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Author Olsen, R.N.; Gallaway, T.; Mitchell, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Modelling US light pollution Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Environmental Planning and Management Abbreviated Journal Journal of Environmental Planning and Management  
  Volume 57 Issue 6 Pages 883-903  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Economics; Economic development; population  
  Abstract This paper uses a unique US dataset to study the economic causes of light pollution at the local (county) level. Light pollution has been shown to have negative consequences for both wildlife and humans. Light pollution is a form of pollution commonly ignored by environmental professionals. Traditionally, light-pollution models focus on population-based explanations. This paper confirms the importance of population in understanding light pollution. However, the results highlight the importance of economic variables, especially local economic development, in explaining the existence and extent of light pollution. Estimated models show, for example, that local employment patterns, personal income, roads and energy use are all important explanatory variables. By highlighting the connections between light pollution and specific types of local economic activity, this paper provides policy makers with additional information that they can use to improve public policies intended to safeguard the environment and local wildlife.  
  Address Department of Economics, Missouri State University, 901 South National Avenue, Springfield, MO 65897, USA; reedolsen(at)missouristate.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher (down) Taylor & Francis Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0964-0568 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 580  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Edensor, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Introduction: Sensing and Perceiving with Light and Dark Type Book Chapter
  Year 2015 Publication The Senses and Society Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 10 Issue 2 Pages 129-137  
  Keywords Psychology  
  Abstract  
  Address t.edensor(at)mmu.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher (down) Taylor & Francis Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1238  
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Author Taylor, C.R., Sarkees, M.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Do bans on illuminated on-premise signs matter? Balancing environmental impact with the impact on businesses Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication International Journal of Advertising: The Review of Marketing Communications Abbreviated Journal Intl. J. of Advertising Rev. Marketing Comm.  
  Volume 36 Issue 1 Pages 61-73  
  Keywords Economics; illuminated signs; advertising; society; policy  
  Abstract Recent years have seen some US municipalities implementing restrictions on lighted on-premise signs, often based on environmental arguments. At the same time, sign companies and sign users argue that restrictions are harmful to businesses. To date there has not been any research on the degree to which restrictions on illuminated signs are harmful to businesses. To this end, this study reports the results of a nationally representative sample of on-premise sign users which explores the degree to which sign users: (1) rely on the signs to help them perform key marketing functions; and (2) report that these signs impact their bottom line. Findings indicate that respondents strongly agree that lighted on-premise signs perform key marketing functions for them and a majority of respondents believe that restrictions on lighting harm their profitability.  
  Address Department of Marketing, Villanova School of Business, Villanova University, 19085-1678, Villanova, PA, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher (down) Taylor & Francis Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1239  
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Author Zhuo, L.; Zheng, J.; Zhang, X.; Li, J.; Liu, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title An improved method of night-time light saturation reduction based on EVI Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication International Journal of Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal International Journal of Remote Sensing  
  Volume 36 Issue 16 Pages 4114-4130  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; DMSP; DMSP-OLS; Nighttime Lights; NTL; VANUI; EVI; EANTLI; RCNTL; VIIRS  
  Abstract Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS) night-time light (NTL) data have been widely applied to studies on anthropogenic activities and their interactions with the environment. Due to limitations of the OLS sensor, DMSP NTL data suffer from a saturation problem in central urban areas, which further affects studies based on nocturnal lights. Recently, the vegetation-adjusted NTL urban index (VANUI) has been developed based on the inverse correlation of vegetation and urban surfaces. Despite its simple implementation and ability to effectively increase variations in NTL data, VANUI does not perform well in certain rapidly growing cities. In this study, we propose a new index, denoted enhanced vegetation index (EVI)-adjusted NTL index (EANTLI), that was developed by reforming the VANUI algorithm and utilizing the EVI. Comparisons with radiance-calibrated NTL (RCNTL) and the new Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) data for 15 cities worldwide show that EANTLI reduces saturation in urban cores and mitigates the blooming effect in suburban areas. EANTLI’s similarity to RCNTL and VIIRS is consistently higher than VANUI’s similarity to RCNTL and VIIRS in both spatial distribution and latitudinal transects. EANTLI also yields better results in the estimation of electric power consumption of 166 Chinese prefecture-level cities. In conclusion, EANTLI can effectively reduce NTL saturation in urban centres, thus presenting great potential for wide-range applications.  
  Address Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Urbanization and Geo-simulation, School of Geography and Planning, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275, PR China  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher (down) Taylor & Francis Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0143-1161 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1245  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Smolensky, M.H.; Sackett-Lundeen, L.L.; Portaluppi, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Nocturnal light pollution and underexposure to daytime sunlight: Complementary mechanisms of circadian disruption and related diseases Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-20  
  Keywords Human Health; Artificial light at night; cancer; circadian time structure; development and disruption; melatonin; sleep/wake cycle disturbance; sunlight; vitamin D; vitamin D deficiency; circadian time structure; circadian rhythm; desynchrony  
  Abstract Routine exposure to artificial light at night (ALAN) in work, home, and community settings is linked with increased risk of breast and prostate cancer (BC, PC) in normally sighted women and men, the hypothesized biological rhythm mechanisms being frequent nocturnal melatonin synthesis suppression, circadian time structure (CTS) desynchronization, and sleep/wake cycle disruption with sleep deprivation. ALAN-induced perturbation of the CTS melatonin synchronizer signal is communicated maternally at the very onset of life and after birth via breast or artificial formula feedings. Nighttime use of personal computers, mobile phones, electronic tablets, televisions, and the like – now epidemic in adolescents and adults and highly prevalent in pre-school and school-aged children – is a new source of ALAN. However, ALAN exposure occurs concomitantly with almost complete absence of daytime sunlight, whose blue-violet (446-484 nm lambda) spectrum synchronizes the CTS and whose UV-B (290-315 nm lambda) spectrum stimulates vitamin D synthesis. Under natural conditions and clear skies, day/night and annual cycles of UV-B irradiation drive corresponding periodicities in vitamin D synthesis and numerous bioprocesses regulated by active metabolites augment and strengthen the biological time structure. Vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency are widespread in children and adults in developed and developing countries as a consequence of inadequate sunlight exposure. Past epidemiologic studies have focused either on exposure to too little daytime UV-B or too much ALAN, respectively, on vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency or melatonin suppression in relation to risk of cancer and other, e.g., psychiatric, hypertensive, cardiac, and vascular, so-called, diseases of civilization. The observed elevated incidence of medical conditions the two are alleged to influence through many complementary bioprocesses of cells, tissues, and organs led us to examine effects of the totality of the artificial light environment in which humans reside today. Never have chronobiologic or epidemiologic investigations comprehensively researched the potentially deleterious consequences of the combination of suppressed vitamin D plus melatonin synthesis due to life in today's man-made artificial light environment, which in our opinion is long overdue.  
  Address c Hypertension Center, S. Anna University Hospital, University of Ferrara , Ferrara , Italy  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher (down) Taylor & Francis Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:26374931 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1271  
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