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Author Blair, A. url  isbn
openurl 
  Title Sark in the Dark: Wellbeing and Community on the Dark Sky Island of Sark Type Book Whole
  Year 2016 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Society; ecopsychology; environmental psychology; psychology  
  Abstract Studies of the beneficial and transformative qualities of encounters with nature typically focus on ‘green’ or grounded nature. In 'Sark in the Dark', Ada Blair shifts this focus upwards to a refreshing encounter with the richness of the dark night sky. In this book, she documents the research she conducted while at the University of Wales Trinity Saint David into the culture and history of the world’s first designated Dark Sky Island. Through a series of interviews with Sark residents, as well as poignant self-reflections, Blair explores the importance of the dark sky on human wellbeing and community.  
  Address caladach(at)gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Sophia Centre Press Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Sophia Centre Master Monographs Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 978-1-907767-42-5 Medium (down) Print  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1780  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Tapia Ayuga, C.; Sánchez de Miguel, A.; Zamorano Calvo, J. url  openurl
  Title LICA-UCM lamps spectral database Type Report
  Year 2015 Publication unpublished Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Lighting; Instrumentation; technical report; Madrid; Spain; spectroscopy; spectra  
  Abstract Spectra of the lamps that are used for public lighting and ornamental purposes have been obtained with a portable spectrograph around Madrid city. The database is presented in this report along with a description of the procedures.  
  Address Grupo UCM de Astrofísica Extragaláctica e Instrumentación Astronómica, Madrid  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Madrid Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title LICA Reports Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium (down) PDF  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Request to add by CK even though non-peer-reviewed Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1094  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Navara, K.J.; Nelson, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The dark side of light at night: physiological, epidemiological, and ecological consequences Type Journal Article
  Year 2007 Publication Journal of Pineal Research Abbreviated Journal J Pineal Res  
  Volume 43 Issue 3 Pages 215-224  
  Keywords Animals; Biological Clocks; *Darkness; Disease; Ecology; Humans; Oxidative Stress; Work  
  Abstract Organisms must adapt to the temporal characteristics of their surroundings to successfully survive and reproduce. Variation in the daily light cycle, for example, acts through endocrine and neurobiological mechanisms to control several downstream physiological and behavioral processes. Interruptions in normal circadian light cycles and the resulting disruption of normal melatonin rhythms cause widespread disruptive effects involving multiple body systems, the results of which can have serious medical consequences for individuals, as well as large-scale ecological implications for populations. With the invention of electrical lights about a century ago, the temporal organization of the environment has been drastically altered for many species, including humans. In addition to the incidental exposure to light at night through light pollution, humans also engage in increasing amounts of shift-work, resulting in repeated and often long-term circadian disruption. The increasing prevalence of exposure to light at night has significant social, ecological, behavioral, and health consequences that are only now becoming apparent. This review addresses the complicated web of potential behavioral and physiological consequences resulting from exposure to light at night, as well as the large-scale medical and ecological implications that may result.  
  Address Department of Psychology, Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA. knavara@gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-3098 ISBN Medium (down)  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:17803517 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 17  
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Author Gerrish, G.A.; Morin, J.G.; Rivers, T.J.; Patrawala, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Darkness as an ecological resource: the role of light in partitioning the nocturnal niche Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Oecologia Abbreviated Journal Oecologia  
  Volume 160 Issue 3 Pages 525-536  
  Keywords Age Factors; Animals; Belize; Crustacea/*physiology; *Darkness; *Ecosystem; Feeding Behavior/physiology; Linear Models; Motor Activity/*physiology; Photoperiod; Sexual Behavior, Animal/physiology; Water Movements  
  Abstract Nocturnal behaviors that vary as a function of light intensity, either from the setting sun or the moon, are typically labeled as circadian or circalunar. Both of these terms refer to endogenous time-dependent behaviors. In contrast, the nightly reproductive and feeding behaviors of Vargula annecohenae, a bioluminescent ostracod (Arthropoda: Crustacea) fluctuate in response to light intensity, an exogenous factor that is not strictly time-dependent. We measured adult and juvenile activity of V. annecohenae throughout lunar cycles in January/February and June 2003. Overnight and nightly measurements of foraging and reproductive behavior of adult V. annecohenae indicated that activity was greatest when a critical “dark threshold” was reached and that the dark threshold for adult V. annecohenae is met when less than a third of the moon is visible or at the intensity of light 2-3 min before the start of nautical twilight when no moon is illuminated. Juvenile V. annecohenae were also nocturnally active but demonstrated little or no response to lunar illumination, remaining active even during brightly moonlit periods. In addition to light level, water velocity also influenced the behaviors of V. annecohenae, with fewer juveniles and adults actively foraging on nights when water velocity was high (>25 cm/s). Our data demonstrate that the strongest environmental factor influencing adult feeding and reproductive behaviors of V. annecohenae is the availability of time when illumination is below the critical dark threshold. This dependence on darkness for successful growth and reproduction allows us to classify darkness as a resource, in the same way that the term has been applied to time, space and temperature.  
  Address Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850, USA. ggerrish@nd.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0029-8549 ISBN Medium (down)  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:19330516 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 16  
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Author Horváth, G.; Kriska, G.; Malik, P.; Robertson, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Polarized light pollution: a new kind of ecological photopollution Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment Abbreviated Journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment  
  Volume 7 Issue 6 Pages 317-325  
  Keywords light pollution; polarization; polarized light pollution  
  Abstract The alteration of natural cycles of light and dark by artificial light sources has deleterious impacts on animals and ecosystems. Many animals can also exploit a unique characteristic of light – its direction of polarization –as a source of information. We introduce the term “polarized light pollution” (PLP) to focus attention on the ecological consequences of light that has been polarized through interaction with human-made objects. Unnatural polarized light sources can trigger maladaptive behaviors in polarization-sensitive taxa and alter ecological interactions. PLP is an increasingly common byproduct of human technology, and mitigating its effects through selective use of building materials is a realistic solution. Our understanding of how most species use polarization vision is limited, but the capacity of PLP to drastically increase mortality and reproductive failure in animal populations suggests that PLP should become a focus for conservation biologists and resource managers alike.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1540-9295 ISBN Medium (down)  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 22  
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