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Author Walker, W.H. 2nd; Borniger, J.C.; Gaudier-Diaz, M.M.; Hecmarie Melendez-Fernandez, O.; Pascoe, J.L.; Courtney DeVries, A.; Nelson, R.J.
Title Acute exposure to low-level light at night is sufficient to induce neurological changes and depressive-like behavior Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Molecular Psychiatry Abbreviated Journal Mol Psychiatry
Volume Issue Pages s41380-019-0430-4
Keywords Human health; physiology; brain
Abstract The advent and wide-spread adoption of electric lighting over the past century has profoundly affected the circadian organization of physiology and behavior for many individuals in industrialized nations; electric lighting in homes, work environments, and public areas have extended daytime activities into the evening, thus, increasing night-time exposure to light. Although initially assumed to be innocuous, chronic exposure to light at night (LAN) is now associated with increased incidence of cancer, metabolic disorders, and affective problems in humans. However, little is known about potential acute effects of LAN. To determine whether acute exposure to low-level LAN alters brain function, adult male, and female mice were housed in either light days and dark nights (LD; 14 h of 150 lux:10 h of 0 lux) or light days and low level light at night (LAN; 14 h of 150 lux:10 h of 5 lux). Mice exposed to LAN on three consecutive nights increased depressive-like responses compared to mice housed in dark nights. In addition, female mice exposed to LAN increased central tendency in the open field. LAN was associated with reduced hippocampal vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) in both male and female mice, as well as increased VEGFR1 and interleukin-1beta mRNA expression in females, and reduced brain derived neurotrophic factor mRNA in males. Further, LAN significantly altered circadian rhythms (activity and temperature) and circadian gene expression in female and male mice, respectively. Altogether, this study demonstrates that acute exposure to LAN alters brain physiology and can be detrimental to well-being in otherwise healthy individuals.
Address Department of Rockefeller Neuroscience Institute, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, 26506, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher (down) Nature Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1359-4184 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31138889 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2509
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Author Schirmer, A.E.; Gallemore, C.; Liu, T.; Magle, S.; DiNello, E.; Ahmed, H.; Gilday, T.
Title Mapping behaviorally relevant light pollution levels to improve urban habitat planning Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 1-13
Keywords Animals; Remote Sensing; Society; remote sensing; cities; Urban planning; urban wildlife; urban ecology
Abstract Artificial nighttime lights have important behavioral and ecological effects on wildlife. Combining laboratory and field techniques, we identified behaviorally relevant levels of nighttime light and mapped the extent of these light levels across the city of Chicago. We began by applying a Gaussian finite mixture model to 998 sampled illumination levels around Chicago to identify clusters of light levels. A simplified sample of these levels was replicated in the laboratory to identify light levels at which C57BL/6J mice exhibited altered circadian activity patterns. We then used camera trap and high-altitude photographic data to compare our field and laboratory observations, finding activity pattern changes in the field consistent with laboratory observations. Using these results, we mapped areas across Chicago exposed to estimated illumination levels above the value associated with statistically significant behavioral changes. Based on this measure, we found that as much as 36% of the greenspace in the city is in areas illuminated at levels greater than or equal to those at which we observe behavioral differences in the field and in the laboratory. Our findings provide evidence that artificial lighting patterns may influence wildlife behavior at a broad scale throughout urban areas, and should be considered in urban habitat planning.
Address Northeastern Illinois University, Dept. of Biology, 5500 St. Louis Ave., Chicago, IL, 60625, USA; a-schirmer(at) neiu.edu)
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher (down) Nature Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2615
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Author Dautovich, N.D.; Schreiber, D.R.; Imel, J.L.; Tighe, C.A.; Shoji, K.D.; Cyrus, J.; Bryant, N.; Lisech, A.; O'Brien, C.; Dzierzewski, J.M.
