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Author Tuttle, B. T., Anderson, S. J., Sutton, P. C., Elvidge, C. D., & Baugh, K.
Title It Used To Be Dark Here Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication (up) American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal
Volume 3 Issue 11 Pages 287-297
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Nighttime satellite imagery from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS) has a unique capability to observe nocturnal light emissions from sources including cities, wild fires, and gas flares. Data from the DMSP OLS is used in a wide range of studies including mapping urban areas, estimating informal economies, and estimations of population. Given the extensive and increasing list of applications a repeatable method for assessing geolocation accuracy would be beneficial. An array of portable lights was designed and taken to multiple field sites known to have no other light sources. The lights were operated during nighttime overpasses by the DMSP OLS and observed in the imagery. An assessment of the geolocation accuracy was performed by measuring the distance between the GPS measured location of the lights and the observed location in the imagery. A systematic shift was observed and the mean distance was measured at 2.9 km.
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Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2520
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Author Grunsven van, Roy H.A.; Creemers, Raymond; Joosten, Kris; Donners Maurice; Veenendaal, Elmar M.
Title Behaviour of migrating toads under artificial lights differs from other phases of their life cycle Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication (up) Amphibia-Reptilia Abbreviated Journal AMRE
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Keywords animal, amphibia, Anura, fragmentation, light pollution, mitigation, phototaxis, spectra
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Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1568
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Author Schmiedel, J.
Title Auswirkungen künstlicher Beleuchtung auf die Tierwelt – ein Überblick. Schriftenr. Type Journal Article
Year 2001 Publication (up) andschaftspfl. Natursch. Abbreviated Journal
Volume 67 Issue Pages 19-51
Keywords Animals
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Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 693
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Author Pauers, M.J.; Kuchenbecker, J.A.; Neitz, M.; Neitz, J.
Title Changes in the colour of light cue circadian activity Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication (up) Animal Behaviour Abbreviated Journal Anim Behav
Volume 83 Issue 5 Pages 1143-1151
Keywords melanopsin; Circadian Rhythm; physiology of vision; biology
Abstract The discovery of melanopsin, the non-visual opsin present in intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs), has created great excitement in the field of circadian biology. Now, researchers have emphasized melanopsin as the main photopigment governing circadian activity in vertebrates. Circadian biologists have tested this idea under standard laboratory, 12h Light: 12h Dark, lighting conditions that lack the dramatic daily colour changes of natural skylight. Here we used a stimulus paradigm in which the colour of the illumination changed throughout the day, thus mimicking natural skylight, but luminance, sensed intrinsically by melanopsin containing ganglion cells, was kept constant. We show in two species of cichlid, Aequidens pulcher and Labeotropheus fuelleborni, that changes in light colour, not intensity, are the primary determinants of natural circadian activity. Moreover, opponent-cone photoreceptor inputs to ipRGCs mediate the sensation of wavelength change, and not the intrinsic photopigment, melanopsin. These results have implications for understanding the evolutionary biology of non-visual photosensory pathways and answer long-standing questions about the nature and distribution of photopigments in organisms, including providing a solution to the mystery of why nocturnal animals routinely have mutations that interrupt the function of their short wavelength sensitive photopigment gene.
Address Department of Ophthalmology, University of Washington Medical School, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, Washington, 98195, USA
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Notes PMID:22639465; PMCID:PMC3358782 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 30
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Author Buchanan, B.W.
Title Effects of enhanced lighting on the behaviour of nocturnal frogs Type Journal Article
Year 1993 Publication (up) Animal Behaviour Abbreviated Journal Animal Behaviour
Volume 45 Issue 5 Pages 893-899
Keywords animals; amphibians; frogs; grey treefrog; Hyla chrysoscelis; foraging; infrared
Abstract Biologists studying anuran amphibians usually assume that artificial, visible light does not affect the behaviour of nocturnal frogs. This assumption was tested in a laboratory experiment. The foraging behaviour of grey treefrogs, Hyla chrysoscelis, was compared under four lighting conditions: ambient light (equivalent to bright moonlight, 0·003 lx), red-filtered light (4·1 lx), low-intensity 'white' light (3·8 lx), and high-intensity 'white' light (12·0 lx). The treatments were chosen to correspond to standard methods of field observation of frog behaviour. The foraging behaviour of frogs in the four treatments was observed using infra-red light that was invisible to the frogs. The ability of the frogs to detect, and subsequently consume prey was significantly reduced under all of the enhanced light treatments relative to the ambient light treatment. Thus, the use of artificial light, within the visible spectrum of the frogs' eyes, can influence the outcome of nocturnal behavioural observations. These results lead to the recommendation that anuran biologists use infra-red or light amplification devices when changes in frogs' visual capabilities may influence the conclusions drawn from a study.
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Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 72
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