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Author Bortle, J.E.
Title Introducing the Bortle Dark-Sky Scale. Type Journal Article
Year 2001 Publication Sky & Telescope Abbreviated Journal Sky Telesc
Volume Issue 60 Pages 126-129
Keywords (down) Vision; skyglow; visibility; sky brightness
Abstract How dark is your sky? The relationship between light pollution and astronomy is a concern amateurs and professional astronomers alike. Are your skies dark enough? A precise answer to this question is useful for comparing observing sites and, more important, for determining whether a site is dark enough to let you push your eyes, telescope, or camera to their theoretical limits. Likewise, you need accurate criteria for judging sky conditions when documenting unusual or borderline observations, such as an extremely long comet tail, a faint aurora, or subtle features in galaxies.
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Publisher Sky Publishing Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0037-6604 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @; IDA @ john @ Serial 556
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Author Bennett, M.G.
Title The visual range of lights at night, and its relation to the visual range of ordinary objects by day. Type Journal Article
Year 1932 Publication Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society Abbreviated Journal QJ Roy. Met. Soc
Volume 58 Issue Pages 259-271
Keywords (down) Vision; Skyglow
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2414
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Author Ostrin, L.A.
Title Ocular and systemic melatonin and the influence of light exposure Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Clinical & Experimental Optometry Abbreviated Journal Clin Exp Optom
Volume in press Issue Pages in press
Keywords (down) Vision; Review; Human Health
Abstract Melatonin is a neurohormone known to modulate a wide range of circadian functions, including sleep. The synthesis and release of melatonin from the pineal gland is heavily influenced by light stimulation of the retina, particularly through the intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells. Melatonin is also synthesised within the eye, although to a much lesser extent than in the pineal gland. Melatonin acts directly on ocular structures to mediate a variety of diurnal rhythms and physiological processes within the eye. The interactions between melatonin, the eye, and visual function have been the subject of a considerable body of recent research. This review is intended to provide a broad introduction for eye-care practitioners and researchers to the topic of melatonin and the eye. The first half of the review describes the anatomy and physiology of melatonin production: how visual inputs affect the pineal production of melatonin; how melatonin is involved in a variety of diurnal rhythms within the eye, including photoreceptor disc shedding, neuronal sensitivity, and intraocular pressure control; and melatonin production and physiological roles in retina, ciliary body, lens and cornea. The second half of the review describes clinical implications of light/melatonin interactions. These include light exposure and photoreceptor contributions in melatonin suppression, leading to consideration of how blue blockers, cataract, and light therapy might affect sleep and mood in patients. Additionally, the interactions between melatonin, sleep and refractive error development are discussed. A better understanding of environmental factors that affect melatonin and subsequent effects on physiological processes will allow clinicians to develop treatments and recommend modifiable behaviours to improve sleep, increase daytime alertness, and regulate ocular and systemic processes related to melatonin.
Address University of Houston College of Optometry, Houston, Texas, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0816-4622 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30074278 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1986
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Author Rea, M.
Title The what and the where of vision lighting research Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Lighting Research & Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research & Technology
Volume 50 Issue 1 Pages 14-37
Keywords (down) Vision; Review
Abstract Vision neuroscience research and vision lighting research have historically run on parallel paths. The former discipline is primarily interested in understanding the basic neurophysiological and biophysical characteristics of the visual system, while the latter is primarily interested in understanding the best means for designing and engineering perceptions of architectural spaces and for improving safety and productivity of indoor and outdoor applications. This review frames vision lighting research conducted over the past century in terms of current vision neuroscience research, illustrating the similarities in the two research paths. It is also argued that visual lighting research could be more impactful on society at large if the basic framework established by vision neuroscience were considered in planning and conducting applications research. Specifically, studies aimed at understanding the luminous environment in terms of the what and the where of visual subsystems would provide the foundation for developing unique and highly valuable lighting applications and standards.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1477-1535 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1956
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Author S Fotios, C Cheal, S Fox,
Title The transition between lit and unlit sections of road and detection of driving hazards after dark Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Lighting Research & Technology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 51 Issue 2 Pages 243-261
Keywords (down) Vision; Public Safety; Lighting; Planning
Abstract An experiment to investigate peripheral detection performance during a driver’s transition between lit and unlit sections of road was undertaken. The results suggest that when a driver moves from a lit to an unlit section of road their detection performance decreases almost immediately to that expected for the conditions of the unlit section and that there is no significant change in the subsequent 20-minute period. Tests were conducted at three luminances (0.1, 1.0 and 2.0 cd/m2): while an increase from 0.1 to 1.0 cd/m2 improved detection, a further increase to 2.0 cd/m2 did not. Lighting of two S/P ratios (0.65, 1.40) was examined at 1.0 cd/m2: this did not suggest an effect on detection performance. Taken together, these results suggest that, in the current context, visual performance reached a plateau at 1.0 cd/m2.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @; GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1769
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