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Author Lin, Y.; Liu, Y.; Sun, Y.; Zhu, X.; Lai, J.; Heynderickx, I.
Title Model predicting discomfort glare caused by LED road lights Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Optics Express Abbreviated Journal Opt. Express
Volume 22 Issue 15 Pages 18056
Keywords LED; LED lighting; glare; road safety; traffic
Abstract To model discomfort glare from LED road lighting, the effect of four key variables on perceived glare was explored. These variables were: the average glare source luminance (Lg), the background luminance (Lb), the solid angle of the glare source from the perspective of the viewer; and the angle between the glare source and the line of sight. Based on these four variables 72 different light conditions were simulated in a scaled experimental set-up. Participants were requested to judge the perceived discomfort glare of these light conditions using the deBoer rating scale. All four variables and some of their interactions had indeed a significant effect on the deBoer rating. Based on these findings, we developed a model, and tested its general applicability in various verification experiments, including laboratory conditions as well as real road conditions. This verification proved the validity of the model with a correlation between measured and predicted values as high as 0.87 and a residual deviation of about 1 unit on the deBoer rating scale. These results filled the gap in estimating discomfort glare of LED road lighting and clarified similarities of and differences in discomfort glare between LED and traditional light sources.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1094-4087 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (up) Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 351
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Author Poulin, C.; Bruyant, F.; Laprise, M.-H.; Cockshutt, A.M.; Marie-Rose Vandenhecke, J.; Huot, Y.
Title The impact of light pollution on diel changes in the photophysiology of Microcystis aeruginosa Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Journal of Plankton Research Abbreviated Journal Journal of Plankton Research
Volume 36 Issue 1 Pages 286-291
Keywords light pollution; Microcystis aeruginosa; Cyanobacteria; diel cycles; biology; plankton
Abstract Assessing the effect of light pollution, Microcystis aeruginosa was grown with and without low levels of night lighting. Significant differences were observed between the treatments in the maximum quantum yield of charge separation, the intracellular chlorophyll a concentration, the functional absorption cross-section of photosystem II, the number of Rubisco per cell and per chlorophyll a, the number of photosystem I per chlorophyll a, and the chlorophyll a fraction not bound to the photosystems and IsiA.
Address Departement de Geomatique Appliquee, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC J1K 2R1, Canada
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Oxford Journals Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0142-7873 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (up) Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 352
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Author Dunnett, O,
Title Contested landscapes: the moral geographies of light pollution in Britain Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Cultural Geographies Abbreviated Journal Cultural Geographies
Volume 22 Issue 4 Pages 619-636
Keywords Light pollution; geography; darkness; moral geographies; urbanization
Abstract This paper considers the concept of light pollution and its connections to moral geographies of landscape in Britain. The paper aims to provide a greater understanding of light pollution in the present day, where the issue connects to policy debates about energy efficiency, crime, health, ecology and night time aesthetics, whilst also engaging with new areas of research in cultural geography. The main sources of investigation are the Campaign to Protect Rural England and the British Astronomical Association’s Campaign for Dark Skies (est. 1990). Using interviews, archival and textual analysis, the paper examines this anti-light-pollution lobby, looking at the lead-up to the formation of the Campaign as well as its ongoing influence. A moral geography of light pollution is identified, drawing on two interconnected discourses – a notion of the ‘astronomical sublime’ and the problem of urbanization. Whilst the former is often invoked, both through visual and linguistic means, by anti-light pollution campaigners, the latter is characterized as a threat to clear night skies, echoing earlier protests against urban sprawl. Complementing a growing area of research, the geographies of light and darkness, this paper considers the light pollution lobby as a way of investigating the fundamental relationship between humankind and the cosmos in the modern age.
Address School of Geography, Archaeology and Palaeoecology, Elmwood Avenue, Belfast BT7 1NN, UK
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher SAGE Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (up) Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 353
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Author Gallaway, T.
Title On Light Pollution, Passive Pleasures, and the Instrumental Value of Beauty Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication Journal of Economic Issues Abbreviated Journal Journal of Economic Issues
Volume 44 Issue 1 Pages 71-88
Keywords ecomonics; skyglow
Abstract The night sky is a unique and exquisitely valuable cultural asset that is being lost to humanity. Light pollution obscures the heavens, interferes with wildlife, and wastes billions of dollars in energy annually. Light pollution can be easily mitigated, but unfortunately, it has gone largely unnoticed as a preventable environmental problem. This paper examines light pollution as well as the value of the night sky. The paper focuses on society's disregard for the loss of a cultural asset that has been a part of art, science, and culture for as long as these things have existed. It argues that the blame lies largely in an inability to articulate adequately the value of natural beauty. It is further argued that such beauty has instrumental value, and the explicit recognition of this value is an important step toward preserving the night sky and other objects of natural beauty.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0021-3624 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (up) Approved no
Call Number NwU @ megan.albaugh @ Serial 356
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Author Wahl, F.; Kantermann, T.; Amft, O.
Title How much Light do you get? Estimating Daily Light Exposure using Smartphones Type Conference Article
Year 2014 Publication Proceedings of the 2014 ACM International Symposium on Wearable Computers Abbreviated Journal Proc. of the 2014 ACM International Symposium on Wearable Computers
Volume n/a Issue n/a Pages 43-46
Keywords Instrumentation; light exposure; context inference, light intensity; light intake; circadian clock; circadian rhythm; mobile sensing
Abstract We present an approach to estimate a persons light exposure using smartphones. We used web-sourced weather reports combined with smartphone light sensor data, time of day, and indoor/outdoor information, to estimate illuminance around the user throughout a day. Since light dominates every human’s circadian rhythm and influences the sleep-wake cycle, we developed a smartphone-based system that does not re- quire additional sensors for illuminance estimation. To evaluate our approach, we conducted a free-living study with 12 users, each carrying a smartphone, a head-mounted light reference sensor, and a wrist-worn light sensing device for six consecutive days. Estimated light values were compared to the head-mounted reference, the wrist-worn device and a mean value estimate. Our results show that illuminance could be estimated at less than 20% error for all study participants, outperforming the wrist-worn device. In 9 out of 12 participants the estimation deviated less than 10% from the reference measurements.
Address ACTLab, Chair of Sensor Technology, University of Passau (florian.wahl@uni-passau.de)
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher ACM Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (up) Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1206
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