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Author Muheim, R.; Phillips, J.B.; Akesson, S.
Title Polarized light cues underlie compass calibration in migratory songbirds Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication Science (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Science
Volume 313 Issue 5788 Pages 837-839
Keywords (up) Alaska; *Animal Migration; Animals; Calibration; Cues; *Flight, Animal; Geography; *Light; Magnetics; *Orientation; Seasons; Sparrows/*physiology; Sunlight
Abstract Migratory songbirds use the geomagnetic field, stars, the Sun, and polarized light patterns to determine their migratory direction. To prevent navigational errors, it is necessary to calibrate all of these compass systems to a common reference. We show that migratory Savannah sparrows use polarized light cues from the region of sky near the horizon to recalibrate the magnetic compass at both sunrise and sunset. We suggest that skylight polarization patterns are used to derive an absolute (i.e., geographic) directional system that provides the primary calibration reference for all of the compasses of migratory songbirds.
Address Department of Animal Ecology, Lund University, Ecology Building, SE-223 62 Lund, Sweden. rmuheim@vt.edu
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:16902138 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 243
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Author Meng, Y.; He, Z.; Yin, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, T.
Title Quantitative calculation of human melatonin suppression induced by inappropriate light at night Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Medical & Biological Engineering & Computing Abbreviated Journal Med Biol Eng Comput
Volume 49 Issue 9 Pages 1083-1088
Keywords (up) Algorithms; Circadian Rhythm/physiology/*radiation effects; Humans; *Lighting; Melatonin/*secretion; *Models, Biological; Retinal Cone Photoreceptor Cells/physiology/radiation effects; Retinal Ganglion Cells/physiology/radiation effects; Retinal Rod Photoreceptor Cells/physiology/radiation effects
Abstract Melatonin (C(1)(3)H(1)(6)N(2)O(2)) has a wide range of functions in the body. When is inappropriately exposed to light at night, human circadian rhythm will be interfered and then melatonin secretion will become abnormal. For nearly three decades great progresses have been achieved in analytic action spectra and melatonin suppression by various light conditions. However, so far few articles focused on the quantitative calculation of melatonin suppression induced by light. In this article, an algorithm is established, in which all the contributions of rods, cones, and intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells are considered. Calculation results accords with the experimental data in references very well, which indicate the validity of this algorithm. This algorithm can also interpret the rule of melatonin suppression varying with light correlated color temperature very well.
Address Photonics Research Center, School of Physics, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071, China
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0140-0118 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:21717231 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 236
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Author Stevens, R.G.; Brainard, G.C.; Blask, D.E.; Lockley, S.W.; Motta, M.E.
Title Adverse health effects of nighttime lighting: comments on American Medical Association policy statement Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication American Journal of Preventive Medicine Abbreviated Journal Am J Prev Med
Volume 45 Issue 3 Pages 343-346
Keywords (up) American Medical Association; Cell Cycle/physiology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; DNA Damage/physiology; *Health Policy; Humans; Lighting/*adverse effects; United States
Abstract The American Medical Association House of Delegates in June of 2012 adopted a policy statement on nighttime lighting and human health. This major policy statement summarizes the scientific evidence that nighttime electric light can disrupt circadian rhythms in humans and documents the rapidly advancing understanding from basic science of how disruption of circadian rhythmicity affects aspects of physiology with direct links to human health, such as cell cycle regulation, DNA damage response, and metabolism. The human evidence is also accumulating, with the strongest epidemiologic support for a link of circadian disruption from light at night to breast cancer. There are practical implications of the basic and epidemiologic science in the form of advancing lighting technologies that better accommodate human circadian rhythmicity.
Address University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut 06030-6325, USA. bugs@uchc.edu
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0749-3797 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23953362 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 130
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Author Miller, M.W.
Title Apparent Effects of Light Pollution on Singing Behavior of American Robins Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication The Condor Abbreviated Journal Condor
Volume 108 Issue 1 Pages 130
Keywords (up) American Robin; birds; light pollution; morning chorus; dawn chorus; song; Turdus migratorius; animals; communication
Abstract Astronomers consider light pollution to be a growing problem, however few studies have addressed potential effects of light pollution on wildlife. Sunlight is believed to initiate song in many bird species. If light initiates song, then light pollution may be influencing avian song behavior at a population level. This hypothesis predicts that birds breeding in areas with large amounts of artificial light will begin singing earlier in the day than birds in areas with little artificial light. Birds in highly illuminated areas might begin singing earlier than did birds in those same areas in previous years when artificial light levels were known to be, or were presumably, lower. Also, birds should begin singing earlier within a site on brightly lit nights. In 2002 and 2003 I documented initiation of morning song by breeding American Robins (Turdus migratorius) in areas with differing intensity of artificial nocturnal light. I compared my observations among sites and against historical studies. Robin populations in areas with large amounts of artificial light frequently began their morning chorus during true night. Chorus initiation time, relative to civil twilight, was positively correlated with amount of artificial light present during true night. Robin choruses in areas with little, or presumably little, artificial light have almost never begun during true night, instead appearing to track the onset of civil twilight. Proliferation of artificial nocturnal light may be strongly affecting singing behavior of American Robins at a population level.
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ISSN 0010-5422 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 39
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Author Grant, R.; Halliday, T.; Chadwick, E.
Title Amphibians' response to the lunar synodic cycle--a review of current knowledge, recommendations, and implications for conservation Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Behavioral Ecology Abbreviated Journal Behavioral Ecology
Volume 24 Issue 1 Pages 53-62
Keywords (up) amphibians; circular statistics; light; lunar cycle; moon phase; predator avoidance; reproductive synchronization; moonlight
Abstract The way in which amphibians respond to the geophysical changes brought about by the lunar synodic cycle is a neglected area of their ecology, but one which has recently generated interest. Knowledge of how amphibians respond to lunar phase is of intrinsic interest and also may be important for conservation and monitoring of populations. We surveyed the literature on amphibians’ responses to the lunar cycle and found 79 examples where moon phase in relation to amphibian behavior and ecology had been studied, across diverse amphibian taxa. Of the examples reviewed, most of them show some type of response to lunar phase, with only a few species being unaffected. We found that there is no significant difference between the numbers of species which increase, and those that decrease activity or reproductive behavior (including calling) during a full moon. The responses to the lunar cycle can not be generalized across taxonomic group, but instead are highly species specific and relate directly to the species’ ecology. The primary reasons for changes in amphibian behavior in response to the lunar cycle appear to be temporal synchronization of breeding and predator avoidance. Responses to changes in prey availability, facilitation of visual signalling and use of lunar cues in navigation and homing are less prevalent but merit further investigation. Comparisons between studies are hampered by differences in field and analytical methods; we therefore make a number of recommendations for future collection and analysis of data related to lunar phase.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1045-2249 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 81
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