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Author Evans, J.A.; Elliott, J.A.; Gorman, M.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dim nighttime illumination accelerates adjustment to timezone travel in an animal model Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Current Biology : CB Abbreviated Journal Curr Biol  
  Volume 19 Issue 4 Pages R156-7  
  Keywords (up) *Adaptation, Physiological; Animals; Behavior, Animal/physiology; Biological Clocks/*physiology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Cricetinae; Humans; *Lighting; Mesocricetus; Mice; Motor Activity/physiology; Phodopus; *Photoperiod; Time Factors  
  Abstract Jetlag reflects a mismatch between local and circadian time following rapid timezone travel [1]. Appropriately timed bright light can shift human circadian rhythms but recovery is slow (e.g., 1-2 days per timezone). Most symptoms subside after resynchronization, but chronic jetlag may have enduring negative effects [2], including even accelerated mortality in mice [3]. Melatonin, prescription drugs, and/or exercise may help shift the clock but, like bright light, require complex schedules of application [1]. Thus, there is a need for more efficient and practical treatments for addressing jetlag. In contrast to bright daytime lighting, nighttime conditions have received scant attention. By incorporating more naturalistic nighttime lighting comparable in intensity to dim moonlight, we demonstrate that recovery after simulated jetlag is accelerated when nights are dimly lit rather than completely dark.  
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  ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:19243688 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 152  
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Author Obayashi, K.; Saeki, K.; Iwamoto, J.; Okamoto, N.; Tomioka, K.; Nezu, S.; Ikada, Y.; Kurumatani, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Exposure to light at night, nocturnal urinary melatonin excretion, and obesity/dyslipidemia in the elderly: a cross-sectional analysis of the HEIJO-KYO study Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism Abbreviated Journal J Clin Endocrinol Metab  
  Volume 98 Issue 1 Pages 337-344  
  Keywords (up) *Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Case-Control Studies; *Circadian Rhythm/physiology; Cross-Sectional Studies; Dyslipidemias/complications/metabolism/*urine; Female; Humans; Japan; *Light; Male; Melatonin/secretion/*urine; Obesity/complications/metabolism/*urine; Photoperiod  
  Abstract CONTEXT: Obesity and exposure to light at night (LAN) have increased globally. Although LAN suppresses melatonin secretion and disturbs body mass regulation in experimental settings, its associations with melatonin secretion, obesity, and other metabolic consequences in uncontrolled home settings remain unclear. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the association of exposure to LAN in an uncontrolled home setting with melatonin secretion, obesity, dyslipidemia, and diabetes. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS: A cross-sectional study was performed in 528 elderly individuals (mean age, 72.8 yr). MEASURES: The intensity of LAN in the bedroom was measured at 1-min intervals during two consecutive nights, along with overnight urinary melatonin excretion and metabolic parameters. RESULTS: Compared with the Dim group (average <3 lux; n = 383), the LAN group (average >/=3 lux; n = 145) showed significantly higher body weight (adjusted mean, 58.8 vs. 56.6 kg; P = 0.01), body mass index (23.3 vs. 22.7 kg/m(2); P = 0.04), waist circumference (84.9 vs. 82.8 cm; P = 0.01), triglyceride levels (119.7 vs. 99.5 mg/dl; P < 0.01), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (128.6 vs. 122.2 mg/dl; P = 0.04), and showed significantly lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (57.4 vs. 61.3 mg/dl; P = 0.02). These associations were independent of numerous potential confounders, including urinary melatonin excretion. Furthermore, LAN exposure is associated with higher odds ratios (ORs) for obesity (body mass index: OR, 1.89; P = 0.02; abdominal: OR, 1.62; P = 0.04) and dyslipidemia (OR, 1.72; P = 0.02) independent of demographic and socioeconomic parameters. In contrast, urinary melatonin excretion and glucose parameters did not show significant differences between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to LAN in an uncontrolled home setting is associated with impaired obese and lipid parameters independent of nocturnal urinary melatonin excretion in elderly individuals. Moreover, LAN exposure is associated with higher ORs for obesity and dyslipidemia independent of demographic and socioeconomic parameters.  
