toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Obayashi, K.; Saeki, K.; Iwamoto, J.; Ikada, Y.; Kurumatani, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Association between light exposure at night and nighttime blood pressure in the elderly independent of nocturnal urinary melatonin excretion Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 31 Issue 6 Pages 779-786  
  Keywords (up) Actigraphy; circadian rhythm; elderly; light at night; melatonin; nighttime blood pressure; geriatrics  
  Abstract Circadian misalignment between internal and environmental rhythms dysregulates blood pressure (BP) variability because of disruption of the biological clock, resulting in increased nighttime BP. Although exposure to light-at-night is associated with the circadian misalignment, it remains unclear whether exposure to light-at-night in home settings is associated with nighttime BP. In this cross-sectional analysis of 528 elderly individuals (mean age: 72.8 years), we measured bedroom light intensity at 1-min intervals on two consecutive nights along with ambulatory BP, overnight urinary melatonin excretion and actigraphy. With regard to adjusted mean comparisons using analysis of covariance, the light-at-night group (average: >/=5 lux; n = 109) showed significantly higher nighttime systolic BP (SBP; adjusted mean: 120.8 vs. 116.5 mmHg, p = 0.01) and diastolic BP (70.1 vs. 67.1 mmHg, p < 0.01) compared with the Darker group (average: <5 lux; n = 419) independently of potential confounding factors including overnight urinary melatonin excretion and actigraphic sleep quality. We observed consistent associations between light-at-night and nighttime BP in different cutoff values for light-at-night intensity (i.e. 3 and 10 lux). In conclusion, exposure to light-at-night in home settings is significantly associated with increased nighttime BP in elderly individuals independently of overnight urinary melatonin excretion. A 4.3 mmHg increase in nighttime SBP is associated with a 6.1% increase in total mortality, which corresponds to approximately 10 000 annual excess deaths in Japanese elderly population.  
  Address Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Nara Medical University School of Medicine , Nara , Japan  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Informa Plc Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:24673296 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 315  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yadav, G.; Malik, S.; Rani, S.; Kumar, V. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Role of light wavelengths in synchronization of circadian physiology in songbirds Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Physiology & Behavior Abbreviated Journal Physiol Behav  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords (up) Activity; Animals; Bunting; Cortisol; Light wavelength; Melatonin; Weaver bird  
  Abstract This study investigated whether at identical duration and equal energy level birds presented with short (450nm; blue, B) and long (640nm; red, R) light wavelengths would differentially interpret them and exhibit wavelength-dependent circadian behavioral and physiological responses, despite the difference in their breeding latitudes. Temperate migratory blackheaded buntings (Emberiza melanocephala) and subtropical non-migratory Indian weaverbirds (Ploceus philippinus) initially entrained to 12h light:12h darkness (12L:12D; L=0.33muM/m2/s, D=0muM/m2/s) in two groups of each, groups 1 and 2, were subjected to constant light (LL, 0.33muM/m2/s), which rendered them arrhythmic in the activity behavior. They were then exposed for about two weeks each to 12B:12R and 12R:12B (group 1) or 12R:12B and 12B:12R (group 2) at 0.33muM/m2/s light energy level. Blue and red light periods were interpreted as the day and night, respectively, with activity and no-activity in non-migratory weaverbirds or activity and intense activity (Zugunruhe, migratory night restlessness) in the migratory buntings. Consistent with this, plasma melatonin levels under B:R, not R:B, light cycle were low and high in blue and red light periods, respectively. A similar diurnal pattern was absent in the cortisol levels, however. These results show an important role of light wavelengths in synchronization of the circadian clock governed behavior and physiology to the photoperiodic environment, and suggest that photoperiodic timing might be a conserved physiological adaptation in many more birds, regardless of the difference in breeding latitudes, than has been generally envisaged.  
