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Author Fritsches, K.A.
Title Australian Loggerhead sea turtle hatchlings do not avoid yellow Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Marine and Freshwater Behaviour and Physiology Abbreviated Journal Marine and Freshwater Behaviour and Physiology
Volume 45 Issue 2 Pages 79-89
Keywords Flatback turtle; Natator depressus; animals; reptiles; marine turtles; turtles; Loggerhead turtle; Caretta caretta
Abstract When emerging from the nest, sea turtle hatchlings primarily orient using visual stimuli, with light pollution known to disrupt effective sea localization behavior. Previous studies have shown that sea turtle hatchlings respond differently to different wavelengths of light but Loggerhead hatchlings, exclusively among species tested, have a strong aversion to yellow light (at 600 nm). This study repeats these experiments with an Australian population of Loggerhead hatchlings (Caretta caretta) and Flatback hatchlings (Natator depressus). The orientation preference was measured using a modified y-maze set-up with the animals response observed using an infrared camera. This study showed that both Loggerhead and Flatback hatchlings can see and are attracted to light in the ultraviolet waveband (365 nm) and, to a lesser extent to longer wavelengths of 600 nm and above. The surprising finding was that the Loggerhead hatchlings tested here, unlike their conspecifics in Florida, do not show any avoidance to yellow but are attracted to bright lights of wavelength between 365 nm (UV) and 600 nm. This suggests potential differences in the visual behavior among different populations of sea turtles of the same species. No difference was detected in the response of Loggerhead hatchlings to flickering or steady light stimuli.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1023-6244 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 75
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Author Zheleva, M.
Title The dark side of light. Light pollution kills leatherback turtle hatchlings Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Biodiscovery Abbreviated Journal Biodiscovery
Volume 3 Issue Pages e8930
Keywords Leatherback turtle; animals; reptiles; turtles; marine turtles; light pollution; Tobago
Abstract The leatherback turtle is the largest and most migratory of all sea turtles and deepest diving air-breathing animal. It has unique physiology which allows it to adapt to various habitats ranging from sub-polar to equatorial during its migrations. The leatherback turtle is also the only sea turtle where no cases of tumours have been diagnosed. These unique features add to the arguments for preservation of this endangered species. Here we discuss the effect of light pollution on leatherback turtle hatchlings in Tobago and the measures for their protection.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2050-2966 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 76
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Author Lorne, J.; Salmon, M.
Title Effects of exposure to artificial lighting on orientation of hatchling sea turtles on the beach and in the ocean Type Journal Article
Year 2007 Publication Endangered Species Research Abbreviated Journal Endang. Species Res.
Volume 3 Issue Pages 23-30
Keywords Sea-finding · Orientation; Migration; Sea turtle; Loggerhead turtle; Caretta caretta; Photopollution; animals; turtles; marine turtles; reptiles
Abstract Artificial lighting disrupts sea turtle hatchling orientation from the nest to the sea. We studied how a light-induced landward crawl affects the later ability of hatchlings to crawl to the sea, and to swim away from the shore from a dark beach. A brief (2 min) landward crawl had no effect on swimming orientation as long as surface waves were present. In a calm sea, landward-crawling hatchlings failed to swim offshore, while those crawling seaward were well oriented. A long (2 h) crawl toward a landward light source, however, impaired the ability of hatchlings to crawl seaward. These results demonstrate that orientation toward artificial light sources compromises the ability of hatchlings to respond to natural orientation cues, both on land and in the sea. Based on these results, we suggest several changes to current management practices used when releasing misoriented turtles in the wild.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1863-5407 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 77
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Author Sella, K.N.; Salmon, M.; Witherington, B.E.
Title Filtered Streetlights Attract Hatchling Marine Turtles Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication Chelonian Conservation and Biology Abbreviated Journal Chelonian Conservation and Biology
Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 255-261
Keywords Reptilia; Testudines; Cheloniidae; Loggerhead turtle; turtles; marine turtles; reptiles; Caretta caretta; Chelonia mydas; hatchlings; artificial lighting; light “trapping”; orientation; seafinding; Florida
Abstract On many nesting beaches, hatchling marine turtles are exposed to poled street lighting that disrupts their ability to crawl to the sea. Experiments were done to determine how hatchlings responded to street lighting transmitted through 2 filters that excluded the most disruptive wavelengths (those <&#8201;530 nm; those <&#8201;570 nm). Filtered lighting, however, also attracted the turtles though not as strongly as an unfiltered (high-pressure sodium vapor) lighting. Filtering is therefore of limited utility for light management, especially since other alternatives (such as lowering, shielding, or turning off unnecessary lighting; use of dimmer lights embedded in roadways) are more effective.
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Publisher Place of Publication (down) Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1071-8443 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 78
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Author Tuxbury, S.M.; Salmon, M.
Title Competitive interactions between artificial lighting and natural cues during seafinding by hatchling marine turtles Type Journal Article
Year 2005 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal Biological Conservation
Volume 121 Issue 2 Pages 311-316
Keywords Sea turtle; Orientation; Photopollution; Habitat restoration; animals; reptiles; marine turtles; conservation
Abstract Artificial lighting disrupts the nocturnal orientation of sea turtle hatchlings as they crawl from their nest to the ocean. Laboratory experiments in an arena were used to simultaneously present artificial light (that attracted the turtles toward “land”) and natural cues (a dark silhouette of the dune behind the beach) that promoted “seaward” orientation. Artificial lighting disrupted seaward crawling in the presence of low silhouettes, but not high silhouettes. Low silhouettes provided adequate cues for seaward crawling when the apparent brightness of artificial light was reduced. Based upon these results, we postulate that artificial light disrupts orientation by competing with natural cues. Current restoration practices at nesting beaches emphasize light reduction. However at many sites some lights cannot be modified. Our results suggest that pairing dune restoration (to enhance natural cues) with light reduction (to the extent possible) should significantly improve hatchling orientation, even at nesting beaches where lighting cannot be entirely eliminated.
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Publisher Place of Publication (down) Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 79
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