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Author Stone, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Re-envisioning the Nocturnal Sublime: On the Ethics and Aesthetics of Nighttime Lighting Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Topoi Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume In press Issue Pages  
  Keywords (down) Society  
  Abstract Grounded in the practical problem of light pollution, this paper examines the aesthetic dimensions of urban and natural darkness, and its impact on how we perceive and evaluate nighttime lighting. It is argued that competing notions of the sublime, manifested through artificial illumination and the natural night sky respectively, reinforce a geographical dualism between cities and wilderness. To challenge this spatial differentiation, recent work in urban-focused environmental ethics, as well as environmental aesthetics, are utilized to envision the moral and aesthetic possibilities of a new urban nocturnal sublime. Through articulating the aspirations and constraints of a new urban nocturnal experience, this paper elucidates the axiological dimensions of light pollution, draws attention to nightscapes as a site of importance for urban-focused (environmental) philosophy, and examines the enduring relevance of the sublime for both the design of nighttime illumination and the appreciation of the night sky.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2098  
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Author Stone, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light Pollution: A Case Study in Framing an Environmental Problem Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Ethics, Policy & Environment Abbreviated Journal Ethics, Policy & Environment  
  Volume 20 Issue 3 Pages 279-293  
  Keywords (down) Society  
  Abstract Light pollution is a topic gaining importance and acceptance in environmental discourse. This concept provides a framework for categorizing the adverse effects of nighttime lighting, which advocacy groups and regulatory efforts are increasingly utilizing. However, the ethical significance of the concept has, thus far, received little critical reflection. In this paper, I analyze the moral implications of framing issues in nighttime lighting via the concept of light pollution. First, the moral and political importance of problem framing is discussed. Next, the origins and contemporary understandings of light pollution are presented. Finally, the normative limitations and practical ambiguities of light pollution are discussed, with the aim of strengthening the framework through which decisions about urban nighttime lighting strategies are increasingly approached.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2155-0085 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2226  
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Author Sloane, M.; Slater, D.; Entwistle, J. openurl 
  Title Tackling Social Inequalities in Public Lighting Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords (down) Society  
  Abstract 2This report is based on research findings of the Configuring Light/Staging the Social research programme (CL) based at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), as well as on discussions of the Configuring Light expert working group. Consisting of high-profile experts and stakeholders in the fields of design, planning and policy-making, this group was established by CL to develop a new agenda for tackling social inequalities in public lighting. Members of the working group are listed at the end of this document.This project was run by the LSE-based Configuring Light/Staging the Social research programme and funded by LSE Knowledge Exchange and Impact funding.  
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  Corporate Author London School of Economics Thesis  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2528  
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Author Elvidge, C.; Zhizhin, M.; Hsu, F.-C.; Baugh, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title VIIRS Nightfire: Satellite Pyrometry at Night Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing  
  Volume 5 Issue 9 Pages 4423-4449  
  Keywords (down) SNPP; VIIRS; fire detection; gas flaring; biomass burning; fossil fuel carbon emissions  
  Abstract The Nightfire algorithm detects and characterizes sub-pixel hot sources using multispectral data collected globally, each night, by the Suomi National Polar Partnership (NPP) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS). The spectral bands utilized span visible, near-infrared (NIR), short-wave infrared (SWIR), and mid-wave infrared (MWIR). The primary detection band is in the SWIR, centered at 1.6 μm. Without solar input, the SWIR spectral band records sensor noise, punctuated by high radiant emissions associated with gas flares, biomass burning, volcanoes, and industrial sites such as steel mills. Planck curve fitting of the hot source radiances yields temperature (K) and emission scaling factor (ESF). Additional calculations are done to estimate source size (m2), radiant heat intensity (W/m2), and radiant heat (MW). Use of the sensor noise limited M7, M8, and M10 spectral bands at night reduce scene background effects, which are widely reported for fire algorithms based on MWIR and long-wave infrared. High atmospheric transmissivity in the M10 spectral band reduces atmospheric effects on temperature and radiant heat retrievals. Nightfire retrieved temperature estimates for sub-pixel hot sources ranging from 600 to 6,000 K. An intercomparison study of biomass burning in Sumatra from June 2013 found Nightfire radiant heat (MW) to be highly correlated to Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) Fire Radiative Power (MW).  
  Address Earth Observation Group, NOAA National Geophysical Data Center, Boulder, CO 80305, USA  
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  ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 199  
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Author Fulop, P.; Hanuliak, P.; Mankova, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Case Study of Light Pollution in Urbanized Area of Slovakia Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Advanced Materials Research Abbreviated Journal Amr  
  Volume 899 Issue Pages 277-282  
  Keywords (down) Slovakia; light pollution; light at night; public policy  
  Abstract This paper deals with the problem of light pollution and its potential impact on human body. Loss of darkness during the night has a negative effect on the environment, animals, plants and humans. Concerning humans, the light during the night can lead to desynchronization of circadian rhythms with subsequent lower production of sleeping hormone called melatonin. In addition to the negative impact on organisms, there is also economical effect of wastage of lighting during the night. Pollution caused by the occurrence of light during the night is relatively new term, which has been perceived very roughly so far. That is probably the reason, why Slovak legislation deals with this problem very roughly. Some limitation levels of illuminance of billboards were stated, but the legislation doesn ́t deal with the effect of the occurrence of higly influential light during the night on people at their homes.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1662-8985 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 325  
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