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Author Baekelandt, S.; Milla, S.; Cornet, V.; Flamion, E.; Ledore, Y.; Redivo, B.; Antipine, S.; Mandiki, S.N.M.; Houndji, A.; El Kertaoui, N.; Kestemont, P.
Title Seasonal simulated photoperiods influence melatonin release and immune markers of pike perch Sander lucioperca Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 2650
Keywords Animals
Abstract Melatonin is considered as the time-keeping hormone acting on important physiological functions of teleosts. While the influence of melatonin on reproduction and development is well described, its potential role on immune functions has little been considered. In order to better define an immune modulation by the melatonin hormone, we hypothesized that natural variations of photoperiod and subsequent changes in melatonin release profile may act on immune status of pikeperch. Therefore, we investigated during 70 days the effects of two photoperiod regimes simulating the fall and spring in western Europe, on pikeperch physiological and immune responses. Samples were collected at 04:00 and 15:00 at days 1, 37 and 70. Growth, plasma melatonin levels, innate immune markers and expression of immune-relevant genes in head kidney tissue were assessed. While growth and stress level were not affected by the seasonal simulated photoperiods, nocturnal levels of plasma melatonin were photoperiod-dependent. Innate immune markers, including lysozyme, complement, peroxidase and phagocytic activities, were stimulated by the fall-simulated photoperiod and a significant correlation was made with plasma melatonin. In addition to bring the first evidence of changes in fish immunocompetence related to photoperiod, our results provide an additional indication supporting the immunomodulatory action of melatonin in teleosts.
Address Research Unit in Environmental and Evolutionary Biology (URBE), Institute of Life, Earth & Environment, University of Namur, Rue de Bruxelles 61, Namur, B-5000, Belgium
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:32060347; PMCID:PMC7021833 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2942
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Author Rabin, J.; Cha, C.; Nguyen, M.; Renteria, L.; Abebe, F.; Wastani, A.
Title Cool (blue) vs. warm (yellow) displays enhance visual function Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Eye (London, England) Abbreviated Journal Eye (Lond)
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Displays emitting substantial blue light (phones, tablets, computers) can produce eyestrain (computer vision syndrome: CVS) [1, 2]. Yet findings have been challenged [3]. A metric to assess CVS is the highest detectable flicker rate (CFF). We compared the short-term effects of bluish (“cool”) vs. yellowish (“warm”) displays on high temporal frequency contrast sensitivity (TCS), which relates directly to the CFF.
Address University of the Incarnate Word Rosenberg School of Optometry, San Antonio, TX, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0950-222X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:32029916 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3020
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Author Yue, F.; Xia, K.; Wei, L.; Xing, L.; Wu, S.; Shi, Y.; Man, L.S.; Shui, G.; Xiang, X.; Russell, R.; Zhang, D.
Title Constant light exposure causes dysregulation of sphingolipids and promotes steatohepatitis in high-fat fed rats Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Abbreviated Journal J Gastroenterol Hepatol
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Animals; apoptosis; ceramide; light pollution; non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; sphingolipids
Abstract BACKGROUND AND AIM: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a growing public health concern worldwide. With the progression of urbanization, light pollution is becoming an inevitable risk factor for NAFLD. However, the role of light pollution on NAFLD is insufficiently understood, and the underlying mechanism remains unclear. The present study explored effects of constant light exposure on NAFLD and elucidated its related mechanisms. METHODS: Thirty-two male SD rats were divided into 4 groups (n=8 each): 1) rats on a normal diet exposed to standard light-dark cycle (ND-LD); 2) rats on a normal diet exposed to constant light (ND-LL); 3) rats on a high fat diet exposed to standard light-dark cycle (HFD-LD); 4) and rats on a high fat diet exposed to constant light (HFD-LL). After 12 weeks treatment, rats were sacrificed and pathophysiological assessments were performed. Targeted lipidomics was used to measure sphingolipids, including ceramides, glucosylceramides and lactosylceramides, sphingomyelins and sphingosine-1-phosphates in plasma and liver tissues. RESULTS: In normal chow rats, constant light exposure led to glucose abnormalities and dyslipidemia. In high-fat fed rats, constant light exposure exacerbated glucose abnormalities, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, inflammation and aggravated steatohepatitis. Compared to HFD-LD rats, HFD-LL had decreased plasma sphingosine-1-phosphate and elevated liver concentrations of total ceramides and specific ceramide species (ceramide d18:0/24:0, ceramide d18:1/22:0, ceramide d18:1/24:0 and ceramide d18:1/24:1), and which were associated with increased hepatocyte apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS: Constant light exposure causes dysregulation of sphingolipids and promotes steatohepatitis in high-fat fed rats.
Address Department of Endocrinology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, China
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0815-9319 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:32027419 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2829
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Author Ritonja, J.; McIsaac, M.A.; Sanders, E.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Grundy, A.; Cordina-Duverger, E.; Spinelli, J.J.; Aronson, K.J.
Title Outdoor light at night at residences and breast cancer risk in Canada Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication European Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Eur J Epidemiol
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Human Health; Breast cancer; Case-control study; Circadian disruption; Light at night; Night work; Women's health
Abstract Experimental and epidemiologic studies suggest that light at night (LAN) exposure disrupts circadian rhythm, and this disruption may increase breast cancer risk. We investigated the potential association between residential outdoor LAN and breast cancer risk. A population-based case-control study was conducted in Vancouver, British Columbia and Kingston, Ontario, Canada with incident breast cancer cases, and controls frequency matched by age in the same region. This analysis was restricted to 844 cases and 905 controls who provided lifetime residential histories. Using time-weighted average duration at each home 5-20 years prior to study entry, two measures of cumulative average outdoor LAN were calculated using two satellite data sources. Logistic regression was used to estimate the relationship between outdoor LAN and breast cancer risk, considering interactions for menopausal status and night shift work. We found no association between residential outdoor LAN and breast cancer for either measure of LAN [OR comparing highest vs. lowest tertile (DNB) = 0.95, 95% CI 0.70-1.27]. We also found no association when considering interactions for menopausal status and past/current night work status. These findings were robust to changes to years of residential data considered, residential mobility, and longer exposure windows. Our findings are consistent with studies reporting that outdoor LAN has a small effect or no effect on breast cancer risk.
Address Division of Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Cancer Research Institute, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada. aronson@queensu.ca
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0393-2990 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:32026169 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2826
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Author Kyba, C.C.M.; Conrad, J.; Shatwell, T.
Title Lunar illuminated fraction is a poor proxy for moonlight exposure Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Nature Ecology & Evolution Abbreviated Journal Nat Ecol Evol
Volume 4 Issue Pages 318-319
Keywords Animals; Moonlight; Commentary
Abstract San-Jose et al. recently demonstrated that the colouration of barn owls impacts their hunting success under moonlit conditions, and therefore affects their reproductive success1. They found that near full-moon conditions, the youngest nestlings with white fathers were fed more and were likelier to survive than those with redder fathers. While the study is interesting, the percentage of the Moon that is illuminated (lunar illuminated fraction) is unfortunately a poor proxy for moonlight exposure. We suggest that lunar illluminated fraction should, in general, never be used in biological studies, as alternative variables such as horizontal illuminance better represent moonlight exposure, and therefore offer a greater chance of detecting the effects of moonlight. Here, we provide a brief explanation of how moonlight varies with season and time of night, and stress the need for greater collaboration between biologists and astronomers or physicists in such studies in the future.
Address Seenforschung, Helmholtz-Zentrum fur Umweltforschung-UFZ, Magdeburg, Germany
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2397-334X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:32015523 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2827
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