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Author Lunn, R.M.; Blask, D.E.; Coogan, A.N.; Figueiro, M.G.; Gorman, M.R.; Hall, J.E.; Hansen, J.; Nelson, R.J.; Panda, S.; Smolensky, M.H.; Stevens, R.G.; Turek, F.W.; Vermeulen, R.; Carreon, T.; Caruso, C.C.; Lawson, C.C.; Thayer, K.A.; Twery, M.J.; Ewens, A.D.; Garner, S.C.; Schwingl, P.J.; Boyd, W.A.
Title Health consequences of electric lighting practices in the modern world: A report on the National Toxicology Program's workshop on shift work at night, artificial light at night, and circadian disruption Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication (down) The Science of the Total Environment Abbreviated Journal Sci Total Environ
Volume 607-608 Issue Pages 1073-1084
Keywords Human Health
Abstract The invention of electric light has facilitated a society in which people work, sleep, eat, and play at all hours of the 24-hour day. Although electric light clearly has benefited humankind, exposures to electric light, especially light at night (LAN), may disrupt sleep and biological processes controlled by endogenous circadian clocks, potentially resulting in adverse health outcomes. Many of the studies evaluating adverse health effects have been conducted among night- and rotating-shift workers, because this scenario gives rise to significant exposure to LAN. Because of the complexity of this topic, the National Toxicology Program convened an expert panel at a public workshop entitled “Shift Work at Night, Artificial Light at Night, and Circadian Disruption” to obtain input on conducting literature-based health hazard assessments and to identify data gaps and research needs. The Panel suggested describing light both as a direct effector of endogenous circadian clocks and rhythms and as an enabler of additional activities or behaviors that may lead to circadian disruption, such as night-shift work and atypical and inconsistent sleep-wake patterns that can lead to social jet lag. Future studies should more comprehensively characterize and measure the relevant light-related exposures and link these exposures to both time-independent biomarkers of circadian disruption and biomarkers of adverse health outcomes. This information should lead to improvements in human epidemiological and animal or in vitro models, more rigorous health hazard assessments, and intervention strategies to minimize the occurrence of adverse health outcomes due to these exposures.
Address Office of Health Assessment and Translation, Division of the National Toxicology Program, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), Research Triangle Park, NC, United States. Electronic address: boydw@niehs.nih.gov
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28724246 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1689
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Author Manriquez, P.H.; Jara, M.E.; Diaz, M.I.; Quijon, P.A.; Widdicombe, S.; Pulgar, J.; Manriquez, K.; Quintanilla-Ahumada, D.; Duarte, C.
Title Artificial light pollution influences behavioral and physiological traits in a keystone predator species, Concholepas concholepas Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication (down) The Science of the Total Environment Abbreviated Journal Sci Total Environ
Volume 661 Issue Pages 543-552
Keywords Animals
Abstract Artificial Light At Night (ALAN) is an increasing global problem that, despite being widely recognized in terrestrial systems, has been studied much less in marine habitats. In this study we investigated the effect of ALAN on behavioral and physiological traits of Concholepas concholepas, an important keystone species of the south-eastern Pacific coast. We used juveniles collected in intertidal habitats that had not previously been exposed to ALAN. In the laboratory we exposed them to two treatments: darkness and white LED (Lighting Emitting Diodes) to test for the impacts of ALAN on prey-searching behavior, self-righting time and metabolism. In the field, the distribution of juveniles was observed during daylight-hours to determine whether C. concholepas preferred shaded or illuminated microhabitats. Moreover, we compared the abundance of juveniles collected during day- and night-time hours. The laboratory experiments demonstrated that juveniles of C. concholepas seek out and choose their prey more efficiently in darkened areas. White LED illuminated conditions increased righting times and metabolism. Field surveys indicated that, during daylight hours, juveniles were more abundant in shaded micro-habitats than in illuminated ones. However, during darkness hours, individuals were not seen to aggregate in any particular microhabitats. We conclude that the exposure to ALAN might disrupt important behavioral and physiological traits of small juveniles in this species which, as a mechanism to avoid visual predators, are mainly active at night. It follows that ALAN in coastal areas might modify the entire community structure of intertidal habitats by altering the behavior of this keystone species.
Address Departamento de Ecologia y Biodiversidad, Facultad de Ciencias de la Vida, Universidad Andres Bello, Santiago, Chile
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30682607 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2213
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Author Zhen, J.; Pei, T.; Xie, S.
