street lighting design and night time visibility studies.
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Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 854
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