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Author Beck, W.; Gobatto, C.
Title Effect of high wavelengths low intensity light during dark period on physical exercise performance, biochemical and haematological parameters of swimming rats Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Acta Physiologica Hungarica Abbreviated Journal Acta Physiol Hung
Volume 103 Issue 1 Pages 112-120
Keywords (up) Animals
Abstract Nocturnal rodents should be assessed at an appropriate time of day, which leads to a challenge in identifying an adequate environmental light which allows animal visualisation without perturbing physiological homeostasis. Thus, we analysed the influence of high wavelength and low intensity light during dark period on physical exercise and biochemical and haematological parameters of nocturnal rats. We submitted 80 animals to an exhaustive exercise at individualised intensity under two different illuminations during dark period. Red light (> 600 nm; < 15lux) was applied constantly during dark period (EI; for experimental illumination groups) or only for handling and assessments (SI; for standard illumination groups). EI led to worse haematological and biochemical conditions, demonstrating that EI alone can influence physiological parameters and jeopardise result interpretation. SI promotes normal physiological conditions and greater aerobic tolerance than EI, showing the importance of a correct illumination pattern for all researchers that employ nocturnal rats for health/disease or sports performance experiments.
Address Laboratory of Applied Sport Physiology, School of Physical Education, University of Campinas , Sao Paulo , Brasil
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0231-424X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27030633 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1410
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Author Robertson, K.; Booth, D.T.; Limpus, C.J.
Title An assessment of 'turtle-friendly' lights on the sea-finding behaviour of loggerhead turtle hatchlings (Caretta caretta) Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Wildlife Research Abbreviated Journal Wildl. Res.
Volume 43 Issue 1 Pages 27
Keywords (up) Animals
Abstract Context: It is well established that artificial light can disrupt the sea-finding ability of sea turtle hatchlings, and some manufactures are now marketing ‘turtle-friendly’ lights that are supposed to be minimally disruptive to this sea-finding behaviour. However, there have been no studies that have tested whether ‘turtle-friendly’ lights are benign to hatchling sea turtle sea-finding ability.

Aims: We tested two different types of ‘turtle-friendly’ lights (LED amber-light peak intensity 620 nm and LED red-light peak intensity 640 nm) to see whether they are disruptive to the sea-finding ability of eastern-coast Australian loggerhead turtle hatchlings.

Methods: Using standard circular-arena experiments, we assessed the directional preference of newly emerged loggerhead turtle hatchlings from the Woongarra Coast of Queensland, Australia, during different moon phases without artificial lighting and in the presence of ‘turtle-friendly’ lights.

Key results: Contrary to expectations, sea-finding ability of hatchlings was disrupted by the amber lights, particularly in the absence of a moon. The less intense red lights were less disruptive to hatchlings; however, misorientation and disorientation events still occurred when lights were within 4 m of hatchlings. The disruptive impact on sea-finding ability increased with the cumulative impact of multiple lights increasing light intensity.

Conclusions: The ‘turtle-friendly’ lights we used disrupted the sea-finding ability of eastern-coast Australian loggerhead turtle hatchlings, with the most pronounced disruption occurring under moonless conditions.

