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Author Hüppop, O.; Hilgerloh, G.
Title Flight call rates of migrating thrushes: effects of wind conditions, humidity and time of day at an illuminated offshore platform Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Journal of Avian Biology Abbreviated Journal Journal of Avian Biology
Volume 43 Issue 1 Pages 85-90
Keywords (up) Animals
Abstract Many bird species call during migration, but call rates not necessarily reflect migration intensity. They rather seem to increase under deteriorating flight conditions. Often, nocturnal mass collisions at illuminated structures coincide with such conditions and are accompanied with high call rates of migrants. Thus, call rates could act as an indicator for situations with high collision risk for birds namely at off shore sites with hardly any alternatives for landing. In the face of increasing numbers of off shore wind farms knowledge about the environmental conditions in which maximum call rates occur, is needed for mitigation measures.

In this first long-term study at an off shore site in the southern North Sea we investigated the effect of weather on the frequency of flight calls of three thrush-species at an illuminated platform. Flight calls were registered automatically during three autumn migration seasons. Besides generally higher call rates from 5 to 2 h before until 6 h after midnight, call rates increased with tailwinds, a change of the tailwind component during the first part of the night, off shore crosswinds and very high humidity.

A monitoring programme is suggested that could help to reduce mass mortalities at illuminated structures.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0908-8857 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1396
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Author Farnworth, B.; Innes, J.; Waas, J.R.
Title Converting Predation Cues into Conservation Tools: The Effect of Light on Mouse Foraging Behaviour Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One
Volume 11 Issue 1 Pages e0145432
Keywords (up) Animals
Abstract Prey face a conflict between acquiring energy and avoiding predators and use both direct and indirect cues to assess predation risk. Illumination, an indirect cue, influences nocturnal rodent foraging behaviour. New Zealand holds no native rodent species but has introduced mice (Mus musculus) that severely impair native biodiversity. We used Giving-Up Densities (GUDs) and observations of foraging frequency and duration to assess if artificial light induces risk avoidance behaviour in mice and could limit their activity. We found both captive (wild strain) mice in outdoor pens and wild mice within a pest fenced sanctuary (Maungatautari, New Zealand) displayed avoidance behaviour in response to illumination. In captivity, total foraging effort was similar across lit and unlit pens but mice displayed a strong preference for removing seeds from dark control areas (mean: 15.33 SD: +/-11.64 per 3.5 hours) over illuminated areas (2.00 +/-3.44). Wild mice also removed fewer seeds from illuminated areas (0.42 +/-1.00 per 12 hours) compared to controls (6.67 +/-9.20). Captive mice spent less than 1.0% of available time at illuminated areas, versus 11.3% at controls; visited the lit areas less than control areas (12.00 +/- 9.77 versus 29.00 +/-21.58 visits respectively); and spent less time per visit at illuminated versus control areas (8.17 +/-7.83 versus 44.83 +/-87.52 seconds per visit respectively). Illumination could provide protection at ecologically sensitive sites, damaged exclusion fences awaiting repair, fence terminus zones of peninsula sanctuaries and shipping docks that service offshore islands. We promote the hypothesis that the tendency of mice to avoid illumination could be a useful conservation tool, and advance knowledge of risk assessment and foraging under perceived danger.
Address University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:26760039 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1339
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Author Shafiei Sabet, S.; Van Dooren, D.; Slabbekoorn, H.
Title Son et lumiere: Sound and light effects on spatial distribution and swimming behavior in captive zebrafish Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Environmental Pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987) Abbreviated Journal Environ Pollut
Volume 212 Issue Pages 480-488
Keywords (up) Animals
Abstract Aquatic and terrestrial habitats are heterogeneous by nature with respect to sound and light conditions. Fish may extract signals and exploit cues from both ambient modalities and they may also select their sound and light level of preference in free-ranging conditions. In recent decades, human activities in or near water have altered natural soundscapes and caused nocturnal light pollution to become more widespread. Artificial sound and light may cause anxiety, deterrence, disturbance or masking, but few studies have addressed in any detail how fishes respond to spatial variation in these two modalities. Here we investigated whether sound and light affected spatial distribution and swimming behavior of individual zebrafish that had a choice between two fish tanks: a treatment tank and a quiet and light escape tank. The treatments concerned a 2 x 2 design with noisy or quiet conditions and dim or bright light. Sound and light treatments did not induce spatial preferences for the treatment or escape tank, but caused various behavioral changes in both spatial distribution and swimming behavior within the treatment tank. Sound exposure led to more freezing and less time spent near the active speaker. Dim light conditions led to a lower number of crossings, more time spent in the upper layer and less time spent close to the tube for crossing. No interactions were found between sound and light conditions. This study highlights the potential relevance for studying multiple modalities when investigating fish behavior and further studies are needed to investigate whether similar patterns can be found for fish behavior in free-ranging conditions.
Address Behavioral Biology, Institute of Biology Leiden (IBL), Leiden University, The Netherlands
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:26963699 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1369
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Author Nickla, D.L.; Totonelly, K.
Title Brief light exposure at night disrupts the circadian rhythms in eye growth and choroidal thickness in chicks Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Experimental eye Research Abbreviated Journal Exp Eye Res
Volume 146 Issue Pages 189-195
Keywords (up) Animals
Abstract Changes in ocular growth that lead to myopia or hyperopia are associated with alterations in the circadian rhythms in eye growth, choroidal thickness and intraocular pressure in animal models of emmetropization. Recent studies have shown that light at night has deleterious effects on human health, acting via “circadian disruptions” of various diurnal rhythms, including changes in phase or amplitude. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of brief, 2-hour episodes of light in the middle of the night on the rhythms in axial length and choroidal thickness, and whether these alter eye growth and refractive error in the chick model of myopia. Starting at 2 weeks of age, birds received 2 hours of light between 12:00 am and 2:00 am for 7 days (n=12; total hours of light: 14 hrs). Age-matched controls had a continuous dark night (n=14; 14L/10D). Ocular dimensions were measured using high-frequency A-scan ultrasonography on the first day of the experiment, and again on day 7, at 6-hour intervals, starting at noon (12pm, 6pm, 12am, 6am, 12pm). Measurements during the night were done under a photographic safe-light. These data were used to determine rhythm parameters of phase and amplitude. 2 groups of birds, both experimental (light at night) and control, were measured with ultrasound at various intervals over the course of 4 weeks to determine growth rates. Refractive errors were measured in 6 experimental and 6 control birds at the end of 2 weeks. Eyes of birds in a normal L/D cycle showed sinusoidal 24-hour period diurnal rhythms in axial length and choroid thickness. Light in the middle of the night caused changes in both the rhythms in axial length and choroidal thickness, such that neither could be fit to a sine function having a period of 24 hours. Light caused an acute, transient stimulation in ocular growth rate in the subsequent 6-hour period (12 am to 6 am), that may be responsible for the increased growth rate seen 4 weeks later, and the more myopic refractive error. It also abolished the increase in choroidal thickness that normally occurs between 6 pm and 12 am. We conclude that light at night alters the rhythms in axial length and choroidal thickness in an animal model of eye growth, and that these circadian disruptions might lead to the development of ametropias. These results have implications for the use of light during the night in children.
Address The New England College of Optometry, Boston, MA, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0014-4835 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:26970497 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1371
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Author Rane, T.; Taha, S.
Title Kicked in the Face by a Fish Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Open Journal of Emergency Medicine Abbreviated Journal Ojem
Volume 03 Issue 04 Pages 41-44
Keywords (up) Animals
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2332-1806 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1386
Permanent link to this record