|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Plummer, K.E.; Hale, J.D.; O'Callaghan, M.J.; Sadler, J.P.; Siriwardena, G.M.
Title Investigating the impact of street lighting changes on garden moth communities Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Journal of Urban Ecology Abbreviated Journal J Urban Ecol
Volume 2 Issue 1 Pages juw004
Keywords (up) Animals
Abstract Night time illumination of cities is undergoing radical change through the adoption of new street lighting technologies, but the impacts of these large-scale changes on biodiversity have not been explored. Moths are of particular concern because of their nocturnal ‘flight-to-light’ responses. Here we examine in situ effects of (1) street lamp replacement and (2) the spatial distribution of local street lighting on garden moth communities in Birmingham, UK, to determine whether current shifts in street lighting infrastructure are leading to an increased attraction of moths into suburban areas. Using a unique before-after-control-impact survey, we show that switching from narrow (low-pressure sodium) to broad spectrum (high-pressure sodium) lamps significantly increases the diversity of macro-moths in suburban gardens. Furthermore, we demonstrate the complex ways in which the moth community differentially responds to variation in street lighting characteristics. In particular we found that macro-moth attraction was greatest at high lamp densities, whilst micro-moth families responded more strongly to street lamp proximity and the density of UV-emitting lamps specifically. Our findings indicate that moths are attracted to suburban gardens with closer, more dense and more spectrally diverse local street lighting, and suggest that suburban areas could represent ecological traps for moth communities if they have insufficient resources to support moth survival and reproduction. Further research is now needed to determine whether street lighting is progressively damaging moth communities, and to understand whether these impacts could be mitigated through changes to street lighting regimes or through the provision of ecologically important habitats in urban landscapes.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2058-5543 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1500
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Farkas, A.; Szaz, D.; Egri, A.; Barta, A.; Meszaros, A.; Hegedus, R.; Horvath, G.; Kriska, G.
Title Mayflies are least attracted to vertical polarization: A polarotactic reaction helping to avoid unsuitable habitats Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Physiology & Behavior Abbreviated Journal Physiol Behav
Volume 163 Issue Pages 219-227
Keywords (up) Animals
Abstract Like other aquatic insects, mayflies are positively polarotactic and locate water surfaces by means of the horizontal polarization of water-reflected light. However, may vertically polarized light also have implications for the swarming behaviour of mayflies? To answer this question, we studied in four field experiments the behavioural responses of Ephoron virgo and Caenis robusta mayflies to lamps emitting horizontally and vertically polarized and unpolarized light. In both species, unpolarized light induces positive phototaxis, horizontally polarized light elicits positive photo- and polarotaxis, horizontally polarized light is much more attractive than unpolarized light, and vertically polarized light is the least attractive if the stimulus intensities and spectra are the same. Vertically polarized light was the most attractive for C. robusta if its intensity was about two and five times higher than that of the unpolarized and horizontally polarized stimuli, respectively. We suggest that the mayfly behaviour observed in our experiments may facilitate the stability of swarming above water surfaces. Beside the open water surface reflecting horizontally polarized light, the shadow and mirror image of riparian vegetation at the edge of the water surface reflect weakly and non-horizontally (mainly vertically) polarized light. Due to their positive polarotaxis, flying mayflies remain continuously above the water surface, because they keep away from the unpolarized or non-horizontally polarizing edge regions (water surface and coast line) of water bodies. We also discuss how our findings can explain the regulation of mayfly colonization.
Address Danube Research Institute, MTA Centre for Ecological Research, H-1113 Budapest, Karolina ut 29-31, Hungary; Group for Methodology in Biology Teaching, Biological Institute, Eotvos University, H-1117 Budapest, Pazmany setany 1, Hungary. Electronic address: kriska@ludens.elte.hu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0031-9384 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27178399 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1501
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yang, Y.; Yu, Y.; Pan, J.; Ying, Y.; Zhou, H.
Title A new method to manipulate broiler chicken growth and metabolism: Response to mixed LED light system Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 6 Issue Pages 25972
Keywords (up) Animals
Abstract Present study introduced a new method to manipulate broiler chicken growth and metabolism by mixing the growth-advantage LED. We found that the green/blue LED mixed light system (G-B and G x B) have the similar stimulatory effect on chick body weight with single green light and single blue light (G and B), compared with normal artificial light (P = 0.028). Moreover, the percentage of carcass was significantly greater in the mixed light (G x B) when compared with the single light (P = 0.003). Synchronized with body weight, the mixed light (G-B and G x B) had a significant improved influence on the feed conversion of birds compared with normal light (P = 0.002). A significant improvement in feed conversion were found in mixed light (G x B) compared with single LED light (P = 0.037). G group resulted in a greater high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level than B group (P = 0.002), whereas B group resulted in a greater low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level than G group (P = 0.017). The mixed light significantly increased the birds' glucose level in comparison with the single light (P = 0.003). This study might establish an effective strategy for maximizing growth of chickens by mixed LED technology.
Address Department of Instrument Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27170597; PMCID:PMC4864324 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1502
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Voiculescu, S.E.; Duc, D.L.; Rosca, A.E.; Zeca, V.; Chitimus, D.M.; Arsene, A.L.; Dragoi, C.M.; Nicolae, A.C.; Zagrean, L.; Schöneberg, T.; Zagrean, A.-M.
Title Behavioral and molecular effects of prenatal continuous light exposure in the adult rat Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Brain Research Abbreviated Journal Brain Research
Volume 1650 Issue Pages 51–59
Keywords (up) Animals
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0006-8993 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1509
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Quiles, C.L.; de Oliveira, M.A.B.; Tonon, A.C.; Hidalgo, M.P.L.
Title Biological adaptability under seasonal variation of light/dark cycles Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 33 Issue 8 Pages 964-971
Keywords (up) Animals
Abstract 3A substantial amount of experimental models designed to understand rhythms entrainment and the effects of different regimens of light exposure on health have been proposed. However, many of them do not relate to what occurs in real life. Our objective was to evaluate the influence of “seasonal-like” variation in light/dark cycles on biological rhythms. Twenty adult male Wistar rats were assigned to three groups: control (CT), kept in 12:12 light/dark (LD) cycle; long photoperiod/short photoperiod (LP/SP), kept in 16.5:7.5 LD cycle for 18 days (phase A), then 17 days of gradual reductions in light time (phase B), then 18 days of shorter exposure (7.5:16.5 LD cycle, phase C); short photoperiod/long photoperiod (SP/LP) group, with same modifications as the LP/SP group, but in reverse order, starting phase A in 7.5:16.5 LD cycle. Activity and temperature were recorded constantly, and melatonin and cortisol concentrations were measured twice. Activity and temperature acrophases of all groups changed according to light. The correlation between activity and temperature was, overall, significantly lower for SP/LP group compared with LP/SP and CT groups. Regarding melatonin concentration, LP/SP group showed significant positive correlation between phase A and C (p = 0.018). Animals changed temperature and activity according to photoperiod and demonstrated better adaptability in transitioning from long to short photoperiod. Since this model imitates seasonal variation in light in a species that is largely used in behavioral experiments, it reveals promising methods to improve the reliability of experimental models and of further environmental health research.
Address b Pos-graduacao em Psiquiatria e Ciencias do Comportamento, Faculdade de Medicina (FAMED) , Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS) , Porto Alegre , Brasil
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27222076 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1512
Permanent link to this record