Implications: The use of amber and red LED lights adjacent to the nesting beaches of loggerhead sea turtles should be managed because this lighting has the potential to disrupt the sea-finding ability of sea turtle hatchlings.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1035-3712 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1413
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Author Watson, M.J.; Wilson, D.R.; Mennill, D.J.
Title Anthropogenic light is associated with increased vocal activity by nocturnally migrating birds Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication The Condor Abbreviated Journal The Condor
Volume 118 Issue 2 Pages 338-344
Keywords (up) Animals
Abstract Anthropogenic modifications to the natural environment have profound effects on wild animals, through structural changes to natural ecosystems as well as anthropogenic disturbances such as light and noise. For animals that migrate nocturnally, anthropogenic light can interfere with migration routes, flight altitudes, and social activities that accompany migration, such as acoustic communication. We investigated the effect of anthropogenic light on nocturnal migration of birds through the Great Lakes ecosystem. Specifically, we recorded the vocal activity of migrating birds and compared the number of nocturnal flight calls produced above rural areas with ground-level artificial lights compared to nearby areas without lights. We show that more nocturnal flight calls are detected over artificially lit areas. The median number of nocturnal flight calls recorded at sites with artificial lights (31 per night, interquartile range: 15–135) was 3 times higher than at nearby sites without artificial lights (11 per night, interquartile range: 4–39). By contrast, the number of species detected at lit and unlit sites did not differ significantly (artificially lit sites: 6.5 per night, interquartile range: 5.0–8.8; unlit sites: 4.5 per night, interquartile range: 2.0–7.0). We conclude that artificial lighting changes the behavior of nocturnally migrating birds. The increased detections could be a result of ground-level light sources altering bird behavior during migration. For example, birds might have changed their migratory route to pass over lit areas, flown at lower altitudes over lit areas, increased their calling rate over lit areas, or remained longer over lit areas. Our results for ground-level lights correspond to previous findings demonstrating that migratory birds are influenced by lights on tall structures.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0010-5422 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1422
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Author Yang, Y.; Yu, Y.; Yang, B.; Zhou, H.; Pan, J.
Title Physiological responses to daily light exposure Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 6 Issue Pages 24808
Keywords (up) Animals
Abstract Long daylength artificial light exposure associates with disorders, and a potential physiological mechanism has been proposed. However, previous studies have examined no more than three artificial light treatments and limited metabolic parameters, which have been insufficient to demonstrate mechanical responses. Here, comprehensive physiological response curves were established and the physiological mechanism was strengthened. Chicks were illuminated for 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, or 22 h periods each day. A quadratic relationship between abdominal adipose weight (AAW) and light period suggested that long-term or short-term light exposure could decrease the amount of AAW. Quantitative relationships between physiological parameters and daily light period were also established in this study. The relationships between triglycerides (TG), cholesterol (TC), glucose (GLU), phosphorus (P) levels and daily light period could be described by quadratic regression models. TG levels, AAW, and BW positively correlated with each other, suggesting long-term light exposure significantly increased AAW by increasing TG thus resulting in greater BW. A positive correlation between blood triiodothyronine (T3) levels and BW suggested that daily long-term light exposure increased BW by thyroid hormone secretion. Though the molecular pathway remains unknown, these results suggest a comprehensive physiological mechanism through which light exposure affects growth.
Address College of Biosystems Engineering and Food Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27098210 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1424
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Author Seltmann, S.; Trost, L.; Ter Maat, A.; Gahr, M.
Title Natural melatonin fluctuation and its minimally invasive simulation in the zebra finch Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication PeerJ Abbreviated Journal
Volume 4 Issue Pages e1939
Keywords (up) Animals
Abstract Melatonin is a key hormone in the regulation of circadian rhythms of vertebrates, including songbirds. Understanding diurnal melatonin fluctuations and being able to reverse or simulate natural melatonin levels are critical to investigating the influence of melatonin on various behaviors such as singing in birds. Here we give a detailed overview of natural fluctuations in plasma melatonin concentration throughout the night in the zebra finch. As shown in previous studies, we confirm that “lights off” initiates melatonin production at night in a natural situation. Notably, we find that melatonin levels return to daytime levels as early as two hours prior to the end of the dark-phase in some individuals and 30 min before “lights on” in all animals, suggesting that the presence of light in the morning is not essential for cessation of melatonin production in zebra finches. Thus, the duration of melatonin production seems not to be specified by the length of night and might therefore be less likely to directly couple circadian and annual rhythms. Additionally, we show that natural melatonin levels can be successfully simulated through a combination of light-treatment (daytime levels during subjective night) and the application of melatonin containing skin-cream (nighttime levels during subjective day). Moreover, natural levels and their fluctuation in the transition from day to night can be imitated, enabling the decoupling of the effects of melatonin, for example on neuronal activity, from sleep and circadian rhythmicity. Taken together, our high-resolution profile of natural melatonin levels and manipulation techniques open up new possibilities to answer various melatonin related questions in songbirds.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2167-8359 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1425
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