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Author Polak, T.; Korine, C.; Yair, S.; Holderied, M.W.
Title Differential effects of artificial lighting on flight and foraging behaviour of two sympatric bat species in a desert: Light pollution in deserts and bat foraging Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Journal of Zoology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 285 Issue 1 Pages 21-27
Keywords ight pollution; desert bats; Eptesicus bottae; flight behaviour; Pipistrellus kuhlii; animals; mammals; bats
Abstract Human habitation in deserts can create rich novel resources that may be used by native desert species. However, at night such resources may lose attractiveness when they are in artificially lit areas. For bats, attraction to such manmade habitats might be species specific. In an isolated village in the Negev desert that is known for its high bat activity we investigated the effects of artificial lighting on flight behaviour of two aerial insectivorous bat species: Pipistrellus kuhlii, a non-desert synanthropic bat, common in urban environments and Eptesicus bottae, a desert-dwelling species. Using an acoustic tracking system we reconstructed flight trajectories for bats that flew under artificial lights [Light treatment (L)] versus in natural darkness [Dark treatment (D)]. Under L both P. kuhlii and E. bottae flew significantly faster than under D. Under L, P. kuhlii also flew at significantly lower altitude (i.e. away from a floodlight) than under D. Whereas P. kuhlii foraged both in L and D, E. bottae only foraged in D. In L, activity of E. bottae decreased and it merely transited the illuminated area at commuting rather than foraging speed. Thus, under artificially lighted conditions the non-desert synanthropic species may have a competitive advantage over the native desert species and may outcompete it for aerial insect prey. Controlling light pollution in deserts and keeping important foraging sites unlit may reduce the synanthropic species' competitive advantage over native desert bats.
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ISSN 0952-8369 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (up) Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 99
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Author Komada, Y.; Aoki, K.; Gohshi, S.; Ichioka, H.; Shibata, S.
Title Effects of television luminance and wavelength at habitual bedtime on melatonin and cortisol secretion in humans: Blue light and melatonin secretion Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Sleep and Biological Rhythms Abbreviated Journal Sleep and Biological Rhythms
Volume 13 Issue 4 Pages 316–322
Keywords Human Health
Abstract The aim of this study was to examine the effect of exposure to different types of television displays at habitual bedtime on human melatonin and cortisol secretion. Thirteen male participants (mean age: 22.7 ± 0.85 years) were tested over three nights in one baseline and two experimental sessions. Participants were instructed to watch a movie on four different luminance- and wavelength-controlled television displays: normal luminance (450 candela [cd]/m2) or high luminance (1200 cd/m2) and normal blue light or half blue light. Salivary melatonin and cortisol levels were measured at two time points before and after television viewing. There was no significant difference in cortisol secretion due to the different displays. Melatonin suppression was significantly lower following the exposure to the half-blue light display compared with the normal blue light display. These results suggest that the use of half-blue light displays during night time may prevent circadian rhythm dysfunction.
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ISSN 1446-9235 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (up) Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1149
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Author Levin, N.; Kark, S.; Crandall, D.
Title Where have all the people gone? Enhancing global conservation using night lights and social media Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Ecological Applications Abbreviated Journal Ecological Applications
Volume 25 Issue 8 Pages 2153–2167
Keywords Remote Sensing
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ISSN 1051-0761 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (up) Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1150
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Author Hu, C.; Chen, S.; Wang, M.; Murch, B.; Taylor, J.
Title Detecting surface oil slicks using VIIRS nighttime imagery under moon glint: a case study in the Gulf of Mexico Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Remote Sensing Letters Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing Letters
Volume 6 Issue 4 Pages 295-301
Keywords Remote Sensing
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ISSN 2150-704X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (up) Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1151
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Author Meyer, L.A.; Sullivan, S.M.P.
Title Bright lights, big city: influences of ecological light pollution on reciprocal stream-riparian invertebrate fluxes Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Ecological Applications Abbreviated Journal Ecological Applications
Volume 23 Issue 6 Pages 1322-1330
Keywords ecological light pollution; ecosystem function; stream–riparian invertebrate fluxes; tetragnathid spiders; urban streams
Abstract Cities produce considerable ecological light pollution (ELP), yet the effects of artificial night lighting on biological communities and ecosystem function have not been fully explored. From June 2010 to June 2011, we surveyed aquatic emergent insects, riparian arthropods entering the water, and riparian spiders of the family Tetragnathidae at nine stream reaches representing common ambient ELP levels of Columbus, Ohio, USA, streams (low, 0.1–0.5 lux; moderate, 0.6–2.0 lux; high, 2.1–4.0 lux). In August 2011, we experimentally increased light levels at the low- and moderate-treatment reaches to 10–12 lux to represent urban streams exposed to extremely high levels of ELP. Although season exerted the dominant influence on invertebrate fluxes over the course of the year, when analyzed by season, we found that light strongly influenced multiple invertebrate responses. The experimental light addition resulted in a 44% decrease in tetragnathid spider density (P = 0.035), decreases of 16% in family richness (P = 0.040) and 76% in mean body size (P = 0.022) of aquatic emergent insects, and a 309% increase in mean body size of terrestrial arthropods (P = 0.015). Our results provide evidence that artificial light sources can alter community structure and ecosystem function in streams via changes in reciprocal aquatic–terrestrial fluxes of invertebrates.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1051-0761 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (up) Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 102
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