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Author Aschoff, J.
Title Temporal orientation: circadian clocks in animals and humans Type Journal Article
Year 1989 Publication (up) Animal Behaviour Abbreviated Journal Animal Behaviour
Volume 37 Issue Pages 881-896
Keywords Human Health; Animals
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ISSN 0003-3472 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 713
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Author Thompson, E.K.; Cullinan, N.L.; Jones, T.M.; Hopkins, G.R.
Title Effects of artificial light at night and male calling on movement patterns and mate location in field crickets Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication (up) Animal Behaviour Abbreviated Journal Animal Behaviour
Volume 158 Issue Pages 183-191
Keywords Animals
Abstract Anthropogenic factors, such as artificial light at night (ALAN), are increasingly linked to significant modifications in animal behaviours, such as foraging or migration. However, few studies have investigated directly whether the presence of ALAN affects the ability to find a mate (mate location). One direct effect of the presence of ALAN is that it can create a light barrier in an otherwise dark environment. This may have significant behavioural implications for nocturnally active species if it affects their ability to respond to potential mates. Our study, using the acoustically orienting Australian black field cricket, Teleogryllus commodus, determined experimentally whether the presence of a fragmented light environment influenced movement patterns of virgin females and males. Moreover, given the importance of male song for reproductive outcomes in this species, we assessed simultaneously whether such behaviours were modified by the presence of a male attraction call. We found that while initiation of movement was slower in the presence of ALAN, the behavioural shifts associated with its presence were relatively small compared to the influence of a broadcast male attraction call. The response to the male attraction call was typically stronger for females than for males, but both males and females modified aspects of behaviour when it was present regardless of whether their immediate environment was fragmented by artificial light at night or not. Artificial light at night may alter subtle aspects of movement and mating behaviour in this species, but ultimately does not provide a barrier to movement or mate location.
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ISSN 0003-3472 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2752
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Author Smolka, J.; Baird, E.; el Jundi, B.; Reber, T.; Byrne, M.J.; Dacke, M.
Title Night sky orientation with diurnal and nocturnal eyes: dim-light adaptations are critical when the moon is out of sight Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication (up) Animal Behaviour Abbreviated Journal Animal Behaviour
Volume 111 Issue Pages 127-146
Keywords Animals; dung beetle; insect; Milky Way; nocturnal adaptation; polarized moonlight; sky compass; straight-line orientation; vision; Scarabaeus; Scarabaeus lamarcki; Scarabaeus satyrus
Abstract The visual systems of many animals feature energetically costly specializations to enable them to function in dim light. It is often unclear, however, how large the behavioural benefit of these specializations is, because a direct comparison in a behaviourally relevant task between closely related day- and night-active species is not usually possible. Here we compared the orientation performance of diurnal and nocturnal species of dung beetles, Scarabaeus (Kheper) lamarcki and Scarabaeus satyrus, respectively, attempting to roll dung balls along straight paths both during the day and at night. Using video tracking, we quantified the straightness of paths and the repeatability of roll bearings as beetles exited a flat arena in their natural habitat or under controlled conditions indoors. Both species oriented equally well when either the moon or an artificial point light source was available, but when the view of the moon was blocked and only wide-field cues such as the lunar polarization pattern or the stars were available for orientation, nocturnal beetles were oriented substantially better. We found no evidence that ball-rolling speed changed with light level, which suggests little or no temporal summation in the visual system. Finally, we found that both diurnal and nocturnal beetles tended to choose bearings that led them towards a bright light source, but away from a dim one. Our results show that even diurnal insects, at least those with superposition eyes, could orient by the light of the moon, but that dim-light adaptations are needed for precise orientation when the moon is not visible.
Address Department of Biology, Lund University, Biology Building, Sölvegatan 35, 223 62 Lund, Sweden; jochen.smolka(at)biol.lu.se
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Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
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ISSN 0003-3472 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1317
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Author Da Silva, A.; Valcu, M.; Kempenaers, B.
Title Behavioural plasticity in the onset of dawn song under intermittent experimental night lighting Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication (up) Animal Behaviour Abbreviated Journal Animal Behaviour
Volume 117 Issue Pages 155-165
Keywords Animals
Abstract The disruption of daily rhythms is one of the most studied ecological consequences of light pollution. Previous work showed that several songbird species initiated dawn song earlier in areas with light pollution. However, the mechanisms underlying this shift are still unknown. Individuals may immediately adjust their timing of singing to the presence of artificial light (behavioural plasticity), but the observed effect may also be due to phenotype-dependent habitat choice, effects of conditions during early life or micro-evolution. The main aim of this study was to experimentally investigate how males of four common passerine species respond to day-to-day variation in the presence of artificial night lighting in terms of the timing of singing. During two consecutive breeding seasons, we manipulated the presence of light throughout the night in a cyclic fashion in several naturally undisturbed forest patches. We show that individuals of all four species immediately and reversibly adjusted their onset of dawn singing in response to artificial light. The effect was strongest in the European robin, but relatively small in the blue tit, the great tit and the blackbird. The effect in the latter two species was smaller than expected from the correlational studies. This may be coincidence (small sample size of this study), but it could also indicate that there are longer-term effects of living in light-polluted urban areas on timing of dawn singing, or that birds use compensatory behaviours such as light avoidance. We found no evidence that our light treatment had carryover effects into the subsequent dark period, but robins progressively advanced their dawn singing during the light treatment.
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ISSN 0003-3472 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1467
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Author Botha, L.M.; Jones, T.M.; Hopkins, G.R.
Title Effects of lifetime exposure to artificial light at night on cricket ( Teleogryllus commodus ) courtship and mating behaviour Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication (up) Animal Behaviour Abbreviated Journal Animal Behaviour
Volume 129 Issue Pages 181-188
Keywords Animals
Abstract Increasing evidence suggests that key fitness-related behaviours of animals related to courtship and mating may be disrupted by anthropogenic stressors, including artificial light at night (i.e. light produced from anthropogenic sources). Despite its ubiquity in urban habitats, we currently know very little about how artificial night lighting affects the reproductive behaviours of most animals. Our study examined the effects of chronic (lifetime) exposure to one of four ecologically relevant intensities of artificial light at night (0, 1, 10 or 100 lx at night) on courtship and mating behaviours and acoustic sexual signalling in a common nocturnal and crepuscular insect, the Australian black field cricket, Teleogryllus commodus. We found that lifetime exposure to brighter (10–100 lx) artificial light at night affected some aspects of courtship and mating behaviour: it influenced mate choice and mating efficiency in a sex-specific manner, but did not affect the multivariate structure of male courtship calls. Our results suggest that chronic exposure to bright light at night may affect some aspects of mate choice and reproductive behaviour in this common insect, and warrants further study across taxa.
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ISSN 0003-3472 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1671
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