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Author Poulin, C.; Bruyant, F.; Laprise, M.-H.; Cockshutt, A.M.; Marie-Rose Vandenhecke, J.; Huot, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The impact of light pollution on diel changes in the photophysiology of Microcystis aeruginosa Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Plankton Research Abbreviated Journal Journal of Plankton Research  
  Volume 36 Issue 1 Pages 286-291  
  Keywords light pollution; Microcystis aeruginosa; Cyanobacteria; diel cycles; biology; plankton  
  Abstract Assessing the effect of light pollution, Microcystis aeruginosa was grown with and without low levels of night lighting. Significant differences were observed between the treatments in the maximum quantum yield of charge separation, the intracellular chlorophyll a concentration, the functional absorption cross-section of photosystem II, the number of Rubisco per cell and per chlorophyll a, the number of photosystem I per chlorophyll a, and the chlorophyll a fraction not bound to the photosystems and IsiA.  
  Address Departement de Geomatique Appliquee, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC J1K 2R1, Canada  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher (down) Oxford Journals Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0142-7873 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 352  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Crumey, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Human Contrast Threshold and Astronomical Visibility. Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Abbreviated Journal MNRAS  
  Volume 422 Issue 3 Pages 2600-2619  
  Keywords Vision; visibility; skyglow; sky brightness; modeling  
  Abstract The standard visibility model in light-pollution studies is the formula of Hecht, as used e.g. by Schaefer. However, it is applicable only to point sources and is shown to be of limited accuracy. A new visibility model is presented for uniform achromatic targets of any size against background luminances ranging from zero to full daylight, produced by a systematic procedure applicable to any appropriate data set (e.g. Blackwell's), and based on a simple but previously unrecognized empirical relation between contrast threshold and adaptation luminance. The scotopic luminance correction for variable spectral radiance (colour index) is calculated. For point sources, the model is more accurate than Hecht's formula and is verified using telescopic data collected at Mount Wilson in 1947, enabling the sky brightness at that time to be determined. The result is darker than the calculation by Garstang, implying that light pollution grew more rapidly in subsequent decades than has been supposed. The model is applied to the nebular observations of William Herschel, enabling his visual performance to be quantified. Proposals are made regarding sky quality indicators for public use.  
  Address Department of Humanities, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 8ST, UK; andrew.crumey(at)northumbria.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher (down) Oxford Journals Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0035-8711 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 536  
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Author Kurvers, R.H.J.M.; Hölker, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Bright nights and social interactions: a neglected issue Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Behavioral Ecology Abbreviated Journal Behav. Ecol.  
  Volume 26 Issue 2 Pages 334-339  
  Keywords Ecology; group dynamics; light at night; light pollution; social consequence; social interactions; social synchrony  
  Abstract Artificial light at night is an increasing threat for ecological processes. Previous work has highlighted the effects of nighttime light on individuals and on higher levels of biological organization, such as community ecology and ecosystem functioning. Here, we focus on the effects of artificial light at night on social interactions and group dynamics. We discuss 4 main ways of how light pollution is expected to alter social interactions and group dynamics. First, light at night can alter the activity patterns of individuals and this is predicted to affect the social network structure of populations, which in turn affects the transfer of information and diseases. Second, changes in activity patterns and disrupted biological rhythms are expected to reduce behavioral synchrony in social processes such as reproduction, migration, and dispersal. Third, increased light at night is expected to affect the communication between individuals; primarily, it will increase the opportunities for visual social information transfer. Last, artificial nighttime light is expected to lower social competence, with subsequent negative effects on aggressive interactions and group coordination. Throughout the article, we propose testable hypotheses and identify suitable study species, and we hope that this article inspires future research on the effects of bright nights on social interactions and group dynamics.  
  Address Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Müggelseedamm 310, 12587 Berlin, Germany  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher (down) Oxford Journals Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1082  
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Author Kocifaj, M.; Solano Lamphar, H.A.; Kundracik, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Retrieval of Garstang's emission function from all-sky camera images Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Abbreviated Journal Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc.  
  Volume 453 Issue 1 Pages 819-827  
  Keywords Skyglow; scattering; atmospheric effects; light pollution; methods: data analysis; methods: numerical methods: observational  
  Abstract The emission function from ground-based light sources predetermines the skyglow features to a large extent, while most mathematical models that are used to predict the night sky brightness require the information on this function. The radiant intensity distribution on a clear sky is experimentally determined as a function of zenith angle using the theoretical approach published only recently in MNRAS, 439, 3405–3413. We have made the experiments in two localities in Slovakia and Mexico by means of two digital single lens reflex professional cameras operating with different lenses that limit the system's field-of-view to either 180º or 167º. The purpose of using two cameras was to identify variances between two different apertures. Images are taken at different distances from an artificial light source (a city) with intention to determine the ratio of zenith radiance relative to horizontal irradiance. Subsequently, the information on the fraction of the light radiated directly into the upward hemisphere (F) is extracted. The results show that inexpensive devices can properly identify the upward emissions with adequate reliability as long as the clear sky radiance distribution is dominated by a largest ground-based light source. Highly unstable turbidity conditions can also make the parameter F difficult to find or even impossible to retrieve. The measurements at low elevation angles should be avoided due to a potentially parasitic effect of direct light emissions from luminaires surrounding the measuring site.  
  Address ICA, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská Road 9, 845 03 Bratislava, Slovak Republic; kocifaj(at)savba.sk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher (down) Oxford Journals Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0035-8711 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1249  
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Author Newman, R.C.; Ellis, T.; Davison, P.I.; Ives, M.J.; Thomas, R.J.; Griffiths, S.W.; Riley, W.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Using novel methodologies to examine the impact of artificial light at night on the cortisol stress response in dispersing Atlantic salmon (Salmo salarL.) fry Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Conservation Physiology Abbreviated Journal Conserv Physiol  
  Volume 3 Issue 1 Pages cov051  
  Keywords Animals; salmon; Salmo salar; Artificial light at night; Atlantic salmon; cortisol  
  Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is gaining recognition as having an important anthropogenic impact on the environment, yet the behavioural and physiological impacts of this stressor are largely unknown. This dearth of information is particularly true for freshwater ecosystems, which are already heavily impacted by anthropogenic pressures. Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) is a species of conservation and economic importance whose ecology and behaviour is well studied, making it an ideal model species. Recent investigations have demonstrated that salmon show disrupted behaviour in response to artificial light; however, it is not yet clear which physiological processes are behind the observed behavioural modifications. Here, two novel non-invasive sampling methods were used to examine the cortisol stress response of dispersing salmon fry under different artificial lighting intensities. Fish egg and embryos were reared under differing ALAN intensities and individual measures of stress were subsequently taken from dispersing fry using static sampling, whereas population-level measures were achieved using deployed passive samplers. Dispersing fry exposed to experimental confinement showed elevated cortisol levels, indicating the capacity to mount a stress response at this early stage in ontogenesis. However, only one of the two methods for sampling cortisol used in this study indicated that ALAN may act as a stressor to dispersing salmon fry. As such, a cortisol-mediated response to light was not strongly supported. Furthermore, the efficacy of the two non-invasive methodologies used in this study is, subject to further validation, indicative of them proving useful in future ecological studies.  
  Address School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Museum Avenue, Cardiff CF10 3AX, UK. Tel: +44 (0) 2920 875 729; newmanrc(at)cardiff.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher (down) Oxford Journals Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2051-1434 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1397  
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