Title A systematic review of the amount and timing of light in association with objective and subjective sleep outcomes in community-dwelling adults Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Sleep Health Abbreviated Journal Sleep Health
Volume 5 Issue 1 Pages 31–48
Keywords Human Health; Review; light timing; Sleep
Abstract Light is considered the dominant environmental cue, or zeitgeber, influencing the sleep-wake cycle. Despite recognizing the importance of light for our well-being, less is known about the specific conditions under which light is optimally associated with better sleep. Therefore, a systematic review was conducted to examine the association between the amount and timing of light exposure in relation to sleep outcomes in healthy, community-dwelling adults. A systematic search was conducted of four databases from database inception to June 2016. In total, 45 studies met the review eligibility criteria with generally high study quality excepting for the specification of eligibility criteria and the justification of sample size. The majority of studies involved experimental manipulation of light (n = 32) vs observational designs (n = 13). Broad trends emerged suggesting that (1) bright light (>1000 lux) has positive implications for objectively assessed sleep outcomes compared to dim (<100 lux) and moderate light (100-1000 lux) and (2) bright light (>1000 lux) has positive implications for subjectively assessed sleep outcomes compared to moderate light (100-1000 lux). Effects due to the amount of light are moderated by the timing of light exposure such that, for objectively assessed sleep outcomes, brighter morning and evening light exposure are consistent with a shift in the timing of the sleep period to earlier and later in the day, respectively. For subjectively assessed sleep outcomes, brighter light delivered in the morning was associated with self-reported sleep improvements and brighter evening light exposure was associated with worse self-reported sleep.
Address Psychology Department, Virginia Commonwealth University, 800 W Franklin St, Room 203, PO Box 842018, Richmond, VA 23284-2018 USA; ndautovich(at)vcu.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher (down) National Sleep Foundation Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2352-7218 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2050
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Author Manning, R.; Rovelstad, E.; Moore, C.; Hallo, J.; Smith, B.
Title Indicators and standards of quality for viewing the night sky in the national parks Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication ParkScience Abbreviated Journal ParkScience
Volume 32 Issue 1 Pages
Keywords Society; National parks; resource management; National Park Service; Acadia National Park
Abstract Night skies are increasingly recognized as an important park resource that demands more management attention. Management of night skies can be guided by a management-by-objectives framework that requires formulation of indicators and standards of quality. Two surveys were conducted at Acadia National Park to identify indicators and standards for stargazing. The first survey used an importance –performance approach and documented light pollution as an important indicator variable. The second survey used a normative approach and visual simulations to identify a range of standards of quality for light pollution. This program of research was designed to help inform management of night skies at Acadia and other parks.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher (down) National Park Service Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1090-9966 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1285
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Author Bergs, R.
Title Exploring the Spatial Economy by Night Type Report
Year 2016 Publication n/a Abbreviated Journal n/a
Volume n/a Issue n/a Pages n/a
Keywords Economics; DMSP; DMSP-OLS; remote sensing; spatial distribution
Abstract Night satellite images may offer an interesting tool to generate socio-economically relevant data and to analyse the evolution of space, e.g. cities or rural areas, and how spatial units interact over time. This paper is just an essay with preliminary ideas for discussion; the approach is explorative-methodological rather than one putting an empirical focus on a defined research item. Empirics discussed in this paper are just various examples collected from tinkering.

The DMSP-OLS images and adequate image analysis software such as ImageJ (in some cases to be complemented by further statistics software) provide a useful perspective for the analysis of spatial change. Since there is a stable and significant correlation between social and economic variables (population density, GDP PPP) and luminosity, such image analyses contain important information on spatial economic development. Analysis of night imagery is certainly not adequate to replace the statistical analysis of regional data, but it is a good tool to confirm and illustrate patterns of spatial heterogeneity and spatial dependence over time.
Address PRAC – Bergs & Issa Partnership Co., Bad Soden, Germany
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher (down) n/a Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Planung & Forschung Spolicy Research & Consultancy Discussion Paper Series Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN n/a ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1392
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