Title Kriging methods with auxiliary nighttime lights data to detect potentially toxic metals concentrations in soil Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication (down) The Science of the Total Environment Abbreviated Journal Sci Total Environ
Volume 659 Issue Pages 363-371
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract The spatial distribution of potentially toxic metals (PTMs) has been shown to be related to anthropogenic activities. Several auxiliary variables, such as those related to remote sensing data (e.g. digital elevation models, land use, and enhanced vegetation index) and soil properties (e.g. pH, soil type and cation exchange capacity), have been used to predict the spatial distribution of soil PTMs. However, these variables are mostly focused on natural processes or a single aspect of anthropogenic activities and cannot reflect the effects of integrated anthropogenic activities. Nighttime lights (NTL) images, a representative variable of integrated anthropogenic activities, may have the potential to reflect PTMs distribution. To uncover this relationship and determine the effects on evaluation precision, the NTL was employed as an auxiliary variable to map the distribution of PTMs in the United Kingdom. In this study, areas with a digital number (DN)>/=50 and an area>30km(2) were extracted from NTL images to represent regions of high-frequency anthropogenic activities. Subsequently, the distance between the sampling points and the nearest extracted area was calculated. Barium, lead, zinc, copper, and nickel concentrations exhibited the highest correlation with this distance. Their concentrations were mapped using distance as an auxiliary variable through three different kriging methods, i.e., ordinary kriging (OK), cokriging (CK), and regression kriging (RK). The accuracy of the predictions was evaluated using the leave-one-out cross validation method. Regardless of the elements, CK and RK always exhibited lower mean absolute error and root mean square error, in contrast to OK. This indicates that using the NTL as the auxiliary variable indeed enhanced the prediction accuracy for the relevant PTMs. Additionally, RK showed superior results in most cases. Hence, we recommend RK for prediction of PTMs when using the NTL as the auxiliary variable.
Address State Key Laboratory of Geological Processes and Mineral Resources(GPMR), Faculty of Earth Sciences, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan, 430074, China
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30599355 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2494
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Author Xue, X.; Lin, Y.; Zheng, Q.; Wang, K.; Zhang, J.; Deng, J.; Abubakar, G.A.; Gan, M.
Title Mapping the fine-scale spatial pattern of artificial light pollution at night in urban environments from the perspective of bird habitats Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication (down) The Science of the Total Environment Abbreviated Journal Sci Total Environ
Volume 702 Issue Pages 134725
Keywords Remote Sensing; Animals; ALAN pollution; Circuitscape; Land cover; Nighttime light image; Urban ecology
Abstract The increase in artificial light at night (ALAN) is a global concern, while the pattern of ALAN pollution inside urban areas has not yet been fully explored. To fill this gap, we developed a novel method to map fine-scale ALAN pollution patterns in urban bird habitats using high spatial resolution ALAN satellite data. First, an ALAN pollution map was derived from JL1-3B satellite images. Then, the core habitat nodes (CHNs) representing the main habitats for urban birds to inhabit were identified from the land cover map, which was produced using Gaofen2 (GF2) data, and the high probability corridors (HPCs), indicating high connectivity paths, were derived from Circuitscape software. Finally, the ALAN patterns in the CHNs and HPCs were analysed, and the mismatch index was proposed to evaluate the trade-off between human activity ALAN demands and ALAN supply for the protection of urban birds. The results demonstrated that 115 woodland patches covering 4149.0ha were selected as CHNs, and most of the CHNs were large urban parks or scenic spots located in the urban fringe. The 2923 modelled HPCs occupying 1179.2ha were small remaining vegetation patches and vegetated corridors along the major transport arteries. The differences in the ALAN pollution patterns between CHNs and HPCs were mainly determined by the characteristics of the green space patches and the light source types. The polluted regions in the CHNs were clustered in a few regions that suffered from concentrated and intensive ALAN, while most of the CHNs remained unaffected. In contrast, the 727 HPCs were mainly polluted by street lighting was scattered and widely distributed, resulting a more varying influence to birds than that in the CHNs. Relating patterns of the ALAN to bird habitats and connectivity provides meaningful information for comprehensive planning to alleviate the disruptive effects of ALAN pollution.
Address College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310058, Zhejiang, China. Electronic address: ganmuye@zju.edu.cn
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31734607 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2765
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Author Dias, K.S.; Dosso, E.S.; Hall, A.S.; Schuch, A.P.; Tozetti, A.M.
Title Ecological light pollution affects anuran calling season, daily calling period, and sensitivity to light in natural Brazilian wetlands Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication (down) The Science of Nature Abbreviated Journal Sci Nat
Volume 106 Issue 7-8 Pages 46
Keywords Animals
Abstract Ecological light pollution alters an environment's light cycle, potentially affecting photoperiod-controlled behavior. Anurans, for example, generally breed nocturnally, and the influence of light pollution on their natural history may therefore be especially strong. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by measuring male calling behavior of anuran communities in natural wetlands in southern Brazil exposed or not exposed to street lights. We recorded seasonal and diel calling activity and calling response to a light pulse. The peak calling season differed between continuously lit and unlit locations with most species in illuminated wetlands shortening their calling season and calling earlier in the year. In unlit breeding sites, Boana pulchella, Pseudis minuta, and Pseudopaludicola falcipes confined their calling activity to well-defined hours of the night, but in continuously lit areas, these species called more continuously through the night. A 2-minute light pulse inhibited calling, but only in unlit wetlands. After a light pulse, frogs quickly resumed calling-suggesting acclimatization to brief artificial light exposure. Our field experiment presents a convincing example of ecological light pollution showing that artificial light alters the seasonal and diel calling time of some South American wetland anurans. It also documents their acclimatization to brief lighting when being continuously exposed to light.
Address Laboratorio de Ecologia de Vertebrados Terrestres, Universidade do Vale do Rio dos Sinos – UNISINOS, Campus Sao Leopoldo, Rio Grande, Rio Grande do Sul, 93020-190, Brazil
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0028-1042 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31280391 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2560
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