|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Suter, P.M.
Title Gedanken zu Licht und Schlaf [Thoughts about Light and Sleep] Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Praxis Abbreviated Journal Praxis (Bern 1994)
Volume 108 Issue 2 Pages 139-143
Keywords Commentary; Human Health
Abstract Many aspects of health and disease are mainly determined by the constant change between light and darkness during a solar day. The resulting physiological rhythms correspond to the circadian rhythm, which was one of the most central drivers in the evolution of humans. However, over the last 20-30 years, these natural rhythms of the change of light and darkness are being increasingly ignored by modern societies. It is well known that these rhythms are modulators of many physiological pathways and any desynchronization or misalignment will activate different pathophysiological pathways, which contribute to the risk of chronic diseases. Light pollution by widespread illumination of our environment and the night sky and uncontrolled man-made use of any light source plays a key role in the pathogenesis of sleep disturbances. Blue light exposure in the evening from any artificial light source (especially from electronic device screens) is of special relevance in this context. In this article a few key facts concerning light, sleep and diseases are presented. We should by all means account for the effects of light and darkness and stop any further light pollution.

//

Unser Leben wird durch die sich rhythmisch abwechselnde Helligkeit und Dunkelheit während eines «Solartages» bestimmt, was die Grundlage für den zirkadianen Rhythmus darstellt. Dies war Millionen von Jahren so, und erst in den vergangenen 20–30 Jahren wird diese Rhythmik infolge einer ubiquitären Verwendung von Licht zunehmend ignoriert. Die zirkadiane Rhythmik stellt allerdings eine der zentralsten Determinanten für Gesundheit und Krankheit dar, und man weiss, dass eine Abweichung vom bzw. Desynchronisation des normalen Rhythmus ein hohes pathophysiologisches Potenzial hat und in der Pathogenese der meisten chronischen Erkrankungen eine zentrale Rolle spielt. Die exzessive Beleuchtung der Umgebung und des Nachthimmels wird als Lichtverschmutzung oder «Light Pollution» bezeichnet, die sich unter anderem auch in Schlafstörungen manifestiert. Dabei darf im Besonderen das blaue Licht aus künstlichen Lichtquellen und Bildschirmen am Abend bei der Entstehung von Schlafstörungen nicht ausser Betracht gelassen werden. In diesem Artikel werden einige Aspekte zum Thema Licht, Schlaf und Gesundheit in Erinnerung gerufen und praxisrelevante Zusammenhänge aufgezeigt. Eine Kontrolle der Lichtverschmutzung ist dringend angezeigt.
Address 1 Medizinische Poliklinik, Klinik und Poliklinik fur Innere Medizin, Universitatsspital Zurich
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language German Summary Language Original Title (down) Mach nicht zu viel <<blau>>
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1661-8157 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30722742 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2205
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Pipia, L.; Alamús, R.; Tardà, A.; Pérez-Aragüés, F.; Palà, V.; Corbera, J.; Arnaldich, J.
Title Generación de mapas de luminancia urbana a partir de un sensor hiperespectral VNIR y una cámara fotogramétrica digital Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Revista de Teledetección Abbreviated Journal Rev. Teledetec.
Volume Issue 47 Pages 85
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract This paper puts forward a methodology for the generation of high resolution luminance maps from simultaneous hyperspectral VNIR and photogrammetric imagery. The integration of hyperspectral radiance at ground level, properly weighted by the photopic-based coefficients, plus a sensor fusion strategy, provides for the first time a quantitative description of the luminous flux at high spatial resolution and with multi-angle geometry. Accordingly, this methodology allows following up any strategic policy aimed to improve urban illumination management and quantifying its effects in terms of energetic efficiency.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Spanish Summary Language Original Title (down) Generación de mapas de luminancia urbana a partir de un sensor hiperespectral VNIR y una cámara fotogramétrica digital
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1133-0953 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1616
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Columella, L.J.M.
Title Of husbandry Type Journal Article
Year 70 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Book 9 Issue Pages
Keywords Animals
Abstract Excerpt from Chapter 14, page 409 in the linked English translation:

...Therefore, at the time when the mallows blossom, when there is the greatest multitude of these butterflies, if a high brazen vessel, with a narrow neck like the mile-column, be placed in the evening among the bee-hives, and some light put down to the bottom of it, the butterflies gather together to it from all places; and, while they flutter about the small flame, they are scorched, because they can neither fly easily upward out of the narrow place, nor, on the other hand, can they retire at a greater distance from the fire, since they are surrounded by the sides of the brazen vessel: therefore they are consumed by the burning heat that is near them...
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Latin Summary Language English Original Title (down) De re rustica
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2578
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Navara, K.J.; Nelson, R.J.
Title The dark side of light at night: physiological, epidemiological, and ecological consequences Type Journal Article
Year 2007 Publication Journal of Pineal Research Abbreviated Journal J Pineal Res
Volume 43 Issue 3 Pages 215-224
Keywords Animals; Biological Clocks; *Darkness; Disease; Ecology; Humans; Oxidative Stress; Work
Abstract Organisms must adapt to the temporal characteristics of their surroundings to successfully survive and reproduce. Variation in the daily light cycle, for example, acts through endocrine and neurobiological mechanisms to control several downstream physiological and behavioral processes. Interruptions in normal circadian light cycles and the resulting disruption of normal melatonin rhythms cause widespread disruptive effects involving multiple body systems, the results of which can have serious medical consequences for individuals, as well as large-scale ecological implications for populations. With the invention of electrical lights about a century ago, the temporal organization of the environment has been drastically altered for many species, including humans. In addition to the incidental exposure to light at night through light pollution, humans also engage in increasing amounts of shift-work, resulting in repeated and often long-term circadian disruption. The increasing prevalence of exposure to light at night has significant social, ecological, behavioral, and health consequences that are only now becoming apparent. This review addresses the complicated web of potential behavioral and physiological consequences resulting from exposure to light at night, as well as the large-scale medical and ecological implications that may result.
Address Department of Psychology, Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA. knavara@gmail.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title (down)
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-3098 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:17803517 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 17
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Gerrish, G.A.; Morin, J.G.; Rivers, T.J.; Patrawala, Z.
Title Darkness as an ecological resource: the role of light in partitioning the nocturnal niche Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication Oecologia Abbreviated Journal Oecologia
Volume 160 Issue 3 Pages 525-536
Keywords Age Factors; Animals; Belize; Crustacea/*physiology; *Darkness; *Ecosystem; Feeding Behavior/physiology; Linear Models; Motor Activity/*physiology; Photoperiod; Sexual Behavior, Animal/physiology; Water Movements
Abstract Nocturnal behaviors that vary as a function of light intensity, either from the setting sun or the moon, are typically labeled as circadian or circalunar. Both of these terms refer to endogenous time-dependent behaviors. In contrast, the nightly reproductive and feeding behaviors of Vargula annecohenae, a bioluminescent ostracod (Arthropoda: Crustacea) fluctuate in response to light intensity, an exogenous factor that is not strictly time-dependent. We measured adult and juvenile activity of V. annecohenae throughout lunar cycles in January/February and June 2003. Overnight and nightly measurements of foraging and reproductive behavior of adult V. annecohenae indicated that activity was greatest when a critical “dark threshold” was reached and that the dark threshold for adult V. annecohenae is met when less than a third of the moon is visible or at the intensity of light 2-3 min before the start of nautical twilight when no moon is illuminated. Juvenile V. annecohenae were also nocturnally active but demonstrated little or no response to lunar illumination, remaining active even during brightly moonlit periods. In addition to light level, water velocity also influenced the behaviors of V. annecohenae, with fewer juveniles and adults actively foraging on nights when water velocity was high (>25 cm/s). Our data demonstrate that the strongest environmental factor influencing adult feeding and reproductive behaviors of V. annecohenae is the availability of time when illumination is below the critical dark threshold. This dependence on darkness for successful growth and reproduction allows us to classify darkness as a resource, in the same way that the term has been applied to time, space and temperature.
Address Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850, USA. ggerrish@nd.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title (down)
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0029-8549 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:19330516 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 16
Permanent link to this record