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Author Rakshit, K.; Thomas, A.P.; Matveyenko, A.V. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Does disruption of circadian rhythms contribute to beta-cell failure in type 2 diabetes? Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Current Diabetes Reports Abbreviated Journal Curr Diab Rep  
  Volume 14 Issue 4 Pages 474  
  Keywords (up) *epidemiology; diabetes; Type 2 diabetes; beta cell; T2DM; artificial light; light exposure; circadian disruption  
  Abstract Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a complex metabolic disease characterized by the loss of beta-cell secretory function and mass. The pathophysiology of beta-cell failure in T2DM involves a complex interaction between genetic susceptibilities and environmental risk factors. One environmental condition that is gaining greater appreciation as a risk factor for T2DM is the disruption of circadian rhythms (eg, shift-work and sleep loss). In recent years, circadian disruption has become increasingly prevalent in modern societies and consistently shown to augment T2DM susceptibility (partly mediated through its effects on pancreatic beta-cells). Since beta-cell failure is essential for development of T2DM, we will review current work from epidemiologic, clinical, and animal studies designed to gain insights into the molecular and physiological mechanisms underlying the predisposition to beta-cell failure associated with circadian disruption. Elucidating the role of circadian clocks in regulating beta-cell health will add to our understanding of T2DM pathophysiology and may contribute to the development of novel therapeutic and preventative approaches.  
  Address Larry L. Hillblom Islet Research Center, Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, University of California Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California, 900A Weyburn Place, Los Angeles, CA, 90095, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1534-4827 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:24532160; PMCID:PMC3988110 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 320  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bará, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light pollution and solid-state lighting: reducing the carbon dioxide footprint is not enough Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Proc. SPIE 8785, 8th Iberoamerican Optics Meeting and 11th Latin American Meeting on Optics, Lasers, and Applications, 87852G, 2013 Abbreviated Journal Proc. SPIE 8785  
  Volume 8785 Issue Pages  
  Keywords (up) *Lighting; LED; light emitting diode; outdoor lighting; artificial light at night; lighting policy; solid-state lighting; blue light  
  Abstract Public and private lighting account for a relevant share of the overall electric power consumption worldwide. The pressing need of reducing the carbon dioxide emissions as well as of lowering the lumen•hour price tag has fostered the search for alternative lighting technologies to substitute for the incandescent and gas-discharge based lamps. The most successful approach to date, solid-state lighting, is already finding its way into the public lighting market, very often helped by substantial public investments and support. LED-based sources have distinct advantages: under controlled conditions their efficacy equals or surpasses that of conventional solutions, their small source size allows for an efficient collimation of the lightbeam (delivering the photons where they are actually needed and reducing lightspill on the surrounding areas), and they can be switched and/or dimmed on demand at very high rates, thus allowing for a tailored schedule of lighting. However, energy savings and carbon dioxide reduction are not the only crucial issues faced by present day lighting. A growing body of research has shown the significance of the spectral composition of light when it comes to assess the detrimental effects of artificial light-at-night (ALAN). The potential ALAN blueshift associated to the deployment of LED-based lighting systems has raised sensible concerns about its scientific, cultural, ecological and public health consequences, which can be further amplified if an increased light consumption is produced due to the rebound effect. This contribution addresses some of the challenges that these issues pose to the Optics and Photonics community.  
  Address Univ. de Santiago de Compostela, Spain; salva.bara@usc.es  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher SPIE Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1135  
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Author Kuhn, L.; Johansson, M.; Laike, T.; Goven, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Residents' perceptions following retrofitting of residential area outdoor lighting with LEDs Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Lighting Research and Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research and Technology  
  Volume 45 Issue 5 Pages 568-584  
  Keywords (up) *Lighting; outdoor lighting; LED; light emitting diode; lighting levels; public opinion  
  Abstract The use of light emitting diodes (LEDs) in outdoor lighting has energy-saving potential, but users’ responses to this light source are largely unknown. An intervention study in two residential areas compared conventional lighting installations (high pressure sodium in Area 1 and high pressure mercury in Area 2) to a retrofitted LED-alternative regarding residents’ perceptions of quality of light, visual accessibility and danger. Moreover, energy use was calculated. Residents’ (N = 60) visual accessibility improved and perceived danger remained low in both areas after retrofitting. In Area 2 the perceived quality of light increased, whereas in Area 1 the results were mixed. The retrofitted application reduced energy use by 41–76% and might be a feasible alternative to conventional outdoor lighting in relatively safe areas.  
  Address Environmental Psychology, Department of Architecture and Built Environment, Lund University, Lund, Sweden  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1477-1535 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 280  
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Author Kyba, C.C.M.; Hänel, A.; Hölker, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Redefining efficiency for outdoor lighting Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Energy & Environmental Science Abbreviated Journal Energy Environ. Sci.  
  Volume 7 Issue 6 Pages 1806  
  Keywords (up) *Lighting; outdoor lighting; luminous efficiency; lighting standards; public policy; illuminance; street lighting  
  Abstract Improvements in the luminous efficiency of outdoor lamps might not result in energy savings or reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. The reason for this is a rebound effect: when light becomes cheaper, many users will increase illumination, and some previously unlit areas may become lit. We present three policy recommendations that work together to guarantee major energy reductions in street lighting systems. First, taking advantage of new technologies to use light only when and where it is needed. Second, defining maximum permitted illuminances for roadway lighting. Third, defining street lighting system efficiency in terms of kilowatt hours per kilometer per year. Adoption of these policies would not only save energy, but would greatly reduce the amount of light pollution produced by cities. The goal of lighting policy should be to provide the light needed for any given task while minimizing both the energy use and negative environmental side effects of the light.  
  Address Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Germany  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1754-5692 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 244  
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Author Haim, A.; Shanas, U.; Zubidad, A.E.S.; Scantelbury, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Seasonality and Seasons Out of Time--The Thermoregulatory Effects of Light Interference Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 22 Issue 1 Pages 59-66  
  Keywords (up) *Photoperiod; Microtus socialis; voles; thermoregulation; biology; animals  
  Abstract The change in photoperiod is the main environmental cue for seasonal function of the reproductive, thermoregulatory, and immune systems in rodents existing outside of the tropics. In Israel, the social vole Microtus socialis breeds mainly under short photoperiod (SP) conditions. Previous studies showed that exposing voles to light interference (LI) in the field during the winter resulted in death. The aim of the current study was to determine the thermoregulatory response of SP-acclimated voles to LI. Therefore, heat production (VO2) at different ambient temperatures (Ta) and nonshivering thermogenesis (NST) were measured. Results show that LI of 15 min every 4h during the dark period significantly (p < 0.02) decreased VO2 at Ta = 15 degrees C and significantly (p < 0.05) decreased NST-capacity. These results can at least partly explain why LI-voles died during the winter under field conditions, through eliminating winter acclimatization of the thermoregulatory system, or what is considered as “seasons out of time.”  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 32  
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