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Author Fotios, S.; Yao, Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The association between correlated colour temperature and scotopic/photopic ratio Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Lighting Research & Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research & Technology  
  Volume 35 Issue 10 Pages 1365-1374  
  Keywords (down) Vision; Lighting  
  Abstract The scotopic/photopic ratio (S/P) is a parameter that may be considered in the design of road lighting. This paper compares the S/P ratio and correlated colour temperature (CCT) for 297 light source spectra identified in IES Technical Memorandum TM-30-15 to test the assumption that higher S/P ratios demand higher CCTs. The results suggest that, for a given lamp type, there is a strong association between S/P ratio and CCT, and hence that for a given CCT only a small variation in S/P ratio is available. However, the results also suggest that a larger variation in S/P ratio is possible if the lighting designer is able to consider a change in lamp type.  
  Address  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1477-1535 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1954  
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Author Huang, Z.; Liu, Q.; Westland, S.; Pointer, M.; Luo, M.R.; Xiao, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light dominates colour preference when correlated colour temperature differs Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Lighting Research & Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research & Technology  
  Volume 50 Issue 7 Pages 995-1012  
  Keywords (down) Vision; Lighting  
  Abstract Colour preference for lighting is generally influenced by three kinds of contextual factors, the light, the object and the observer. In this study, a series of psychophysical experiments were conducted to investigate and compare the effect of certain factors on colour preference, including spectral power distribution of light, lighting application, observers’ personal colour preference, regional cultural difference and gender difference. LED lights with different correlated colour temperatures were used to illuminate a wide selection of objects. Participant response was quantified by a 7-point rating method or a 5-level ranking method. It was found that the preferred illumination for different objects exhibited a similar trend and that the influence of light was significantly stronger than that of other factors. Therefore, we conclude that the light itself (rather than, e.g. the objects that are viewed) is the most crucial factor for predicting which light, among several candidates with different correlated colour temperatures, an observer will prefer. In addition, some of the gamut-based colour quality metrics correlated well with the participants’ response, which corroborates the view that colour preference is strongly influenced by colour saturation. The familiarity of the object affects the ratings for each experiment while the colour of the objects also influences colour preference.  
  Address School of Printing and Packaging, Wuhan University, Luoyu Road 129, Wuhan, China; liuqiang(at)whu.edu.cn  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher SAGE Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1477-1535 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2256  
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Author Downey, J.W. url  openurl
  Title Determination of minimum light sense and retinal dark adaptation with presentation of a new type of photometer Type Journal Article
  Year 1919 Publication American Journal of Ophthalmology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 2 Issue 1 Pages 13-20  
  Keywords (down) Vision; Instrumentation  
  Abstract This paper reviews the principal hypotheses with reference to light and dark adaptation, and suggests a practical photometer, using a radioactive substance as a standard of comparison. With three illustrations, and experimental findings with this instrument.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2418  
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Author Bullough, J.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Spectral Sensitivity Modeling and Nighttime Scene Brightness Perception Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Leukos Abbreviated Journal Leukos  
  Volume 11 Issue 1 Pages 11-17  
  Keywords (down) Vision; human vision; Melanopsin; Outdoor Lighting; Scene brightness; Spectral sensitivity; visual psychophysics  
  Abstract Brightness perception under different light sources is an important visual response, because it is related to perceptions of safety. A growing number of studies have been conducted to assess perceptions of scene brightness under light sources differing in spectral content, including results consistent with a role of melanopsin-containing, intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells in scene brightness. Data from recent studies of scene brightness perception at light levels experienced under nighttime driving conditions are used to compare different models of brightness perception. The data support a role of increased short-wavelength sensitivity for scene brightness perception and a provisional spectral sensitivity model that takes into account the possible influence of melanopsin-containing, intrinsically photoreceptive retinal ganglion cells is suggested as a basis for further investigation. The implications of such a model on brightness perception under several light sources used in transportation lighting are described.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1550-2724 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1073  
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Author Nickla, D.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Ocular diurnal rhythms and eye growth regulation: where we are 50 years after Lauber Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Experimental eye Research Abbreviated Journal Exp Eye Res  
  Volume 114 Issue Pages 25-34  
  Keywords (down) Vision; Human Health; Review  
  Abstract Many ocular processes show diurnal oscillations that optimize retinal function under the different conditions of ambient illumination encountered over the course of the 24 h light/dark cycle. Abolishing the diurnal cues by the use of constant darkness or constant light results in excessive ocular elongation, corneal flattening, and attendant refractive errors. A prevailing hypothesis is that the absence of the Zeitgeber of light and dark alters ocular circadian rhythms in some manner, and results in an inability of the eye to regulate its growth in order to achieve emmetropia, the matching of the front optics to eye length. Another visual manipulation that results in the eye growth system going into a “default” mode of excessive growth is form deprivation, in which a translucent diffuser deprives the eye of visual transients (spatial or temporal) while not significantly reducing light levels; these eyes rapidly elongate and become myopic. It has been hypothesized that form deprivation might constitute a type of “constant condition” whereby the absence of visual transients drives the eye into a similar default mode as that in response to constant light or dark. Interest in the potential influence of light cycles and ambient lighting in human myopia development has been spurred by a recent study showing a positive association between the amount of time that children spent outdoors and a reduced prevalence of myopia. The growing eyes of chickens and monkeys show a diurnal rhythm in axial length: Eyes elongate more during the day than during the night. There is also a rhythm in choroidal thickness that is in approximate anti-phase to the rhythm in eye length. The phases are altered in eyes growing too fast, in response to form deprivation or negative lenses, or too slowly, in response to myopic defocus, suggesting an influence of phase on the emmetropization system. Other potential rhythmic influences include dopamine and melatonin, which form a reciprocal feedback loop, and signal “day” and “night” respectively. Retinal dopamine is reduced during the day in form deprived myopic eyes, and dopamine D2 agonists inhibit ocular growth in animal models. Rhythms in intraocular pressure as well, may influence eye growth, perhaps as a mechanical stimulus triggering changes in scleral extracellular matrix synthesis. Finally, evidence shows varying influences of environmental lighting parameters on the emmetropization system, such as high intensity light being protective against myopia in chickens. This review will cover the evidence for the possible influence of these various factors on ocular growth. The recognition that ocular rhythms may play a role in emmetropization is a first step toward understanding how they may be manipulated in treatment therapies to prevent myopia in humans.  
  Address New England College of Optometry, Department of Biosciences, 424 Beacon Street, Boston, MA 02115, USA. nicklad@neco.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0014-4835 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23298452; PMCID:PMC3742730 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1987  
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