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Author Gallaway, T.
Title On Light Pollution, Passive Pleasures, and the Instrumental Value of Beauty Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication Journal of Economic Issues Abbreviated Journal Journal of Economic Issues
Volume 44 Issue 1 Pages 71-88
Keywords ecomonics; skyglow
Abstract The night sky is a unique and exquisitely valuable cultural asset that is being lost to humanity. Light pollution obscures the heavens, interferes with wildlife, and wastes billions of dollars in energy annually. Light pollution can be easily mitigated, but unfortunately, it has gone largely unnoticed as a preventable environmental problem. This paper examines light pollution as well as the value of the night sky. The paper focuses on society's disregard for the loss of a cultural asset that has been a part of art, science, and culture for as long as these things have existed. It argues that the blame lies largely in an inability to articulate adequately the value of natural beauty. It is further argued that such beauty has instrumental value, and the explicit recognition of this value is an important step toward preserving the night sky and other objects of natural beauty.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0021-3624 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (up) Approved no
Call Number NwU @ megan.albaugh @ Serial 356
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Author Wahl, F.; Kantermann, T.; Amft, O.
Title How much Light do you get? Estimating Daily Light Exposure using Smartphones Type Conference Article
Year 2014 Publication Proceedings of the 2014 ACM International Symposium on Wearable Computers Abbreviated Journal Proc. of the 2014 ACM International Symposium on Wearable Computers
Volume n/a Issue n/a Pages 43-46
Keywords Instrumentation; light exposure; context inference, light intensity; light intake; circadian clock; circadian rhythm; mobile sensing
Abstract We present an approach to estimate a persons light exposure using smartphones. We used web-sourced weather reports combined with smartphone light sensor data, time of day, and indoor/outdoor information, to estimate illuminance around the user throughout a day. Since light dominates every human’s circadian rhythm and influences the sleep-wake cycle, we developed a smartphone-based system that does not re- quire additional sensors for illuminance estimation. To evaluate our approach, we conducted a free-living study with 12 users, each carrying a smartphone, a head-mounted light reference sensor, and a wrist-worn light sensing device for six consecutive days. Estimated light values were compared to the head-mounted reference, the wrist-worn device and a mean value estimate. Our results show that illuminance could be estimated at less than 20% error for all study participants, outperforming the wrist-worn device. In 9 out of 12 participants the estimation deviated less than 10% from the reference measurements.
Address ACTLab, Chair of Sensor Technology, University of Passau (florian.wahl@uni-passau.de)
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher ACM Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
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ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (up) Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1206
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Author Kaniewska, P.; Alon, S.; Karako-Lampert, S.; Hoegh-Guldberg, O.; Levy, O.
Title Signaling cascades and the importance of moonlight in coral broadcast mass spawning Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication eLife Abbreviated Journal
Volume 4 Issue Pages e09991
Keywords Animals; coral; chronobiology; reproductive strategies; reproductive synchronization; Great Barrier Reef; neurohormones; marine; oceans; invertebrates
Abstract Many reef-building corals participate in a mass-spawning event that occurs yearly on the Great Barrier Reef. This coral reproductive event is one of earth's most prominent examples of synchronised behavior, and coral reproductive success is vital to the persistence of coral reef ecosystems. Although several environmental cues have been implicated in the timing of mass spawning, the specific sensory cues that function together with endogenous clock mechanisms to ensure accurate timing of gamete release are largely unknown. Here, we show that moonlight is an important external stimulus for mass spawning synchrony and describe the potential mechanisms underlying the ability of corals to detect environmental triggers for the signaling cascades that ultimately result in gamete release. Our study increases the understanding of reproductive chronobiology in corals and strongly supports the hypothesis that coral gamete release is achieved by a complex array of potential neurohormones and light-sensing molecules.
Address Global Change Institute and ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Australia; oveh(at)uq.edu.au
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher eLife Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2050-084X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (up) Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1321
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Author Posudin, Y.
Title Measurement of Light Pollution Type Book Chapter
Year 2014 Publication Methods of Measuring Environmental Parameters Abbreviated Journal
Volume Chapter 33 Issue Pages
Keywords Bortle scale; digital photography; light pollution; portable spectrophotometer; sky quality meter; SQM
Abstract Digital photography is based on the conversion of light by sensitive matrix (array of electronic photodetectors) to capture the image which is then digitized and stored as a computer file for further processing and printing. The spectral sensitivity of the cameras is in good agreement with the spectrum of action of the photosensitive hormone melatonin. Digital photography can be used to quantify light pollution acting on the physiology of living organisms. The chapter discusses the principles of spectrophotometry. A portable spectrophotometer for the measurement of light pollution is proposed by Cinzano. It consists of a cooled CCD camera and a small spectrographic head which is equipped with a De Amici prism composed of two external crown prisms and an inner Flint prism. Sky quality meter (SQM) is a portable photometer for measuring sky brightness and for light pollution monitoring. This device collects the light from a wide solid angle.
Address Department of Physics, National University of Life and Environmental Sciences, Ukraine
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (up) Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 359
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Author Loveridge, A.; Duell, R.; Abbari, J.; Moffatt, M.
Title Night Landscapes: A Challenge to World Heritage Protocols Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Landscape Review Abbreviated Journal Landscape Rev.
Volume 15 Issue 1 Pages 64-75
Keywords land management; starlight reserve; dark sky reserve; International Dark Sky Association; world heritage; landscape; parks
Abstract Starlight reserves are a relatively new concept whose definition and management protocols have come about in an era when understandings of human relationships with nature are dynamic and infused with cultural meaning. Rather than assuming that pristine nature can be sealed off from human influences, World Heritage guidelines now accept that our experience of nature may be enriched by attention to the multifunctional landscape, in which a blend of aesthetic, historical, cultural, scientific and environmental elements are carefully presented to tourists. Observatories and clear night skies are ideal sites for such an interface, and the loss of dark skies has led to new systems of audit aimed at their preservation. This

study of the potential for a World Heritage Site in the Mackenzie Basin, in the South Island of New Zealand, grounds the interaction between World Heritage goals and management of land use in a place where exceptional sky quality and competing land uses challenge multiple stakeholders to rethink their concepts of landscape
Address Department of Sociology, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, Aotearoa New Zealand.
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
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Notes (up) Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 360
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