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Author Pauers, M.J.; Kuchenbecker, J.A.; Neitz, M.; Neitz, J.
Title Changes in the colour of light cue circadian activity Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication (up) Animal Behaviour Abbreviated Journal Anim Behav
Volume 83 Issue 5 Pages 1143-1151
Keywords melanopsin; Circadian Rhythm; physiology of vision; biology
Abstract The discovery of melanopsin, the non-visual opsin present in intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs), has created great excitement in the field of circadian biology. Now, researchers have emphasized melanopsin as the main photopigment governing circadian activity in vertebrates. Circadian biologists have tested this idea under standard laboratory, 12h Light: 12h Dark, lighting conditions that lack the dramatic daily colour changes of natural skylight. Here we used a stimulus paradigm in which the colour of the illumination changed throughout the day, thus mimicking natural skylight, but luminance, sensed intrinsically by melanopsin containing ganglion cells, was kept constant. We show in two species of cichlid, Aequidens pulcher and Labeotropheus fuelleborni, that changes in light colour, not intensity, are the primary determinants of natural circadian activity. Moreover, opponent-cone photoreceptor inputs to ipRGCs mediate the sensation of wavelength change, and not the intrinsic photopigment, melanopsin. These results have implications for understanding the evolutionary biology of non-visual photosensory pathways and answer long-standing questions about the nature and distribution of photopigments in organisms, including providing a solution to the mystery of why nocturnal animals routinely have mutations that interrupt the function of their short wavelength sensitive photopigment gene.
Address Department of Ophthalmology, University of Washington Medical School, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, Washington, 98195, USA
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 0003-3472 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:22639465; PMCID:PMC3358782 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 30
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Author Buchanan, B.W.
Title Effects of enhanced lighting on the behaviour of nocturnal frogs Type Journal Article
Year 1993 Publication (up) Animal Behaviour Abbreviated Journal Animal Behaviour
Volume 45 Issue 5 Pages 893-899
Keywords animals; amphibians; frogs; grey treefrog; Hyla chrysoscelis; foraging; infrared
Abstract Biologists studying anuran amphibians usually assume that artificial, visible light does not affect the behaviour of nocturnal frogs. This assumption was tested in a laboratory experiment. The foraging behaviour of grey treefrogs, Hyla chrysoscelis, was compared under four lighting conditions: ambient light (equivalent to bright moonlight, 0·003 lx), red-filtered light (4·1 lx), low-intensity 'white' light (3·8 lx), and high-intensity 'white' light (12·0 lx). The treatments were chosen to correspond to standard methods of field observation of frog behaviour. The foraging behaviour of frogs in the four treatments was observed using infra-red light that was invisible to the frogs. The ability of the frogs to detect, and subsequently consume prey was significantly reduced under all of the enhanced light treatments relative to the ambient light treatment. Thus, the use of artificial light, within the visible spectrum of the frogs' eyes, can influence the outcome of nocturnal behavioural observations. These results lead to the recommendation that anuran biologists use infra-red or light amplification devices when changes in frogs' visual capabilities may influence the conclusions drawn from a study.
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ISSN 0003-3472 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 72
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Author Aschoff, J.
Title Temporal orientation: circadian clocks in animals and humans Type Journal Article
Year 1989 Publication (up) Animal Behaviour Abbreviated Journal Animal Behaviour
Volume 37 Issue Pages 881-896
Keywords Human Health; Animals
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 713
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Author Thompson, E.K.; Cullinan, N.L.; Jones, T.M.; Hopkins, G.R.
Title Effects of artificial light at night and male calling on movement patterns and mate location in field crickets Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication (up) Animal Behaviour Abbreviated Journal Animal Behaviour
Volume 158 Issue Pages 183-191
Keywords Animals
Abstract Anthropogenic factors, such as artificial light at night (ALAN), are increasingly linked to significant modifications in animal behaviours, such as foraging or migration. However, few studies have investigated directly whether the presence of ALAN affects the ability to find a mate (mate location). One direct effect of the presence of ALAN is that it can create a light barrier in an otherwise dark environment. This may have significant behavioural implications for nocturnally active species if it affects their ability to respond to potential mates. Our study, using the acoustically orienting Australian black field cricket, Teleogryllus commodus, determined experimentally whether the presence of a fragmented light environment influenced movement patterns of virgin females and males. Moreover, given the importance of male song for reproductive outcomes in this species, we assessed simultaneously whether such behaviours were modified by the presence of a male attraction call. We found that while initiation of movement was slower in the presence of ALAN, the behavioural shifts associated with its presence were relatively small compared to the influence of a broadcast male attraction call. The response to the male attraction call was typically stronger for females than for males, but both males and females modified aspects of behaviour when it was present regardless of whether their immediate environment was fragmented by artificial light at night or not. Artificial light at night may alter subtle aspects of movement and mating behaviour in this species, but ultimately does not provide a barrier to movement or mate location.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2752
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Author Smolka, J.; Baird, E.; el Jundi, B.; Reber, T.; Byrne, M.J.; Dacke, M.
Title Night sky orientation with diurnal and nocturnal eyes: dim-light adaptations are critical when the moon is out of sight Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication (up) Animal Behaviour Abbreviated Journal Animal Behaviour
Volume 111 Issue Pages 127-146
Keywords Animals; dung beetle; insect; Milky Way; nocturnal adaptation; polarized moonlight; sky compass; straight-line orientation; vision; Scarabaeus; Scarabaeus lamarcki; Scarabaeus satyrus
Abstract The visual systems of many animals feature energetically costly specializations to enable them to function in dim light. It is often unclear, however, how large the behavioural benefit of these specializations is, because a direct comparison in a behaviourally relevant task between closely related day- and night-active species is not usually possible. Here we compared the orientation performance of diurnal and nocturnal species of dung beetles, Scarabaeus (Kheper) lamarcki and Scarabaeus satyrus, respectively, attempting to roll dung balls along straight paths both during the day and at night. Using video tracking, we quantified the straightness of paths and the repeatability of roll bearings as beetles exited a flat arena in their natural habitat or under controlled conditions indoors. Both species oriented equally well when either the moon or an artificial point light source was available, but when the view of the moon was blocked and only wide-field cues such as the lunar polarization pattern or the stars were available for orientation, nocturnal beetles were oriented substantially better. We found no evidence that ball-rolling speed changed with light level, which suggests little or no temporal summation in the visual system. Finally, we found that both diurnal and nocturnal beetles tended to choose bearings that led them towards a bright light source, but away from a dim one. Our results show that even diurnal insects, at least those with superposition eyes, could orient by the light of the moon, but that dim-light adaptations are needed for precise orientation when the moon is not visible.
Address Department of Biology, Lund University, Biology Building, Sölvegatan 35, 223 62 Lund, Sweden; jochen.smolka(at)biol.lu.se
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Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
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ISSN 0003-3472 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1317
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