  Address Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Nara Medical University School of Medicine, 840 Shijocho, Kashiharashi, Nara, 634-8521, Japan. obayashi@naramed-u.ac.jp  
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  ISSN 0021-972X ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:23118419 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 168  
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Author Cochran, W.W.; Mouritsen, H.; Wikelski, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Migrating songbirds recalibrate their magnetic compass daily from twilight cues Type Journal Article
  Year 2004 Publication Science (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Science  
  Volume 304 Issue 5669 Pages 405-408  
  Keywords (up) *Animal Migration; Animals; Biological Clocks; Calibration; Cues; *Flight, Animal; Geography; *Magnetics; *Orientation; *Solar System; Songbirds/*physiology  
  Abstract Night migratory songbirds can use stars, sun, geomagnetic field, and polarized light for orientation when tested in captivity. We studied the interaction of magnetic, stellar, and twilight orientation cues in free-flying songbirds. We exposed Catharus thrushes to eastward-turned magnetic fields during the twilight period before takeoff and then followed them for up to 1100 kilometers. Instead of heading north, experimental birds flew westward. On subsequent nights, the same individuals migrated northward again. We suggest that birds orient with a magnetic compass calibrated daily from twilight cues. This could explain how birds cross the magnetic equator and deal with declination.  
  Address Illinois Natural History Survey, 607 East Peabody Drive, Champaign, IL61820, USA. Sparrow@springnet1.com  
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  ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:15087541 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 57  
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Author Schnitt, S.; Ruhtz, T.; Fischer, J.; Hölker, F.; Kyba, C.C.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Temperature stability of the sky quality meter Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Sensors (Basel, Switzerland) Abbreviated Journal Sensors (Basel)  
  Volume 13 Issue 9 Pages 12166-12174  
  Keywords (up) *Artifacts; Atmosphere/*analysis; Environmental Monitoring/*instrumentation; Equipment Design; Equipment Failure Analysis; Photometry/*instrumentation; Reproducibility of Results; Sensitivity and Specificity; Temperature; *Transducers; Sky Quality Meter; SQM  
  Abstract The stability of radiance measurements taken by the Sky Quality Meter (SQM)was tested under rapidly changing temperature conditions during exposure to a stable light field in the laboratory. The reported radiance was found to be negatively correlated with temperature, but remained within 7% of the initial reported radiance over a temperature range of -15 degrees C to 35 degrees C, and during temperature changes of -33 degrees C/h and +70 degrees C/h.This is smaller than the manufacturer's quoted unit-to-unit systematic uncertainty of 10%,indicating that the temperature compensation of the SQM is adequate under expected outdoor operating conditions.  
  Address Institute for Space Sciences, Freie Universitat Berlin, Carl-Heinrich-Becker-Weg 6-10, Berlin 12165, Germany. christopher.kyba@wew.fu-berlin.de  
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  ISSN 1424-8220 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:24030682; PMCID:PMC3821345 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 194  
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Author Rabaza, O.; Galadi-Enriquez, D.; Estrella, A.E.; Dols, F.A. url  doi
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  Title All-sky brightness monitoring of light pollution with astronomical methods Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Journal of Environmental Management Abbreviated Journal J Environ Manage  
  Volume 91 Issue 6 Pages 1278-1287  
  Keywords (up) *Astronomy; Calibration; *Environmental Pollutants; *Light  
  Abstract This paper describes a mobile prototype and a protocol to measure light pollution based on astronomical methods. The prototype takes three all-sky images using BVR filters of the Johnson-Cousins astronomical photometric system. The stars are then identified in the images of the Hipparcos and General Catalogue of Photometric Data II astronomical catalogues, and are used as calibration sources. This method permits the measurement of night-sky brightness and facilitates an estimate of which fraction is due to the light up-scattered in the atmosphere by a wide variety of man-made sources. This is achieved by our software, which compares the sky background flux to that of many stars of known brightness. The reduced weight and dimensions of the prototype allow the user to make measurements from virtually any location. This prototype is capable of measuring the sky distribution of light pollution, and also provides an accurate estimate of the background flux at each photometric band.  
  Address Department of Civil Engineering, University of Granada, Severo Ochoa Str. s/n, 18071 Granada, Spain. ovidio@ugr.es  
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  ISSN 0301-4797 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:20199844 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 192  
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