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Author Blair, A. url  isbn
openurl 
  Title Sark in the Dark: Wellbeing and Community on the Dark Sky Island of Sark Type Book Whole
  Year 2016 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Society; ecopsychology; environmental psychology; psychology  
  Abstract Studies of the beneficial and transformative qualities of encounters with nature typically focus on ‘green’ or grounded nature. In 'Sark in the Dark', Ada Blair shifts this focus upwards to a refreshing encounter with the richness of the dark night sky. In this book, she documents the research she conducted while at the University of Wales Trinity Saint David into the culture and history of the world’s first designated Dark Sky Island. Through a series of interviews with Sark residents, as well as poignant self-reflections, Blair explores the importance of the dark sky on human wellbeing and community.  
  Address caladach(at)gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Sophia Centre Press Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Sophia Centre Master Monographs Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 978-1-907767-42-5 Medium Print  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1780  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Rice Kinder Institute for Urban Research url  openurl
  Title What Happens in the Shadows: Streetlights and How They Relate To Crime Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Crime; Lighting  
  Abstract After finding in a previous report, “Streetlights in the City: Understanding the Distribution of Houston Streetlights,” that the city of Houston’s more than 173,000 streetlights were not evenly distributed throughout the city, this next report answers the question: do places with more streetlights have lower crime rates?

The findings complicate the common perception that more streetlights lead to fewer crimes. While there was some evidence that a particularly high density of streetlights can provide protective benefits, excluding those extremes provides a much muddier picture, suggesting that crime is a reflection of other neighborhood contexts. As such, cities should be cautious in expecting direct reductions in crime with the introduction of more streetlights.
 
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1804  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Martinez, L. R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title How Much Should We Trust the Dictator's GDP Estimates? Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal SSRN  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Economics; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract I study the manipulation of GDP statistics in weak and non-democracies. I show that the elasticity of official GDP figures to nighttime lights is systematically larger in more authoritarian regimes. This autocracy gradient in the night-lights elasticity of GDP cannot be explained by differences in a wide range of factors that may affect the mapping of night lights to GDP, such as economic structure, statistical capacity, rates of urbanization or electrification. The gradient is larger when there is a stronger incentive to exaggerate economic performance (years of low growth, before elections or after becoming ineligible for foreign aid) and is only present for GDP sub-components that rely on government information and have low third-party verification. The results indicate that yearly GDP growth rates are inflated by a factor of between 1.15 and 1.3 in the most authoritarian regimes. Correcting for manipulation substantially changes our understanding of comparative economic performance at the turn of the XXI century.  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1926  
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Author Shirkey, R. C. url  openurl
  Title A Model for Nighttime Urban Illumination Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Skyglow  
  Abstract The Army increasingly relies on night operations to accomplish its objectives. These night operations frequently require using Night Vision Goggles and other light-sensitive devices which are strongly affected by ambient lighting, a large component of which is urban. An urban illumination model is proposed for use in tactical decision aids and wargames which would allow for more accurate prediction of target acquisition ranges and increased realism in simulations. This model will build on previous research that predicts broadband brightness as a function of population and distance from the city center. Since city population and aerosols affect light distributions, the model is being extended and generalized for multiple city types and natural and man-made aerosols. An overview of the model along with future improvements will be presented.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author ARMY RESEARCH LAB WHITE SANDS MISSILE RANGE NM COMPUTATIONAL AND INFORMATION SCIENCE DIRECTORATE Thesis  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
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  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes ADA497505 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1977  
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Author Kinzey, B.R.; Perrin, T.E.; Miller, N.J.; Kocifaj, M.; Aubé, M.; Lamphar, H.A. openurl 
  Title An investigation of LED street lighting's impact on sky glow Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume PNNL-26411 Issue Pages  
  Keywords Skyglow; Lighting  
  Abstract A significant amount of public attention has recently focused on perceived impacts of converting street lighting from incumbent lamp-based products to LED technology. Much of this attention pertains to the higher content of short wavelength light (commonly referred to as “blue light”) of LEDs and its attendant influences on sky glow (a brightening of the night sky that can interfere with astronomical observation and may be associated with a host of other issues). The complexity of this topic leads to common misunderstandings and misperceptions among the public, and for this reason the U.S. Department of Energy Solid-State Lighting Program embarked on a study of sky glow using a well-established astronomical model to investigate some of the primary factors influencing sky glow. This report details the results of the investigation and attempts to present those results in terms accessible to the general lighting community. The report also strives to put the results into a larger context, and help educate interested readers on various topics relevant to the issues being discussed.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States) Thesis  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2014  
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