|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Hölker, F.; Wolter, C.; Perkin, E.K.; Tockner, K.
Title Light pollution as a biodiversity threat Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication Trends in Ecology & Evolution Abbreviated Journal Trends Ecol Evol
Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages 681-682
Keywords *Biodiversity; Biological Clocks; Biological Evolution; Ecosystem; *Environmental Monitoring; *Environmental Pollutants; Light/*adverse effects
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication (down) Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0169-5347 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:21035893 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 36
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Schoech, S.J.; Bowman, R.; Hahn, T.P.; Goymann, W.; Schwabl, I.; Bridge, E.S.
Title The effects of low levels of light at night upon the endocrine physiology of western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part A, Ecological Genetics and Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Zool A Ecol Genet Physiol
Volume 319 Issue 9 Pages 527-538
Keywords Animals; Corticosterone/blood; Ecosystem; Female; *Light; Male; Melatonin/blood; Passeriformes/*physiology; *Photoperiod; Reproduction/*physiology; Testosterone/blood
Abstract Florida scrub-jays (Aphelocoma coerulescens) in the suburbs breed earlier than jays in native habitat. Amongst the possible factors that influence this advance (e.g., food availability, microclimate, predator regime, etc.), is exposure to artificial lights at night (LAN). LAN could stimulate the reproductive axis of the suburban jays. Alternatively, LAN could inhibit pineal melatonin (MEL), thus removing its inhibitory influence on the reproductive axis. Because Florida scrub-jays are a threatened species, we used western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) to investigate the effects of LAN upon reproductive hormones and melatonin. Jays were held under conditions in which the dark-phase of the light:dark cycle was without illumination and then under low levels of LAN. Under both conditions, birds were exposed first to short-days (9.5L:14.5D) that were gradually increased to long-days (14.5L:9.5D). At various times, blood samples were collected during the light part of the cycle to measure reproductive hormones (luteinizing hormone, LH; testosterone, T; and estradiol, E2 ). Similarly, samples to assess melatonin were collected during the dark. In males, LAN caused a depression in LH levels and levels were approximately 4x greater under long- than short-days. In females, there was no effect of LAN or photoperiod upon LH. LAN resulted in depressed T levels in females, although there was no effect on T in males. E2 levels in both sexes were lower under LAN than under an unlighted dark-phase. Paradoxically, MEL was higher in jays under LAN, and under long-days. MEL did not differ by sex. LAN disrupted the extraordinarily strong correlation between T and E2 that existed under unlighted nocturnal conditions. Overall, our findings fail to support the hypothesis that LAN stimulates the reproductive axis. Rather, the data demonstrate that LAN tends to inhibit reproductive hormone secretion, although not in a consistent fashion between the sexes.
Address Department of Biological Sciences, University of Memphis, Memphis, Tennessee
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication (down) Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1932-5223 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23970442 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 37
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Rodrí­guez, A.; Rodrí­guez, B.; Lucas, M.P.
Title Trends in numbers of petrels attracted to artificial lights suggest population declines in Tenerife, Canary Islands Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Ibis Abbreviated Journal
Volume 154 Issue 1 Pages 167-172
Keywords Animals; birds; petrels; Cory's shearwater; Calonectris diomedea; Bulwer's Petrel; Bulweria bulwerii; Macaronesian Shearwater; Puffinus baroli; reproductive strategies
Abstract The secretive breeding behaviour of petrels makes monitoring their breeding populations challenging. To assess population trends of Cory's Shearwater Calonectris diomedea, Bulwer's Petrel Bulweria bulwerii and Macaronesian Shearwater Puffinus baroli in Tenerife from 1990 to 2010, we used data from rescue campaigns that aim to reduce the mortality of fledgling petrels attracted to artificial lights as proxies for trends in breeding population size. Despite increases in human population size and light pollution, the number of rescued fledglings of Cory's Shearwater and Bulwer's Petrel increased and remained stable, respectively, whereas numbers of rescued Macaronesian Shearwaters sharply declined. In the absence of more accurate population estimates, these results suggest a worrying decline in the Macaronesian Shearwater's breeding population.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication (down) Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0019-1019 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 38
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Filho, C.R.D.S.; Zullo Jr, J.; Elvidge, C.
Title Brazil's 2001 energy crisis monitored from space Type Journal Article
Year 2004 Publication International Journal of Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal International Journal of Remote Sensing
Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages 2475-2482
Keywords Remote Sensing; Energy
Abstract Data sensed by the US Air Force Defence Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS) during the years 2000 and 2001 in Brazil were tested as a tool to monitor reduction of nocturnal lighting. This particular timing was examined as the Brazilian population and industry were forced to reduce electric power consumption by 20% during 2001, in relation to 2000, for a period of several months, starting officially on 1 June 2001. Large urban agglomerates were compelled to switch off city lights by at least the same amount. The Distrito Federal (DF), including the Brazilian capital, Brasilia, was one of the primary areas where the government actively sought electric power consumption reductions. Using the DF as a study case, we demonstrate that the mean grey levels derived from averaging DMSP-OLS data acquired over urban centres appear to be a useful index to monitor relative oscillations in energy consumption.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication (down) Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0143-1161 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2362
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Miller, M.W.
Title Apparent Effects of Light Pollution on Singing Behavior of American Robins Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication The Condor Abbreviated Journal Condor
Volume 108 Issue 1 Pages 130
Keywords American Robin; birds; light pollution; morning chorus; dawn chorus; song; Turdus migratorius; animals; communication
Abstract Astronomers consider light pollution to be a growing problem, however few studies have addressed potential effects of light pollution on wildlife. Sunlight is believed to initiate song in many bird species. If light initiates song, then light pollution may be influencing avian song behavior at a population level. This hypothesis predicts that birds breeding in areas with large amounts of artificial light will begin singing earlier in the day than birds in areas with little artificial light. Birds in highly illuminated areas might begin singing earlier than did birds in those same areas in previous years when artificial light levels were known to be, or were presumably, lower. Also, birds should begin singing earlier within a site on brightly lit nights. In 2002 and 2003 I documented initiation of morning song by breeding American Robins (Turdus migratorius) in areas with differing intensity of artificial nocturnal light. I compared my observations among sites and against historical studies. Robin populations in areas with large amounts of artificial light frequently began their morning chorus during true night. Chorus initiation time, relative to civil twilight, was positively correlated with amount of artificial light present during true night. Robin choruses in areas with little, or presumably little, artificial light have almost never begun during true night, instead appearing to track the onset of civil twilight. Proliferation of artificial nocturnal light may be strongly affecting singing behavior of American Robins at a population level.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication (down) Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0010-5422 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 39
Permanent link to this record