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Author Grunsven van, Roy H.A.; Creemers, Raymond; Joosten, Kris; Donners Maurice; Veenendaal, Elmar M.
Title Behaviour of migrating toads under artificial lights differs from other phases of their life cycle Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Amphibia-Reptilia Abbreviated Journal AMRE
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords (up) animal, amphibia, Anura, fragmentation, light pollution, mitigation, phototaxis, spectra
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Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1568
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Author Arnaud Da Silva, Jelmer M. Samplonius, Emmi Schlicht, Mihai Valcu, Bart Kempenaers
Title Artificial night lighting rather than traffic noise affects the daily timing of dawn and dusk singing in common European songbirds Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Behavioral Ecology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 25 Issue 5 Pages 1037-1047
Keywords (up) animal, birds, dawn chorus, dusk chorus, light intensity, light pollution, noise pollution, seasonality, songbird, weather
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Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1105
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Author Fure, A.
Title Bats and lighting — six years on Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication The London Naturalist Abbreviated Journal
Volume 91 Issue Pages 69-88
Keywords (up) Animals
Abstract Since my ‘Bats and lighting’ review (Fure 2006), there has been interesting comment

from a number of sources: bat workers, entomologists and those from ophthalmic fields;

lighting professionals from the UK and Europe; and natural light campaigners (CPRE

and the Campaign for Dark Skies, CfDS). There has also been an increase in studies,

reviews, publications and guidance.Topics range from bat ecology, bat physiology, bats v.

illumination and insects v. illumination, and as prey species, rendering the initial review

out of date. All beg for a swift and positive intervention to change the way that we light

the environment
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Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 379
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Author Le Tallec, T.; Perret, M.; Théry, M.
Title Light Pollution Modifies the Expression of Daily Rhythms and Behavior Patterns in a Nocturnal Primate Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication PLoS ONE Abbreviated Journal
Volume 8 Issue 11 Pages e79250
Keywords (up) Animals
Abstract Among anthropogenic pressures, light pollution altering light/dark cycles and changing the nocturnal component of the environment constitutes a threat for biodiversity. Light pollution is widely spread across the world and continuously growing. However, despite the efforts realized to describe and understand the effects of artificial lighting on fauna, few studies have documented its consequences on biological rhythms, behavioral and physiological functions in nocturnal mammals. To determine the impacts of light pollution on nocturnal mammals an experimental study was conducted on a nocturnal primate, the grey mouse lemur Microcebus murinus. Male mouse lemurs (N = 8) were exposed 14 nights to moonlight treatment and then exposed 14 nights to light pollution treatment. For both treatments, chronobiological parameters related to locomotor activity and core temperature were recorded using telemetric transmitters. In addition, at the end of each treatment, the 14th night, nocturnal and feeding behaviors were explored using an infrared camera. Finally, throughout the study, body mass and daily caloric food intake were recorded. For the first time in a nocturnal primate, light pollution was demonstrated to modify daily rhythms of locomotor activity and core temperature especially through phase delays and increases in core temperature. Moreover, nocturnal activity and feeding behaviors patterns were modified negatively. This study suggests that light pollution induces daily desynchronization of biological rhythms and could lead to seasonal desynchronization with potential deleterious consequences for animals in terms of adaptation and anticipation of environmental changes.
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Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 380
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Author Nowinszky, L.
Title Light-trap Catch of Harmful Microlepidoptera Species in Connection with Polarized Moonlight and Collecting Distance Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Journal of Advanced Laboratory Research in Biology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 4 Issue 4 Pages 108-117
Keywords (up) Animals
Abstract The paper deals with light-trap catch of 25 Microlepidoptera species depending on the polarized moonlight and

collecting distance. The catching data were chosen from the 27 stations of the Hungarian National Light-trap Network and

from the years between 1959 and 1961. Relative catch values were calculated from the catching data per stations and

swarming. They are ranged and averaged in the phase angle divisions. The catching peak of ten species is in First Quarter,

another ten species have the peak in the First Quarter and Last one, and only in two cases the peak is in Last Quarter. Then

there is the maximum ratio of polarized moonlight. Catching peak of only three species is in connection with the collecting

distance when is the greatest of collection distance.

Keywords: Microlepidoptera, light-trap moon phases, polarized moonlight, catching distance.
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Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 381
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