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Author Da Silva, A.; Valcu, M.; Kempenaers, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Behavioural plasticity in the onset of dawn song under intermittent experimental night lighting Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication (up) Animal Behaviour Abbreviated Journal Animal Behaviour  
  Volume 117 Issue Pages 155-165  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract The disruption of daily rhythms is one of the most studied ecological consequences of light pollution. Previous work showed that several songbird species initiated dawn song earlier in areas with light pollution. However, the mechanisms underlying this shift are still unknown. Individuals may immediately adjust their timing of singing to the presence of artificial light (behavioural plasticity), but the observed effect may also be due to phenotype-dependent habitat choice, effects of conditions during early life or micro-evolution. The main aim of this study was to experimentally investigate how males of four common passerine species respond to day-to-day variation in the presence of artificial night lighting in terms of the timing of singing. During two consecutive breeding seasons, we manipulated the presence of light throughout the night in a cyclic fashion in several naturally undisturbed forest patches. We show that individuals of all four species immediately and reversibly adjusted their onset of dawn singing in response to artificial light. The effect was strongest in the European robin, but relatively small in the blue tit, the great tit and the blackbird. The effect in the latter two species was smaller than expected from the correlational studies. This may be coincidence (small sample size of this study), but it could also indicate that there are longer-term effects of living in light-polluted urban areas on timing of dawn singing, or that birds use compensatory behaviours such as light avoidance. We found no evidence that our light treatment had carryover effects into the subsequent dark period, but robins progressively advanced their dawn singing during the light treatment.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0003-3472 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1467  
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Author Botha, L.M.; Jones, T.M.; Hopkins, G.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of lifetime exposure to artificial light at night on cricket ( Teleogryllus commodus ) courtship and mating behaviour Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Animal Behaviour Abbreviated Journal Animal Behaviour  
  Volume 129 Issue Pages 181-188  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Increasing evidence suggests that key fitness-related behaviours of animals related to courtship and mating may be disrupted by anthropogenic stressors, including artificial light at night (i.e. light produced from anthropogenic sources). Despite its ubiquity in urban habitats, we currently know very little about how artificial night lighting affects the reproductive behaviours of most animals. Our study examined the effects of chronic (lifetime) exposure to one of four ecologically relevant intensities of artificial light at night (0, 1, 10 or 100 lx at night) on courtship and mating behaviours and acoustic sexual signalling in a common nocturnal and crepuscular insect, the Australian black field cricket, Teleogryllus commodus. We found that lifetime exposure to brighter (10–100 lx) artificial light at night affected some aspects of courtship and mating behaviour: it influenced mate choice and mating efficiency in a sex-specific manner, but did not affect the multivariate structure of male courtship calls. Our results suggest that chronic exposure to bright light at night may affect some aspects of mate choice and reproductive behaviour in this common insect, and warrants further study across taxa.  
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  ISSN 0003-3472 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1671  
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Author Jha, N.A.; Kumar, V. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of no-night light environment on behaviour, learning performance and personality in zebra finches Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Animal Behaviour Abbreviated Journal Animal Behaviour  
  Volume 132 Issue Pages 29-47  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract A periodic day–night environment is critical for daily behavioural patterns and advanced brain functions such as learning and cognition in animals. We investigated whether a no-night light environment would impair these functions in parent and F1 and F2 zebra finches, Taeniopygia guttata. Particularly, we examined song acquisition as a measure of learning, tested cognitive performance with reference to spatial and colour association tasks, and assessed personality with respect to an exploratory trait, first in the parent (P) and subsequently in F1 and F2 birds born and raised under 12:12 h light:dark or constant light (hence no-night, LL) environments. Daily patterns in activity and singing were monitored as circadian response indicators. After initial decay, the rhythmic patterns in daily activity and singing were restored after several weeks in the majority of P and F1 birds under LL; F2 birds displayed robust circadian rhythms in both behavioural patterns under LL. Further, LL decreased participation and performance in cognitive tests and reduced exploratory behaviour in birds from all generations. Overall, we found negative effects of the LL environment on daily behavioural patterns, advanced brain functions (i.e. learning and cognition) and personality in zebra finches when adult and in subsequent generations. These results give insights into the possible impact on animals of night-time illumination such as in an overly lit urban habitat.  
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  ISSN 0003-3472 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1733  
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Author Robertson, B.A.; Keddy-Hector, I.A.; Shrestha, S.D.; Silverberg, L.Y.; Woolner, C.E.; Hetterich, I.; Horváth, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Susceptibility to ecological traps is similar among closely related taxa but sensitive to spatial isolation Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication (up) Animal Behaviour Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 135 Issue Pages 77-84  
  Keywords aquatic insect; behaviour; evolutionary trap; light pollution; maladaptation; polarized light pollution  
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  ISSN 0003-3472 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1793  
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Author Rodríguez, A.; Rodríguez, B.; Curbelo, Á.J.; Pérez, A.; Marrero, S.; Negro, J.J.; Katzner, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Factors affecting mortality of shearwaters stranded by light pollution: Mortality of shearwaters attracted by light pollution Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication (up) Animal Conservation Abbreviated Journal Anim Conserv  
  Volume 15 Issue 5 Pages 519-526  
  Keywords Cory's shearwater; Calonectris diomedea; birds; petrels; collisions; animals  
  Abstract Every year and across the world, thousands of fledglings of different petrel species crash into human structures because they are disorientated by artificial lights during their first flights. As this phenomenon is rather predictable, rescue campaigns are organized to help birds to reach the ocean, but unfortunately, a low proportion gets hurt or dies. Despite the huge number of affected individuals, and the fact that the problem was detected a long time ago, little is known on this source of mortality. We have studied the factors (i.e. body condition, plumage development, fledging date and sex) influencing the mortality of Cory's Shearwater Calonectris diomedea fledglings stranded inland due to light pollution in Tenerife (Canary Islands) during two consecutive breeding seasons (2009 and 2010). Late fledglings showed lower values of a body condition index than early ones. No sex biases were detected, neither considering stranded birds overall, nor for recovery dates or in the body condition of rescued fledglings. Our results indicate that late birds stranded by lights showing abundant down are more susceptible to fatal collisions and that the lights do not selectively kill birds with lower body condition indices. An enhancement of veterinary care should be done during the last part of the fledging period when more fatal collisions occur, especially focused on fledglings with abundant down. More research to determine why some individuals end up disoriented around artificial lights and others do not is urgently needed to minimize or prevent fallouts.  
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  ISSN 1367-9430 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 55  
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