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Author Otchia, C. S. & Asongu, S. A. url  openurl
  Title Industrial Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa: Evidence from Machine Learning with Insights from Nightlight Satellite Images Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication (up) African Governance and Development Institute Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract This study uses nightlight time data and machine learning techniques to predict industrial development in Africa. The results provide the first evidence on how machine learning techniques and nightlight data can be used to predict economic development in places where subnational data are missing or not precise. Taken together, the research confirms four groups of important determinants of industrial growth: natural resources, agriculture growth, institutions, and manufacturing imports. Our findings indicate that Africa should follow a more

multisector approach for development, putting natural resources and agriculture productivity growth at the forefront.
 
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2627  
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Author Glass, J.; Ryan, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Reduced seabird night strikes and mortality in the Tristan rock lobster fishery Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication (up) African Journal of Marine Science Abbreviated Journal African Journal of Marine Science  
  Volume 35 Issue 4 Pages 589-592  
  Keywords storm petrels; Pelagodroma marina; Fregetta grallaria; Fregetta tropica; common diving petrel; Pelecanoides urinatrix; broad-billed prion; Pachyptila vittata; Tristan rock lobster; Jasus tristani; seabirds; birds; collision; Gough Island; Tristan  
  Abstract The main impact of the fishery for Tristan rock lobster Jasus tristani on seabirds at the Tristan archipelago and Gough Island is through night strikes, when petrels collide with a ship after being disorientated by its lights. Tristan fishery observers have kept records of night strikes on the MV Edinburgh since the 2010/2011 fishing season. Over the last three years, 723 seabirds from nine species were recorded coming aboard the fishing vessel, with at least 39 (5.4%) birds dying as a result. Birds killed were broad-billed prions Pachyptila vittata (41%), common diving petrels Pelecanoides urinatrix (23%), and storm petrels (Pelagodroma marina and Fregetta grallaria/tropica 36%). All these species are listed as Least Concern globally, and the numbers killed per year are <0.1% of the island populations. The captain and crew of the Edinburgh are aware of the problem posed by deck lights at night, and attempt to keep external lighting to a minimum. As a result, the numbers of birds coming aboard vessels in this fishery have decreased from an average of 130 birds per night in 1989 to less than two birds per night in 2010–2013. Currently, most incidents occur during exceptional events when circumstances require deck lights to be lit at night. Consideration should be given to banning fishing operations at night, at least on misty nights.  
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  ISSN 1814-232X ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 53  
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Author Shen, J.; Tower, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of light on aging and longevity Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication (up) Ageing Research Reviews Abbreviated Journal Ageing Res Rev  
  Volume 53 Issue Pages 100913  
  Keywords Human Health; Review; Aging; longevity  
  Abstract Increasing evidence suggests an important role for light in regulation of aging and longevity. UV radiation is a mutagen that can promote aging and decrease longevity. In contrast, NIR light has shown protective effects in animal disease models. In invertebrates, visible light can shorten or extend lifespan, depending on the intensity and wavelength composition. Visible light also impacts human health, including retina function, sleep, cancer and psychiatric disorders. Possible mechanisms of visible light include: controlling circadian rhythms, inducing oxidative stress, and acting through the retina to affect neuronal circuits and systems. Changes in artificial lighting (e.g., LEDs) may have implications for human health. It will be important to further explore the mechanisms of how light affects aging and longevity, and how light affects human health.  
  Address Molecular and Computational Biology Program, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Southern California, Los Angeles CA 90089-2910, United States  
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  ISSN 1568-1637 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:31154014 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2514  
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Author Vinogradova, I.A.; Anisimov, V.N.; Bukalev, A.V.; Ilyukha, V.A.; Khizhkin, E.A.; Lotosh, T.A.; Semenchenko, A.V.; Zabezhinski, M.A. url  openurl
  Title Circadian disruption induced by light-at-night accelerates aging and promotes tumorigenesis in young but not in old rats Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication (up) AGING Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 2 Issue 2 Pages 82-92  
  Keywords Animals; Light-at-night; life span; tumorigenesis; rats  
  Abstract We evaluated the effect of exposure to constant light started at the age of 1 month and at the age of 14 months on the survival, life span, tumorigenesis and age-related dynamics of antioxidant enzymes activity in various organs in comparison to the rats maintained at the standard (12:12 light/dark) light/dark regimen. We found that exposure to constant light started at the age of 1 month accelerated spontaneous tumorigenesis and shortened life span both in male and female rats as compared to the standard regimen. At the same time, the exposure to constant light started at the age of 14 months failed to influence survival of male and female rats. While delaying tumors in males, constant light accelerated tumors in females. We conclude that circadian disruption induced by light-at-night started at the age of 1 month accelerates aging and promotes tumorigenesis in rats, however failed affect survival when started at the age of 14 months.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 401  
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Author Vinogradova, I.A.; Anisimov, V.N.; Bukalev, A.V.; Semenchenko, A.V.; Zabezhinski, M.A. url  openurl
  Title Circadian disruption induced by light-at-night accelerates aging and promotes tumorigenesis in rats Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication (up) AGING Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 855-865  
  Keywords Animals; light-at-night; life span; tumorigenesis; rats  
  Abstract We evaluated the effect of various light/dark regimens on the survival, life span and tumorigenesis in rats. Two hundred eight male and 203 females LIO rats were subdivided into 4 groups and kept at various light/dark regimens: standard 12:12 light/dark (LD); natural lighting of the North-West of Russia (NL); constant light (LL), and constant darkness (DD) since the age of 25 days until natural death. We found that exposure to NL and LL regimens accelerated development of metabolic syndrome and spontaneous tumorigenesis, shortened life span both in male and females rats as compared to the standard LD regimen. We conclude that circadian disruption induced by light-at-night accelerates aging and promotes tumorigenesis in rats. This observation supports the conclusion of the International Agency Research on Cancer that shift-work that involves circadian disruption is probably carcinogenic to humans.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 403  
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