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Author Franklin, M.; Chau, K.; Cushing, L.J.; Johnston, J.
Title Characterizing flaring from unconventional oil and gas operations in south Texas using satellite observations Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Environmental Science & Technology Abbreviated Journal Environ Sci Technol
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Over the past decade, increases in high-volume hydraulic fracturing for oil and gas extraction in the United States have raised concerns with residents living near wells. Flaring, or the combustion of petroleum products into the open atmosphere, is a common practice associated with oil and gas exploration and production, and has been under-examined as a potential source of exposure. We leveraged data from the Visible Infrared Imaging Spectroradiometer (VIIRS) Nightfire satellite product to characterize the extent of flaring in the Eagle Ford Shale region of south Texas, one of the most productive in the nation. Spatiotemporal hierarchical clustering identified flaring sources, and a regression-based approach combining VIIRS information with reported estimates of vented and flared gas from the Railroad Commission of Texas enabled estimation of flared gas volume at each flare. We identified 43,887 distinct oil and gas flares in the study region from 2012-2016, with a peak in activity in 2014 and an estimated 4.5 billion cubic meters of total gas volume flared over the study period. A comparison with well permit data indicated the majority of flares were associated with oil-producing (82%) and horizontally-drilled (92%) wells. Of the 49 counties in the region, 5 accounted for 71% of the total flaring. Our results suggest flaring may be a significant environmental exposure in parts of this region.
Address
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN 0013-936X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:30657671 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2175
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Author Mireku, M.O.; Barker, M.M.; Mutz, J.; Dumontheil, I.; Thomas, M.S.C.; Roosli, M.; Elliott, P.; Toledano, M.B.
Title Night-time screen-based media device use and adolescents' sleep and health-related quality of life Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Environment International Abbreviated Journal Environ Int
Volume 124 Issue Pages 66-78
Keywords Human Health
Abstract OBJECTIVE: The present study investigates the relationship between night-time screen-based media devices (SBMD) use, which refers to use within 1h before sleep, in both lit and dark rooms, and sleep outcomes and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among 11 to 12-year-olds. METHODS: We analysed baseline data from a large cohort of 6616 adolescents from 39 schools in and around London, United Kingdom, participating in the Study of Cognition Adolescents and Mobile Phone (SCAMP). Adolescents self-reported their use of any SBMD (mobile phone, tablet, laptop, television etc.). Sleep variables were derived from self-reported weekday and/or weekend bedtime, sleep onset latency (SOL) and wake time. Sleep quality was assessed using four standardised dimensions from the Swiss Health Survey. HRQoL was estimated using the KIDSCREEN-10 questionnaire. RESULTS: Over two-thirds (71.5%) of adolescents reported using at least one SBMD at night-time, and about a third (32.2%) reported using mobile phones at night-time in darkness. Night-time mobile phone and television use was associated with higher odds of insufficient sleep duration on weekdays (Odds Ratio, OR=1.82, 95% Confidence Interval, CI [1.59, 2.07] and OR=1.40, 95% CI [1.23, 1.60], respectively). Adolescents who used mobile phones in a room with light were more likely to have insufficient sleep (OR=1.32, 95% CI [1.10, 1.60]) and later sleep midpoint (OR=1.64, 95% CI [1.37, 1.95]) on weekends compared to non-users. The magnitude of these associations was even stronger for those who used mobile phones in darkness for insufficient sleep duration on weekdays (OR=2.13, 95% CI [1.79, 2.54]) and for later sleep midpoint on weekdays (OR=3.88, 95% CI [3.25, 4.62]) compared to non-users. Night-time use of mobile phones was associated with lower HRQoL and use in a dark room was associated with even lower KIDSCREEN-10 score (beta=-1.18, 95% CI [-1.85, -0.52]) compared to no use. CONCLUSIONS: We found consistent associations between night-time SBMD use and poor sleep outcomes and worse HRQoL in adolescents. The magnitude of these associations was stronger when SBMD use occurred in a dark room versus a lit room.
Address MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, W2 1PG, UK; National Institute for Health Research Health Protection Research Unit in Health Impact of Environmental Hazards at King's College London, a Partnership with Public Health England, and collaboration with Imperial College London, W2 1PG, UK. Electronic address: m.toledano@imperial.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0160-4120 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:30640131 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2181
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Author Farghly, M.F.; Mahrose, K.M.; Ahmad, E.A.M.; Rehman, Z.U.; Yu, S.
