toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Hastings, J. W.; B. M. Sweeney url  openurl
  Title A persistent diurnal rhythm of luminescence in Ganyaulax Polyedra Type Journal Article
  Year 1958 Publication The Biological Bulletin Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 115 Issue 3 Pages 440-458  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract 1. The characteristics of a persistent diurnal rhythm of luminescence in the dinoflagellate Gonyaulax polyedra are described.

2. The light emission upon stimulation, from cultures which are kept in alternating light and dark periods of 12 hours each (= LD), is 40 to 60 times greater during the dark period than during the light period. If LD cultures are placed in continuous dim light (100 foot-candles) a diurnal rhythm of luminescence persists. If LD cultures are placed in continuous bright light (> 1500 foot-candles) the rhythm is damped, and no fluctuations occur in the amount of light emitted.

3. The occurrence of rhythmicity is not dependent upon prior exposure to LD conditions. Cultures which have been grown in bright light for as long as one year show a diurnal rhythm when placed in constant dim light or darkness. Cultures kept in alternating light and dark cycles which are greater or less than 24 hours similarly show a diurnal rhythm when returned to constant dim light or darkness. “Training” or “memory” is therefore not involved.

4. The rhythm can be entrained by light-dark cycles which are different from 24 hours. The period of the luminescence rhythm corresponds to light-dark cycles which have periods ranging between 12 and 32 hours.

5. The period of the rhythm is always close to 24 hours when the cells are kept under constant conditions, but it varies slightly depending upon the temperature and light intensity.

6. The phase of the rhythm under constant conditions is related to the time at which the previous lightand dark periods occurred. Moreover, the phase may be shifted by interposing a non-repeated exposure to a different light intensity. The number of hours by which the phase is shifted in such an experiment is dependent upon the intensity and duration of the light treatment, and the time in the cycle when it is administered.

7. Exhaustive mechanical stimulation does not alter the phase of the rhythm.

8. When cultures having different phases were mixed, no evidence was found which would indicate that there was any interaction between them.

9. The evidence presented indicates that the diurnal rhythmicity is the consequence of a basic oscillatory mechanism which is inherent to the cell.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 759  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Nordt, A.; R. Klenke, url  openurl
  Title Schläfst du noch oder singst du schon – Verschiebung des morgendlichen Gesangsbeginns stadtlebender Amseln Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Vogelwarte Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 49 Issue Pages 306  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 789  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Porter, M.J.R.; Duncan, N.J.; Mitchell, D.; Bromagea, N.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The use of cage lighting to reduce plasma melatonin in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and its effects on the inhibition of grilsing Type Journal Article
  Year 1999 Publication Aquaculture Abbreviated Journal Aquaculture  
  Volume 176 Issue 3-4 Pages 237-244  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0044-8486 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 794  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Dominoni, D.M.; Ã…kesson, S.; Klaassen, R.; Spoelstra, K.; Bulla, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Methods in field chronobiology Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B  
  Volume 372 Issue 1734 Pages 20160247  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract Chronobiological research has seen a continuous development of novel approaches and techniques to measure rhythmicity at different levels of biological organization from locomotor activity (e.g. migratory restlessness) to physiology (e.g. temperature and hormone rhythms, and relatively recently also in genes, proteins and metabolites). However, the methodological advancements in this field have been mostly and sometimes exclusively used only in indoor laboratory settings. In parallel, there has been an unprecedented and rapid improvement in our ability to track animals and their behaviour in the wild. However, while the spatial analysis of tracking data is widespread, its temporal aspect is largely unexplored. Here, we review the tools that are available or have potential to record rhythms in the wild animals with emphasis on currently overlooked approaches and monitoring systems. We then demonstrate, in three question-driven case studies, how the integration of traditional and newer approaches can help answer novel chronobiological questions in free-living animals. Finally, we highlight unresolved issues in field chronobiology that may benefit from technological development in the future. As most of the studies in the field are descriptive, the future challenge lies in applying the diverse technologies to experimental set-ups in the wild.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0962-8436 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1753  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Scheibler, E.; Roschlau, C.; Brodbeck, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Lunar and temperature effects on activity of free-living desert hamsters (Phodopus roborovskii, Satunin 1903) Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication International Journal of Biometeorology Abbreviated Journal Int J Biometeorol  
  Volume 58 Issue 8 Pages 1769-1778  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract Time management of truly wild hamsters was investigated in their natural habitat in Alashan desert, Inner Mongolia, China during summer of 2009, 2010, and 2012. Duration of activity outside their burrows, duration of foraging walks, and nocturnal inside stays were analyzed with the aim to elucidate impact of moon, ambient, and soil temperature. Animal data were determined using radio frequency identification (RFID) technique; for that purpose, individuals were caught in the field and marked with passive transponders. Their burrows were equipped with integrated microchip readers and photosensors for the detection of movements into or out of the burrow. Lunar impact was analyzed based on moon phase (full, waning, new, and waxing moons) and moon disk size. A prolongation of aboveground activity was shown with increasing moon disk size (Spearman rho = 0.237; p = 0.025) which was caused by earlier onsets (rho =-0.161; p = 0.048); additionally, foraging walks took longer (Pearson r = 0.037; p = 0.037). Temperature of different periods of time was analyzed, i.e., mean of whole day, of the activity phase, minimum, and maximum. Moreover, this was done for the current day and the previous 3 days. Overall, increasing ambient and soil temperatures were associated with shortening of activity by earlier offsets of activity and shorter nocturnal stays inside their burrows. Most influential temperatures for activity duration were the maximum ambient temperature, 3 days before (stepwise regression analysis R = 0.499; R (2) = 0.249; F = 7.281; p = 0.013) and soil temperature during activity phase, 1 day before (R = 0.644; R (2) = 0.283; F = 7.458; p = 0.004).  
  Address Department of Animal Physiology, Biological Institute, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, 70569, Stuttgart, Germany, elke.scheibler@bio.uni-stuttgart.de  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0020-7128 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:24408344 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 804  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: