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Author Zukauskas, A.; Vaicekauskas, R.; Tuzikas, A.; Petrulis, A.; Stanikunas, R.; Svegzda, A.; Eidikas, P.; Vitta, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Firelight LED Source: Toward a Balanced Approach to the Performance of Solid-State Lighting for Outdoor Environments Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication IEEE Photonics Journal Abbreviated Journal IEEE Photonics J.  
  Volume 6 Issue 3 Pages 1-16  
  Keywords LED; lighting; lighting technology; light emitting diode; firelight LED  
  Abstract We report on a blue-amber (“firelight”) cluster of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with extra-low correlated color temperature (~1860 K) optimized for outdoor lighting under mesopic conditions. When compared with common white LEDs, the firelight LED cluster shows considerably reduced indexes of melatonin suppression and skyglow, increased retinal illuminance for elderly people, but a reduced performance of perceiving colors, which, however, can be tolerated at mesopic luminance. In comparison with an almost metameric high-pressure sodium lamp, the cluster exhibits a potentially higher luminous efficacy, similar reaction time and detection threshold of luminance contrasts for achromatic targets, and noticeably improved color discrimination characteristics.  
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  ISSN 1943-0655 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 281  
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Author Jou, J.-H.; Hsieh, C.-Y.; Tseng, J.-R.; Peng, S.-H.; Jou, Y.-C.; Hong, J.H.; Shen, S.-M.; Tang, M.-C.; Chen, P.-C.; Lin, C.-H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Candle Light-Style Organic Light-Emitting Diodes Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Advanced Functional Materials Abbreviated Journal Adv. Funct. Mater.  
  Volume 23 Issue 21 Pages 2750-2757  
  Keywords organic light emitting diodes; candle light; firelight; OLED; CRI; color rendition  
  Abstract In response to the call for a physiologically-friendly light at night that shows low color temperature, a candle light-style organic light emitting diode (OLED) is developed with a color temperature as low as 1900 K, a color rendering index (CRI) as high as 93, and an efficacy at least two times that of incandescent bulbs. In addition, the device has a 80% resemblance in luminance spectrum to that of a candle. Most importantly, the sensationally warm candle light-style emission is driven by electricity in lieu of the energy-wasting and greenhouse gas emitting hydrocarbon-burning candles invented 5000 years ago. This candle light-style OLED may serve as a safe measure for illumination at night. Moreover, it has a high color rendering index with a decent efficiency.  
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  ISSN 1616301X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 284  
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Author Boyce, P.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Review: The Impact of Light in Buildings on Human Health Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Indoor and Built Environment Abbreviated Journal Indoor and Built Environment  
  Volume 19 Issue 1 Pages 8-20  
  Keywords Human Health; indoor light; circadian disruption; shift work; oncogenesis; Review  
  Abstract The effects of light on health can be divided into three sections. The first is that of light as radiation. Exposure to the ultraviolet, visible, and infrared radiation produced by light sources can damage both the eye and skin, through both thermal and photochemical mechanisms. Such damage is rare for indoor lighting installations designed for vision but can occur in some situations. The second is light operating through the visual system. Lighting enables us to see but lighting conditions that cause visual discomfort are likely to lead to eyestrain. Anyone who frequently experiences eyestrain is not enjoying the best of health. The lighting conditions that cause visual discomfort in buildings are well known and easily avoided. The third is light operating through the circadian system. This is known to influence sleep patterns and believed to be linked to the development of breast cancer among night shift workers. There is still much to learn about the impact of light on human health but what is known is enough to ensure that the topic requires the attention of all those concerned with the lighting of buildings.  
  Address Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, New York, USA  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1420-326X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 292  
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Author Semeniuk, Kent (ed) pdf  url
openurl 
  Title Gazing Up: An Exploration of Municipal Night Lighting Practices Amongst Six Canadian Municipalities Type Manuscript
  Year 2014 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords light pollution; public policy; Canada; outdoor lighting; municipal  
  Abstract Light pollution is broadly defined as the unnecessary illumination of the nocturnal environment. Light pollution is a pervasive phenomena shown to have harmful consequences for both the biotic and abiotic components of an ecosystem. While some municipalities have begun to address the environmental and economic costs of light pollution, most have not. The goal of this study was to investigate current municipal night lighting practices for six selected Canadian municipalities with the aim of determining their policies and practices for night lighting. Semi-structured interviews with key informants were conducted and analyzed using a mixed methods approach that included a thorough literature review. The results indicate that rising energy costs, aging infrastructure and the lighting industry are driving the majority of changes taking place in adapting municipalities while most municipalities remain content with status quo. The research conducted led to guideline improvements for municipal night lighting in today’s municipalities.  
  Address School of Environmental Design and Rural Development, University of Guelph  
  Corporate Author Thesis Master's thesis  
  Publisher University of Guelph Place of Publication Guelph, Ontario Editor Semeniuk, Kent  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 305  
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Author van Geffen, K.G.; van Grunsven, R.H.A.; van Ruijven, J.; Berendse, F.; Veenendaal, E.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial light at night causes diapause inhibition and sex-specific life history changes in a moth Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Ecology and Evolution Abbreviated Journal Ecol Evol  
  Volume 4 Issue 11 Pages 2082–2089  
  Keywords Caterpillars; development time; diapause; light pollution; pupal mass; pupation; light exposure; light pollution; biology; moths; insects; Mamestra brassicae  
  Abstract Rapidly increasing levels of light pollution subject nocturnal organisms to major alterations of their habitat, the ecological consequences of which are largely unknown. Moths are well-known to be attracted to light at night, but effects of light on other aspects of moth ecology, such as larval development and life-history, remain unknown. Such effects may have important consequences for fitness and thus for moth population sizes. To study the effects of artificial night lighting on development and life-history of moths, we experimentally subjected Mamestra brassicae (Noctuidae) caterpillars to low intensity green, white, red or no artificial light at night and determined their growth rate, maximum caterpillar mass, age at pupation, pupal mass and pupation duration. We found sex-specific effects of artificial light on caterpillar life-history, with male caterpillars subjected to green and white light reaching a lower maximum mass, pupating earlier and obtaining a lower pupal mass than male caterpillars under red light or in darkness. These effects can have major implications for fitness, but were absent in female caterpillars. Moreover, by the time that the first adult moth from the dark control treatment emerged from its pupa (after 110 days), about 85% of the moths that were under green light and 83% of the moths that were under white light had already emerged. These differences in pupation duration occurred in both sexes and were highly significant, and likely result from diapause inhibition by artificial night lighting. We conclude that low levels of nocturnal illumination can disrupt life-histories in moths and inhibit the initiation of pupal diapause. This may result in reduced fitness and increased mortality. The application of red light, instead of white or green light, might be an appropriate measure to mitigate negative artificial light effects on moth life history.  
  Address 1 Nature Conservation and Plant Ecology Group, Wageningen University, Droevendaalsesteeg 3a, P.O. box 47, 6700 AA, Wageningen, the Netherlands  
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  ISSN 2045-7758 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 306  
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