|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Cinzano, P.; Falchi, F.; Elvidge, C.D.
Title Moonlight Without The Moon Type Journal Article
Year 1998 Publication Earth, Moon, and Planets Abbreviated Journal
Volume 85/86 Issue Pages 517-522
Keywords (up)
Abstract Light pollution, the alteration of the natural light levels in the night environment produced by man-made light, is one of the most rapidly increasing threats to the natural environment. The fast growth of the night sky brightness due to light pollution not only is damaging the perception of the starry sky but it is silently altering even the perception of the moonlight nights by mankind. The cyclic alternation between the new Moon's dark sky with thousand of stars and the moonlight sky, less dark but always full of stars among which our satellite moves, is rapidly changing toward a perennial artificial moonlight due to the man-made light wasted in the atmosphere. The Moon periodically will appear inside the same perennially luminous sky from which stars will have almost disappeared. Here we present a map showing artificial moonlight levels in North America and some statistical results.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0167-9295 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 174
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Elvidge, C.D.; Baugh, K.E.; Zhizhin, M.; Hsu, F.-C.
Title Why VIIRS data are superior to DMSP for mapping nighttime lights Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Proceedings of the Asia-Pacific Advanced Network Abbreviated Journal APAN Proceedings
Volume 35 Issue Pages 62
Keywords (up)
Abstract For more than forty years the U.S. Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS) has been the only satellite system collecting global low-light imaging data. A series of twenty-four DMSP satellites have collected low-light imaging data. The design of the OLS has not changed significantly since satellite F-4 flew in the late 1970’s and OLS data have relatively coarse spatial resolution, limited dynamic range, and lack in-flight calibration. In 2011 NASA and NOAA launched the Suomi National Polar Partnership (SNPP) satellite carrying the first Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument. The VIIRS collects low light imaging data and has several improvements over the OLS’ capabilities. In this paper we contrast the nighttime low light imaging collection capabilities of these two systems and compare their data products.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2227-3026 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 198
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhuo, L.; Ichinose, T.; Zheng, J.; Chen, J.; Shi, P.J.; Li, X.
Title Modelling the population density of China at the pixel level based on DMSP/OLS non-radiance-calibrated night-time light images Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication International Journal of Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal International Journal of Remote Sensing
Volume 30 Issue 4 Pages 1003-1018
Keywords (up)
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0143-1161 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 208
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Elvidge, C.D.; Ziskin, D.; Baugh, K.E.; Tuttle, B.T.; Ghosh, T.; Pack, D.W.; Erwin, E.H.; Zhizhin, M.
Title A Fifteen Year Record of Global Natural Gas Flaring Derived from Satellite Data Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication Energies Abbreviated Journal Energies
Volume 2 Issue 3 Pages 595-622
Keywords (up)
Abstract We have produced annual estimates of national and global gas flaring and gas flaring efficiency from 1994 through 2008 using low light imaging data acquired by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP). Gas flaring is a widely used practice for the disposal of associated gas in oil production and processing facilities where there is insufficient infrastructure for utilization of the gas (primarily methane). Improved utilization of the gas is key to reducing global carbon emissions to the atmosphere. The DMSP estimates of flared gas volume are based on a calibration developed with a pooled set of reported national gas flaring volumes and data from individual flares. Flaring efficiency was calculated as the volume of flared gas per barrel of crude oil produced. Global gas flaring has remained largely stable over the past fifteen years, in the range of 140 to 170 billion cubic meters (BCM). Global flaring efficiency was in the seven to eight cubic meters per barrel from 1994 to 2005 and declined to 5.6 m3 per barrel by 2008. The 2008 gas flaring estimate of 139 BCM represents 21% of the natural gas consumption of the USA with a potential retail market value of $68 billion. The 2008 flaring added more than 278 million metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) into the atmosphere. The DMSP estimated gas flaring volumes indicate that global gas flaring has declined by 19% since 2005, led by gas flaring reductions in Russia and Nigeria, the two countries with the highest gas flaring levels. The flaring efficiency of both Russia and Nigeria improved from 2005 to 2008, suggesting that the reductions in gas flaring are likely the result of either improved utilization of the gas, reinjection, or direct venting of gas into the atmosphere, although the effect of uncertainties in the satellite data cannot be ruled out. It is anticipated that the capability to estimate gas flaring volumes based on satell
Address gas flaring; carbon emissions; nighttime lights; DMSP-OLS; remote sensing; light at night; satellite
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1996-1073 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 231
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Boomsma, C.; Steg, L.
Title Feeling Safe in the Dark: Examining the Effect of Entrapment, Lighting Levels, and Gender on Feelings of Safety and Lighting Policy Acceptability Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Environment and Behavior Abbreviated Journal Environment and Behavior
Volume 46 Issue 2 Pages 193-212
Keywords (up)
Abstract This research examined to what extent physical factors, notably lighting and entrapment (blocked escape), and individual factors, notably gender, affect feelings of safety and the acceptability of reduced lighting levels. The authors reasoned that acceptability of reduced street lighting depends on perceived safety, which in turn depends on entrapment, lighting, and gender. Virtual representations of a residential street were used, systematically manipulating entrapment and lighting levels. As expected, people felt less safe in lower lighting and higher entrapment settings, and these settings were evaluated as less acceptable. Although women perceived a situation as less safe compared with men, the authors found no gender differences in acceptability, which extends previous research. Importantly, as hypothesized, perceived safety mediated the effect of lighting on acceptability levels, suggesting that people can accept lower lighting levels when social safety is not threatened.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0013-9165 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 252
Permanent link to this record