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Author Porter, M.J.R.; Duncan, N.J.; Mitchell, D.; Bromagea, N.R.
Title The use of cage lighting to reduce plasma melatonin in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and its effects on the inhibition of grilsing Type Journal Article
Year 1999 Publication Aquaculture Abbreviated Journal Aquaculture
Volume 176 Issue 3-4 Pages 237-244
Keywords (up) Animals
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ISSN 0044-8486 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 794
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Author Dominoni, D.M.; Ã…kesson, S.; Klaassen, R.; Spoelstra, K.; Bulla, M.
Title Methods in field chronobiology Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B
Volume 372 Issue 1734 Pages 20160247
Keywords (up) Animals
Abstract Chronobiological research has seen a continuous development of novel approaches and techniques to measure rhythmicity at different levels of biological organization from locomotor activity (e.g. migratory restlessness) to physiology (e.g. temperature and hormone rhythms, and relatively recently also in genes, proteins and metabolites). However, the methodological advancements in this field have been mostly and sometimes exclusively used only in indoor laboratory settings. In parallel, there has been an unprecedented and rapid improvement in our ability to track animals and their behaviour in the wild. However, while the spatial analysis of tracking data is widespread, its temporal aspect is largely unexplored. Here, we review the tools that are available or have potential to record rhythms in the wild animals with emphasis on currently overlooked approaches and monitoring systems. We then demonstrate, in three question-driven case studies, how the integration of traditional and newer approaches can help answer novel chronobiological questions in free-living animals. Finally, we highlight unresolved issues in field chronobiology that may benefit from technological development in the future. As most of the studies in the field are descriptive, the future challenge lies in applying the diverse technologies to experimental set-ups in the wild.
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ISSN 0962-8436 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1753
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Author Scheibler, E.; Roschlau, C.; Brodbeck, D.
Title Lunar and temperature effects on activity of free-living desert hamsters (Phodopus roborovskii, Satunin 1903) Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication International Journal of Biometeorology Abbreviated Journal Int J Biometeorol
Volume 58 Issue 8 Pages 1769-1778
Keywords (up) Animals
Abstract Time management of truly wild hamsters was investigated in their natural habitat in Alashan desert, Inner Mongolia, China during summer of 2009, 2010, and 2012. Duration of activity outside their burrows, duration of foraging walks, and nocturnal inside stays were analyzed with the aim to elucidate impact of moon, ambient, and soil temperature. Animal data were determined using radio frequency identification (RFID) technique; for that purpose, individuals were caught in the field and marked with passive transponders. Their burrows were equipped with integrated microchip readers and photosensors for the detection of movements into or out of the burrow. Lunar impact was analyzed based on moon phase (full, waning, new, and waxing moons) and moon disk size. A prolongation of aboveground activity was shown with increasing moon disk size (Spearman rho = 0.237; p = 0.025) which was caused by earlier onsets (rho =-0.161; p = 0.048); additionally, foraging walks took longer (Pearson r = 0.037; p = 0.037). Temperature of different periods of time was analyzed, i.e., mean of whole day, of the activity phase, minimum, and maximum. Moreover, this was done for the current day and the previous 3 days. Overall, increasing ambient and soil temperatures were associated with shortening of activity by earlier offsets of activity and shorter nocturnal stays inside their burrows. Most influential temperatures for activity duration were the maximum ambient temperature, 3 days before (stepwise regression analysis R = 0.499; R (2) = 0.249; F = 7.281; p = 0.013) and soil temperature during activity phase, 1 day before (R = 0.644; R (2) = 0.283; F = 7.458; p = 0.004).
Address Department of Animal Physiology, Biological Institute, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, 70569, Stuttgart, Germany, elke.scheibler@bio.uni-stuttgart.de
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 0020-7128 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:24408344 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 804
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Author Gehring, J.; Kerlinger, P.; Manville, A.M. 2nd.
Title Communication towers, lights, and birds: successful methods of reducing the frequency of avian collisions. Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication Ecological Applications Abbreviated Journal
Volume 19 Issue 2 Pages 505-514
Keywords (up) Animals
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 841
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Author Fonken, L.K.; Nelson, R.J.
Title The effects of light at night on circadian clocks and metabolism Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Endocrine Reviews Abbreviated Journal Endocr Rev
Volume 35 Issue 4 Pages 648-670
Keywords (up) Animals
Abstract Most organisms display endogenously produced approximately 24-hour fluctuations in physiology and behavior, termed circadian rhythms. Circadian rhythms are driven by a transcriptional-translational feedback loop that is hierarchically expressed throughout the brain and body, with the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus serving as the master circadian oscillator at the top of the hierarchy. Appropriate circadian regulation is important for many homeostatic functions including energy regulation. Multiple genes involved in nutrient metabolism display rhythmic oscillations, and metabolically related hormones such as glucagon, insulin, ghrelin, leptin, and corticosterone are released in a circadian fashion. Mice harboring mutations in circadian clock genes alter feeding behavior, endocrine signaling, and dietary fat absorption. Moreover, misalignment between behavioral and molecular circadian clocks can result in obesity in both rodents and humans. Importantly, circadian rhythms are most potently synchronized to the external environment by light information and exposure to light at night potentially disrupts circadian system function. Since the advent of electric lights around the turn of the 20th century, exposure to artificial and irregular light schedules has become commonplace. The increase in exposure to light at night parallels the global increase in the prevalence of obesity and metabolic disorders. In this review, we propose that exposure to light at night alters metabolic function through disruption of the circadian system. We first provide an introduction to the circadian system, with a specific emphasis on the effects of light on circadian rhythms. Next we address interactions between the circadian system and metabolism. Finally, we review current experimental and epidemiological work directly associating exposure to light at night and metabolism.
Address Department of Neuroscience, Wexner Medical Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210
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ISSN 0163-769X ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:24673196 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 848
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