  Address DST-IRHPA Centre for Excellence in Biological Rhythms Research, Department of Zoology, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 007, India. Electronic address: drvkumar11@yahoo.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0031-9384 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:25536387 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1080  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Narendra, A.; Reid, S.F.; Raderschall, C.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Navigational efficiency of nocturnal Myrmecia ants suffers at low light levels Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 8 Issue 3 Pages e58801  
  Keywords (up) Adaptation, Biological/*physiology; Animals; Ants/*physiology; Australian Capital Territory; *Cues; Geographic Information Systems; Homing Behavior/*physiology; *Light; Locomotion/*physiology; Orientation/*physiology; insects  
  Abstract Insects face the challenge of navigating to specific goals in both bright sun-lit and dim-lit environments. Both diurnal and nocturnal insects use quite similar navigation strategies. This is despite the signal-to-noise ratio of the navigational cues being poor at low light conditions. To better understand the evolution of nocturnal life, we investigated the navigational efficiency of a nocturnal ant, Myrmecia pyriformis, at different light levels. Workers of M. pyriformis leave the nest individually in a narrow light-window in the evening twilight to forage on nest-specific Eucalyptus trees. The majority of foragers return to the nest in the morning twilight, while few attempt to return to the nest throughout the night. We found that as light levels dropped, ants paused for longer, walked more slowly, the success in finding the nest reduced and their paths became less straight. We found that in both bright and dark conditions ants relied predominantly on visual landmark information for navigation and that landmark guidance became less reliable at low light conditions. It is perhaps due to the poor navigational efficiency at low light levels that the majority of foragers restrict navigational tasks to the twilight periods, where sufficient navigational information is still available.  
  Address ARC Centre of Excellence in Vision Science, Research School of Biology, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia. ajay.narendra@anu.edu.au  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23484052; PMCID:PMC3590162 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 117  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Dacke, M.; Nilsson, D.-E.; Scholtz, C.H.; Byrne, M.; Warrant, E.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Animal behaviour: insect orientation to polarized moonlight Type Journal Article
  Year 2003 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature  
  Volume 424 Issue 6944 Pages 33  
  Keywords (up) Adaptation, Physiological/physiology; Animals; Beetles/*physiology; Feces; Feeding Behavior/physiology; *Light; Locomotion/*physiology; *Moon; Orientation/*physiology; Scarabaeus zambesianus  
  Abstract Moonlight, like sunlight, scatters when it strikes tiny particles in the atmosphere, giving rise to celestial polarization patterns. Here we show that an African dung beetle, Scarabaeus zambesianus, uses the polarization of a moonlit sky to orientate itself so that it can move along a straight line. Many creatures use the Sun's light-polarization pattern to orientate themselves, but S. zambesianus is the first animal known to use the million-times dimmer polarization of moonlight for this purpose.  
  Address Department of Cell and Organism Biology, University of Lund, 223 62 Lund, Sweden. marie.dacke@cob.lu.se  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:12840748 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 242  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Boivin, D.B.; Boudreau, P.; James, F.O.; Kin, N.M.K.N.Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Photic resetting in night-shift work: impact on nurses' sleep Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 29 Issue 5 Pages 619-628  
  Keywords (up) Adaptation, Physiological; Adult; *Circadian Rhythm; *Darkness; Female; Humans; *Light; Male; Melatonin/metabolism; Middle Aged; *Nurses; Sleep/*physiology; Work Schedule Tolerance/*physiology  
  Abstract The objective of this study was to quantify daytime sleep in night-shift workers with and without an intervention designed to recover the normal relationship between the endogenous circadian pacemaker and the sleep/wake cycle. Workers of the treatment group received intermittent exposure to full-spectrum bright light during night shifts and wore dark goggles during the morning commute home. All workers maintained stable 8-h daytime sleep/darkness schedules. The authors found that workers of the treatment group had daytime sleep episodes that lasted 7.1 +/- .1 h (mean +/- SEM) versus 6.6 +/- .2 h for workers in the control group (p = .04). The increase in total sleep time co-occurred with a larger proportion of the melatonin secretory episode during daytime sleep in workers of the treatment group. The results of this study showed reestablishment of a phase angle that is comparable to that observed on a day-oriented schedule favors longer daytime sleep episodes in night-shift workers. (Author correspondence: diane.boivin@douglas.mcgill.ca ).  
  Address Centre for Study and Treatment of Circadian Rhythms, Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. diane.boivin@douglas.mcgill.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22621359 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 144  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: