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Author Lahti, T.; Merikanto, I.; Partonen, T.
Title Circadian clock disruptions and the risk of cancer Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication (up) Annals of Medicine Abbreviated Journal Ann Med
Volume 44 Issue 8 Pages 847-853
Keywords Human Health; Cell Division; Chronobiology Disorders/*complications/genetics/*physiopathology; Circadian Clocks/*genetics; Humans; Neoplasms/*etiology; Work Schedule Tolerance/physiology
Abstract Disrupted circadian rhythms may lead to failures in the control of the cell division cycle and the subsequent malignant cell growth. In order to understand the pathogenesis of cancer more in detail, it is crucial to identify those mechanisms of action which contribute to the loss of control of the cell division cycle. This mini-review focuses on the recent findings concerning the links between the human circadian clock and cancer. Clinical implications concern not only feasible methods for the assessment of the circadian time of an individual or for the determination of the best time for administration of a drug of treatment, but also in the future genetic tests for screening and for planning treatment.
Address Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0785-3890 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23072403 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 513
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Author Reiter, R.J.; Tan, D.-X.; Korkmaz, A.; Ma, S.
Title Obesity and metabolic syndrome: association with chronodisruption, sleep deprivation, and melatonin suppression Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication (up) Annals of Medicine Abbreviated Journal Ann Med
Volume 44 Issue 6 Pages 564-577
Keywords Human Health; Adolescent; Adult; Animals; Child; Chronobiology Disorders/*epidemiology; Comorbidity; Disease Models, Animal; Humans; Light/adverse effects; Melatonin/*deficiency/physiology; Metabolic Syndrome X/*epidemiology; Mice; Obesity/*epidemiology; Rats; Sleep Deprivation/*epidemiology
Abstract Obesity has become an epidemic in industrialized and developing countries. In 30 years, unless serious changes are made, a majority of adults and many children will be classified as overweight or obese. Whereas fatness alone endangers physiological performance of even simple tasks, the associated co-morbidity of obesity including metabolic syndrome in all its manifestations is a far more critical problem. If the current trend continues as predicted, health care systems may be incapable of handling the myriad of obesity-related diseases. The financial costs, including those due to medical procedures, absenteeism from work, and reduced economic productivity, will jeopardize the financial well-being of industries. The current review summarizes the potential contributions of three processes that may be contributing to humans becoming progressively more overweight: circadian or chronodisruption, sleep deficiency, and melatonin suppression. Based on the information provided in this survey, life-style factors (independent of the availability of abundant calorie-rich foods) may aggravate weight gain. Both epidemiological and experimental data support associations between disrupted physiological rhythms, a reduction in adequate sleep, and light-at-night-induced suppression of an essential endogenously produced molecule, melatonin. The implication is that if these problems were corrected with life-style changes, body-weight could possibly be more easily controlled.
Address Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, UT Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas, USA. reiter@uthscsa.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0785-3890 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:21668294 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 523
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Author Curtis, A.M.; FitzGerald, G.A.
Title Central and peripheral clocks in cardiovascular and metabolic function Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication (up) Annals of Medicine Abbreviated Journal Ann Med
Volume 38 Issue 8 Pages 552-559
Keywords Human Health
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0785-3890 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 730
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Author Gandy, M.
Title Negative Luminescence Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication (up) Annals of the American Association of Geographers Abbreviated Journal Ann. Amer. Assn. Geographers
Volume Issue Pages 1-18
Keywords Society; geography; urbanism; history
Abstract The increasingly pervasive phenomenon of light pollution spans several different fields of concern, including the loss of the night sky, energy wastage, and the effects of artificial light on circadian rhythms and nocturnal ecology. Although the scale of the problem has grown significantly in recent decades, the underlying dynamics remain only partially understood beyond the identification of specific technological pathways such as the rise of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) or the capitalist transformation of the nocturnal realm. It is suggested that current approaches to the study of light, including the identification of “urban atmospheres,” the elaboration of existing approaches to urban ecology, or the extension of “smart city” type discourses, do not capture the full complexity of the politics of light under late modernity.
Address Department of Geography, University of Cambridge, Downing Place, Cambridge CB2 3EN, UK; mg107(at)cam.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Taylor & Francis Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2469-4452 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1665
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Author Lapostolle, D, & Challéat, S.
Title Making Darkness a Place-Based Resource: How the Fight against Light Pollution Reconfigures Rural Areas in France Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication (up) Annals of the American Association of Geographers Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Conservation; Society
Abstract Light pollution refers to the degradation of darkness through the use of artificial light at night in and around human infrastructures. This pollution is intrinsically related to urbanization and spills out from urban areas to affect both rural and protected areas. Several countries are organizing the fight against light pollution. There, local communities are experimenting with environmental policies designed to protect darkness. The challenge is about preserving biodiversity and fostering the energy transition. In France, a number of pioneering rural areas are experimenting with mechanisms that include this dual implication. Two of them provide the case study for this article. We show how these areas turn darkness into a specific resource. We identify three specification processes. The first obeys an anthropocentric utilitarian rationale and is part of the “economicization” of the environment in the line of shallow ecology. The second follows a rationale of ecocentric conservation and is part of the radical ecologization of the economy, in line with deep ecology. The third is in keeping with an integrated socioecosystemic rationale enshrining the interdependence between development, planning, the preservation of biodiversity, and energy savings. Local areas are plagued with specification controversies. These areas become incubation rooms; that is, spaces for resolving these controversies. These are reflected in a transition operator enabling the local area to take a fresh trajectory in terms of development and planning.
Address
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2949
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