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Author Shih, K.-T.; Liu, J.-S.; Shyu, F.; Yeh, S.-L.; Chen, H.H.
Title Blocking harmful blue light while preserving image color appearance Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication (up) ACM Transactions on Graphics Abbreviated Journal Tog
Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 1-10
Keywords Lighting; Vision
Abstract Recent study in vision science has shown that blue light in a certain frequency band affects human circadian rhythm and impairs our health. Although applying a light blocker to an image display can block the harmful blue light, it inevitably makes an image look like an aged photo. In this paper, we show that it is possible to reduce harmful blue light while preserving the blue appearance of an image. Moreover, we optimize the spectral transmittance profile of blue light blocker based on psychophysical data and develop a color compensation algorithm to minimize color distortion. A prototype using notch filters is built as a proof of concept.
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ISSN 0730-0301 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1640
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Author Brainard, G.C.; Coyle, W.; Ayers, M.; Kemp, J.; Warfield, B.; Maida, J.; Bowen, C.; Bernecker, C.; Lockley, S.W.; Hanifin, J.P.
Title Solid-state lighting for the International Space Station: Tests of visual performance and melatonin regulation Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication (up) Acta Astronautica Abbreviated Journal Acta Astronautica
Volume 92 Issue 1 Pages 21-28
Keywords Human Health; Lighting
Abstract The International Space Station (ISS) uses General Luminaire Assemblies (GLAs) that house fluorescent lamps for illuminating the astronauts' working and living environments. Solid-state light emitting diodes (LEDs) are attractive candidates for replacing the GLAs on the ISS. The advantages of LEDs over conventional fluorescent light sources include lower up-mass, power consumption and heat generation, as well as fewer toxic materials, greater resistance to damage and long lamp life. A prototype Solid-State Lighting Assembly (SSLA) was developed and successfully installed on the ISS. The broad aim of the ongoing work is to test light emitted by prototype SSLAs for supporting astronaut vision and assessing neuroendocrine, circadian, neurobehavioral and sleep effects. Three completed ground-based studies are presented here including experiments on visual performance, color discrimination, and acute plasma melatonin suppression in cohorts of healthy, human subjects under different SSLA light exposure conditions within a high-fidelity replica of the ISS Crew Quarters (CQ). All visual tests were done under indirect daylight at 201 lx, fluorescent room light at 531 lx and 4870 K SSLA light in the CQ at 1266 lx. Visual performance was assessed with numerical verification tests (NVT). NVT data show that there are no significant differences in score (F=0.73, p=0.48) or time (F=0.14, p=0.87) for subjects performing five contrast tests (10%–100%). Color discrimination was assessed with Farnsworth-Munsell 100 Hue tests (FM-100). The FM-100 data showed no significant differences (F=0.01, p=0.99) in color discrimination for indirect daylight, fluorescent room light and 4870 K SSLA light in the CQ. Plasma melatonin suppression data show that there are significant differences (F=29.61, p<0.0001) across the percent change scores of plasma melatonin for five corneal irradiances, ranging from 0 to 405 &#956;W/cm2 of 4870 K SSLA light in the CQ (0–1270 lx). Risk factors for the health and safety of astronauts include disturbed circadian rhythms and altered sleep–wake patterns. These studies will help determine if SSLA lighting can be used both to support astronaut vision and serve as an in-flight countermeasure for circadian desynchrony, sleep disruption and cognitive performance deficits on the ISS.
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ISSN 0094-5765 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1533
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Author Boldogh, S.; Dobrosi, D.; Samu, P.
Title The effects of the illumination of buildings on house-dwelling bats and its conservation consequences Type Journal Article
Year 2007 Publication (up) Acta Chiropterologica Abbreviated Journal Acta Chiropterologica
Volume 9 Issue 2 Pages 527-534
Keywords Animals
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ISSN 1508-1109 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 1003
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Author Petrželková, K. J.; Downs, N. C.; Zukal, J.; Racey, P. A.
Title A comparison between emergence and return activity in pipistrelle bats Pipistrellus pipistrellus and P. pygmaeus Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication (up) Acta Chiropterologica Abbreviated Journal
Volume 8 Issue 2 Pages 381-390
Keywords animals; fying mammals: animal behaviour
Abstract Bats may be vulnerable to predation during evening emergence and morning return to their roosts. Early emergence increases the risk of exposure to raptorial birds, but emerging late confers a risk of missing the dusk peak of aerial insects. Here, both emergence and return activity was studied in detail at the same roosts for the first time. We investigated six maternity colonies of pipistrelle bats (Pipistrellus pipistrellus and P. pygmaeus) in NE Scotland and recorded light levels and time of emergence and return of the bats with respect to sunset and sunrise on the same nights. Parameters of return activity generally occurred at lower light intensities than those of emergence. Therefore, the interval between dawn return and sunrise was generally longer than that between sunset and dusk emergence. Emergence and return were equal in duration. Bats clustered more on emergence in comparison with return during pregnancy and lactation, whereas during postlactation this trend was reversed.
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Language English Summary Language English Original Title
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Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1598
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Author Chen, B.; Shi, G.; Wang, B.; Zhao, J.; Tan, S.
Title Estimation of the anthropogenic heat release distribution in China from 1992 to 2009 Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication (up) Acta Meteorologica Sinica Abbreviated Journal Acta Meteorol Sin
Volume 26 Issue 4 Pages 507-515
Keywords DMSP/OLS; estimation; distribution; anthropogenic heat flux; China; remote sensing
Abstract Stable light data from Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP)/Operational Linescan System (OLS) satellites and authoritative energy consumption data distributed by National Bureau of Statistics of China were applied to estimating the distribution of anthropogenic heat release in China from 1992 to 2009. A strong linear relationship was found between DMSP/OLS digital number data and anthropogenic heat flux density (AHFD). The results indicate that anthropogenic heat release in China was geographically concentrated and was fundamentally correlated with economic activities. The anthropogenic heat release in economically developed areas in northern, eastern, and southern China was much larger than other regions, whereas it was very small in northwestern and southwestern China. The mean AHFD in China increased from 0.07 W m&#8722;2 in 1978 to 0.28 W m&#8722;2 in 2008. The results indicate that in the anthropogenic heat-concentrated regions of Beijing, the Yangtze River Delta, and the Pearl River Delta, the AHFD levels were much higher than the average. The effect of aggravating anthropogenic heat release on climate change deserves further investigation.
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ISSN 0894-0525 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 215
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