Title Implementation of different feeding regimes and flashing light in broiler chicks Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Poultry Science Abbreviated Journal Poult Sci
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Animals
Abstract A 3 x 2 factorial arrangement was implemented to determine the performance of 450 Cobb broilers subjected to different feeding regimes with and without lighting programs. The chicks were divided into 3 groups according to the feeding regime (ad libitum, restricted, or intermittent), and each group was reared under one of two lighting programs (100% continuous light or 50% continuous light and 50% flashing light). The results showed that the broilers under the ad libitum and intermittent feeding regimes had superior body weight (BW) and average daily gain (ADG) values and the lowest feed conversion ratio (FCR) at 3 and 6 wk of age. Broilers exposed to flashing light and an intermittent feeding regime had the highest BW and ADG values and the lowest FCR. Birds exposed to intermittent feeding had the highest dressed carcass weight and the lowest heart weight. Broilers reared with flashing light had higher tenderness and juiciness values than the other groups. Broilers subjected to a restricted feeding regime and flashing light had the lowest abdominal fat values of all the groups. Tenderness and juiciness were significantly higher in broilers subjected to the ad libitum feeding regime x flashing light and the intermittent feeding regime x flashing light. Broilers fed an intermittent regime had the lowest spleen %, heterophil, heterophil to lymphocyte (H/L) ratio and body temperature values of all the groups, and broilers reared under the intermittent regime x flashing light had the lowest spleen %, H/L ratio and body temperature values. Non-significant differences in all health aspects (shank length, keel bone length, foot pad burns, breast blisters score, hock discoloration, and mortality) were observed among the experimental groups. In conclusion, intermittent and restricted feeding regimes and a flashing lighting program improved the FCR and did not produce any adverse effects on performance or physiological parameters. The results of this work show that intermittent feeding and flashing lighting programs are more beneficial to broiler management.
Address Shanghai Veterinary Research Institute (SHVRI), Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences (CAAS), Shanghai 200241, China
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0032-5791 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:30615175 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2158
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Author Zhen, J.; Pei, T.; Xie, S.
Title Kriging methods with auxiliary nighttime lights data to detect potentially toxic metals concentrations in soil Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication The Science of the Total Environment Abbreviated Journal Sci Total Environ
Volume 659 Issue Pages 363-371
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract The spatial distribution of potentially toxic metals (PTMs) has been shown to be related to anthropogenic activities. Several auxiliary variables, such as those related to remote sensing data (e.g. digital elevation models, land use, and enhanced vegetation index) and soil properties (e.g. pH, soil type and cation exchange capacity), have been used to predict the spatial distribution of soil PTMs. However, these variables are mostly focused on natural processes or a single aspect of anthropogenic activities and cannot reflect the effects of integrated anthropogenic activities. Nighttime lights (NTL) images, a representative variable of integrated anthropogenic activities, may have the potential to reflect PTMs distribution. To uncover this relationship and determine the effects on evaluation precision, the NTL was employed as an auxiliary variable to map the distribution of PTMs in the United Kingdom. In this study, areas with a digital number (DN)>/=50 and an area>30km(2) were extracted from NTL images to represent regions of high-frequency anthropogenic activities. Subsequently, the distance between the sampling points and the nearest extracted area was calculated. Barium, lead, zinc, copper, and nickel concentrations exhibited the highest correlation with this distance. Their concentrations were mapped using distance as an auxiliary variable through three different kriging methods, i.e., ordinary kriging (OK), cokriging (CK), and regression kriging (RK). The accuracy of the predictions was evaluated using the leave-one-out cross validation method. Regardless of the elements, CK and RK always exhibited lower mean absolute error and root mean square error, in contrast to OK. This indicates that using the NTL as the auxiliary variable indeed enhanced the prediction accuracy for the relevant PTMs. Additionally, RK showed superior results in most cases. Hence, we recommend RK for prediction of PTMs when using the NTL as the auxiliary variable.
Address State Key Laboratory of Geological Processes and Mineral Resources(GPMR), Faculty of Earth Sciences, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan, 430074, China
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:30599355 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2494
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Author Flores, D.E.F.L.; Oda, G.A.
Title Novel Light/Dark Regimens with Minimum Light Promote Circadian Disruption: Simulations with a Model Oscillator Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Biological Rhythms Abbreviated Journal J Biol Rhythms
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Animals
Abstract Artificial lab manipulation of LD cycles has enabled simulations of the disruptive conditions found in modern human societies, such as jet-lag, night-work and light at night. New techniques using animal models have been developed, and these can greatly improve our understanding of circadian disruption. Some of these techniques, such as in vivo bioluminescence assays, require minimum external light. This requirement is challenging because the usual lighting protocols applied in circadian desynchronization experiments rely on considerable light input. Here, we present a novel LD regimen that can disrupt circadian rhythms with little light per day, based on computer simulations of a model limit-cycle oscillator. The model predicts that a single light pulse per day has the potential to disturb rhythmicity when pulse times are randomly distributed within an interval. Counterintuitively, the rhythm still preserves an underlying 24-h periodicity when this interval is as large as 14 h, indicating that day/night cues are still detectable. Only when pulses are spread throughout the whole 24-h day does the rhythm lose any day-to-day period correlation. In addition, the model also reveals that stronger pulses of brighter light should exacerbate the disrupting effects. We propose the use of this LD schedule-which would be compatible with the requirements of in vivo bioluminescence assays-to help understand circadian disruption and associated illnesses.
Address Instituto de Biociencias, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0748-7304 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:30595077 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2146
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