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Author O'Connell, H. A.
Title Streetlights in the city: understanding the distribution of Houston streetlights Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Lighting; Society
Abstract There are at least 173,724 streetlights in the city of Houston, or about 15 streetlights per mile of roadway in the average Houston neighborhood. But there is wide variation in streetlight density across those neighborhoods. This report offers several important findings. First, black and Hispanic neighborhoods have higher concentrations of streetlights than white neighborhoods. Second, mixed-income neighborhoods tend to have higher concentrations of streetlights than the city’s wealthiest and poorest neighborhoods.

In the context of this discussion, we should consider the possibility that some areas of the city are overly lit in addition to being concerned about the places without enough lights. There may be a point at which having more lights actually becomes a negative. We need to get a better understanding of the lived consequences of the level of available lighting before making any further decisions regarding city streetlights.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher (down) Rice | Kinder Institute for urban research Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2068
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Author Zielinska-Dabkowska, K.M.
Title Urban Lighting Masterplan—Definitions, Methodologies and Collaboration Type Book Chapter
Year 2019 Publication Urban Lighting for People: Evidence—Based Lighting Design for the Built Environment Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 18–41
Keywords Planning
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher (down) RIBA Publishing Place of Publication London, UK Editor Davoudian, N.
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 9780367814588 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2934
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Author Langill, P., George, B.
Title Quantifying and Monitoring Darkness over the RAO Type Magazine Article
Year 2017 Publication Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada Abbreviated Journal JRASC
Volume 111 Issue 2 Pages 47-52
Keywords Skyglow; Canada; SQM; Calgary
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher (down) RASC Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0035-872X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1656
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Author Li, Y.; Cheng, S.; Li, L.; Zhao, Y.; Shen, W.; Sun, X.
Title Light-exposure at night impairs mouse ovary development via cell apoptosis and DNA damage Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Bioscience Reports Abbreviated Journal Biosci Rep
Volume 39 Issue Pages BSR20181464
Keywords Human Health; Animals; mouse models; ovaries
Abstract The alternation of light and dark rhythm causes a series of physiological, biochemical and metabolic changes in animals, which also alters the growth and development of animals, and feeding, migration, reproduction and other behavioral activities. In recent years, many studies have reported the effects of long-term (more than 6 weeks) illumination on ovarian growth and development. In this study, we observed the damage, repair and apoptosis of ovarian DNA in a short period of illumination. The results showed that, in short time (less than 2 weeks) illumination conditions, the 24 hrs-light treatment caused the reduction of total ovarian follicle number and downregulation of circadian clock related genes. Furthermore, the changed levels of serum sex hormones were also detected after 24 hrs-light exposure, of which the concentrations of LH (luteinizing hormone), FSH (follicle-stimulating hormone) and E2 (estradiol) were increased, but the concentration of PROG (progesterone) was decreased. Moreover, 24 hrs-light exposure increased the expression of DNA damage and repair related genes, the number of TUNEL and RAD51 positive cells. These results indicated that 24 hrs-light exposure for 4 days, 8days and 12 days increased DNA damage and cell apoptosis, thereby affecting the development of ovary.
Address Qingdao agricultural university, Qingdao, China; xfsun@qau.edu.cn
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher (down) Portland Press Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0144-8463 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30962269 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2293
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Author Van Doren, B.; Horton, K.G.; Dokter, A.M.; Klinck, H.; Elbin, S.B., Farnsworth, A.; Dokter, A.M; Klinck, H.; Elbin, S.B.; Farnsworth, A.
Title High-intensity urban light installation dramatically alters nocturnal bird migration Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Publications of the National Academy of Sciences Abbreviated Journal PNAS
Volume 114 Issue 42 Pages 11175-11180
Keywords Animals; artificial light; nocturnal migration; remote sensing; radar; ornithology; flight calls
Abstract Billions of nocturnally migrating birds move through increasingly photopolluted skies, relying on cues for navigation and orientation that artificial light at night (ALAN) can impair. However, no studies have quantified avian responses to powerful ground-based light sources in urban areas. We studied effects of ALAN on migrating birds by monitoring the beams of the National September 11 Memorial & Museum's “Tribute in Light” in New York, quantifying behavioral responses with radar and acoustic sensors and modeling disorientation and attraction with simulations. This single light source induced significant behavioral alterations in birds, even in good visibility conditions, in this heavily photopolluted environment, and to altitudes up to 4 km. We estimate that the installation influenced ≈1.1 million birds during our study period of 7 d over 7 y. When the installation was illuminated, birds aggregated in high densities, decreased flight speeds, followed circular flight paths, and vocalized frequently. Simulations revealed a high probability of disorientation and subsequent attraction for nearby birds, and bird densities near the installation exceeded magnitudes 20 times greater than surrounding baseline densities during each year’s observations. However, behavioral disruptions disappeared when lights were extinguished, suggesting that selective removal of light during nights with substantial bird migration is a viable strategy for minimizing potentially fatal interactions among ALAN, structures, and birds. Our results also highlight the value of additional studies describing behavioral patterns of nocturnally migrating birds in powerful lights in urban areas as well as conservation implications for such lighting installations.
Address Information Science Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, NY 14850 USA; af27{at}cornell.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher (down) PNAS Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1091-6490 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1741
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