|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Vinogradova, I.A.; Anisimov, V.N.; Bukalev, A.V.; Semenchenko, A.V.; Zabezhinski, M.A.
Title Circadian disruption induced by light-at-night accelerates aging and promotes tumorigenesis in rats Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication (up) AGING Abbreviated Journal
Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 855-865
Keywords Animals; light-at-night; life span; tumorigenesis; rats
Abstract We evaluated the effect of various light/dark regimens on the survival, life span and tumorigenesis in rats. Two hundred eight male and 203 females LIO rats were subdivided into 4 groups and kept at various light/dark regimens: standard 12:12 light/dark (LD); natural lighting of the North-West of Russia (NL); constant light (LL), and constant darkness (DD) since the age of 25 days until natural death. We found that exposure to NL and LL regimens accelerated development of metabolic syndrome and spontaneous tumorigenesis, shortened life span both in male and females rats as compared to the standard LD regimen. We conclude that circadian disruption induced by light-at-night accelerates aging and promotes tumorigenesis in rats. This observation supports the conclusion of the International Agency Research on Cancer that shift-work that involves circadian disruption is probably carcinogenic to humans.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 403
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kolkert, H.; Smith, R.; Rader, R.; Reid, N.
Title Insectivorous bats foraging in cotton crop interiors is driven by moon illumination and insect abundance, but diversity benefits from woody vegetation cover Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication (up) Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment Abbreviated Journal Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment
Volume 302 Issue Pages 107068
Keywords Animals; Moonlight
Abstract Landscape and biophysical determinants of insectivorous bat activity and community composition in space and time are central to understanding how growers can maximise bat-mediated pest control services in crops. We measured community composition, abundance, richness and foraging attempts of insectivorous bats in the centre of dryland cotton crops using acoustic sampling. We examined how bat activity was related to woody vegetation in the surrounding landscape, prey insect abundance, distance to crop edge, size of field, proximity to waterbodies and moon illumination to better understand insectivorous bat diversity and foraging in crop interiors. We collected a total of 9467 acoustic files including 1198 foraging attempts (feeding buzzes) of at least 21 insectivorous bat species. The bat assemblage in cotton crop interiors (richness and diversity) was positively related to woody vegetation foliage cover within 5–10 km of the crop, as well as Lepidoptera and Hymenoptera abundance, but was negatively related to distance from the field edge into the crop and moon illumination. Increased feeding attempts were linked to increased Lepidoptera and Hemiptera on nights of high moon illumination (> 75 %). Bat activity and foraging was also higher during nights of increased insect abundance, particularly Lepidoptera, indicating that bats track food resources. Our results highlight the importance of managing bat roosting habitat at different landscape scales to enhance bat diversity and foraging in crop interiors and thus insect consumption. Given the high bat feeding activity on nights of high moon illumination and increased Hemiptera abundance, the timing of insecticide sprays to target pests, such as Hemipteran sucking bugs, could be scheduled on nights of low moon illumination. Such information is useful in identifying conservation priorities for the management of bats in intensively farmed agroecosystems and should facilitate habitat management by growers to maximise crop pest protection services in crop interiors.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0167-8809 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3045
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Mayoral, O.; Solbes, J.; Cantó, J.; Pina, T.
Title What Has Been Thought and Taught on the Lunar Influence on Plants in Agriculture? Perspective from Physics and Biology Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication (up) Agronomy Abbreviated Journal Agronomy
Volume 10 Issue 7 Pages 955
Keywords Moonlight; Plants
Abstract This paper reviews the beliefs which drive some agricultural sectors to consider the lunar influence as either a stress or a beneficial factor when it comes to organizing their tasks. To address the link between lunar phases and agriculture from a scientific perspective, we conducted a review of textbooks and monographs used to teach agronomy, botany, horticulture and plant physiology; we also consider the physics that address the effects of the Moon on our planet. Finally, we review the scientific literature on plant development, specifically searching for any direct or indirect reference to the influence of the Moon on plant physiology. We found that there is no reliable, science-based evidence for any relationship between lunar phases and plant physiology in any plant–science related textbooks or peer-reviewed journal articles justifying agricultural practices conditioned by the Moon. Nor does evidence from the field of physics support a causal relationship between lunar forces and plant responses. Therefore, popular agricultural practices that are tied to lunar phases have no scientific backing. We strongly encourage teachers involved in plant sciences education to objectively address pseudo-scientific ideas and promote critical thinking.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2073-4395 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3036
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Briggs, R. C.
Title Why does aid not target the poorest? Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication (up) AIDDATA Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Foreign aid projects typically have local effects, so if they are to reduce poverty then they need to be placed close to the poor. I show that, conditional on local population, World Bank (WB) project aid targets richer parts of countries. This relationship holds over time and across world regions. I test five explanations for pro-rich targeting using a pre-registered conjoint experiment on WB task team leaders (TTLs). TTLs perceive aid-receiving governments as most interested in targeting aid politically and controlling implementation. They also believe that aid works better in poorer or more remote areas, but that implementation in these areas is uniquely difficult. These results speak to debates in distributive politics, international bargaining over aid, and principal-agent issues in international organizations. The results also suggest that tweaks to WB incentive structures to make ease of project implementation less important may encourage aid to flow to poorer parts of countries.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2719
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kyba, C.C.M.; Ruhtz, T.; Lindemann, C.; Fischer, J.; Hölker, F.
Title Two camera system for measurement of urban uplight angular distribution Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication (up) AIP Conf. Proc Abbreviated Journal
Volume 1531 Issue 568 Pages
Keywords Instrumentiation
Abstract The angular distribution function of light emitted from cities is unknown, and represents the most important systematic error in skyglow simulations. We describe a method for measuring this distribution using a two camera system mounted on an aerial platform. We present preliminary results from a test flight using such a system, taken over the city of Berlin on July 14, 2011.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 467
Permanent link to this record