|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Gonzalez, S.A.; Yanez-Navea, K.; Munoz, M.
Title Effect of coastal urbanization on sandy beach coleoptera Phaleria maculata (Kulzer, 1959) in northern Chile Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Marine Pollution Bulletin Abbreviated Journal Mar Pollut Bull
Volume 83 Issue 1 Pages 265-274
Keywords Anthropogenic impact; Coastal urbanization index; Light pollution; Marine tenebrionid; Phaleria maculata; beetles; insects; urbanization; Chile; morphodynamics; Urbanization Index; indicator organisms
Abstract The beetle Phaleria maculata is a common inhabitant of the upper intertidal fringe of Chilean beaches. Anthropogenic intervention in coastal areas has increased intensely, leading to changes in the flora and fauna of sandy beaches. To examine the impact of human activities on P. maculata, we studied several beaches along the northern Chilean coast. Beaches were characterized based on morphodynamics and the level of intervention, leading to the estimation of an “Urbanization Index” based on various indicators. The analysis showed a significant inverse correlation between the rate of urbanization and night sky quality. Larval and adult beetles were almost absent on beaches with high levels of urbanization. The results of simple and multiple correlations based on nMDS ordination showed an inverse relationship between increases in urbanization and the abundance of beetles. Because darkling beetles are very sensitive to human interventions on sandy beaches, we suggest that they are ideal indicator organisms for the health of these environments.
Address Departamento de Biologia Marina, Facultad de Ciencias del Mar, Universidad Catolica del Norte, Casilla 117, Coquimbo, Chile
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher (up) Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0025-326X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:24768173 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 308
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Fotios, S.; Yang, B.; Uttley, J.
Title Observing other pedestrians: Investigating the typical distance and duration of fixation Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Lighting Research and Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research and Technologying Res & Tech
Volume 47 Issue 5 Pages 548-564
Keywords traffic safety; pedestrians; roadway lighting; visibility; light at night
Abstract After dark, road lighting should enhance the visual component of pedestrians’ interpersonal judgements such as evaluating the intent of others. Investigation of lighting effects requires better understanding of the nature of this task as expressed by the typical distance at which the judgement is made (and hence visual size) and the duration of observation, which in past studies have been arbitrary. Better understanding will help with interpretation of the significance of lighting characteristics such as illuminance and light spectrum. Conclusions of comfort distance in past studies are not consistent and hence this article presents new data determined using eye-tracking. We propose that further work on interpersonal judgements should examine the effects of lighting at a distance of 15 m with an observation duration of 500 ms.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher (up) Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 309
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Georgiadis, M.; Mavraki, N.; Koutsikopoulos, C.; Tzanatos, E.
Title Spatio-temporal dynamics and management implications of the nightly appearance of Boops boops (Acanthopterygii, Perciformes) juvenile shoals in the anthropogenically modified Mediterranean littoral zone Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Hydrobiologia Abbreviated Journal Hydrobiologia
Volume 734 Issue 1 Pages 81-96
Keywords seabreams; animals; Boops boops; fishes; Aegean; Mediterranean; littoral; light at night; anthropogenic modification; fisheries management; light pollution
Abstract A remarkable phenomenon of dense Boops boops shoals appearing almost adjacent to the shoreline during nighttime is known to the locals of island communities of the Aegean Sea (eastern Mediterranean). In this work, we investigated this appearance testing the hypotheses that (a) it may occur only in anthropogenically modified locations (as suggested by previous observations), (b) the migration pattern to the littoral is not arbitrary but synchronized to the sunset/sunrise, (c) fish abundance is affected by location, season and/or natural (moon) light fluctuations. Quantitative sampling included visual observations from the coast at five stations in Syros (Cyclades, Greece) from July 2009 to September 2010. Both hypotheses concerning occurrence only in anthropogenically modified locations and timing with sunset/sunrise were confirmed. Fish abundance was modelled using generalized additive models, demonstrating a seasonal pattern and revealing significant differences among sampling stations, but no moon-phase effects. The phenomenon investigated here has implications for fisheries management, as the shoal proximity to the shore renders them prone to illegal harvesting (seasonally at high abundances), aggravating the problem of illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing. Further considerations on the integrated management of the coastal zone arise, especially concerning the effects of habitat structural modification and light pollution.
Address Department of Biology, Section of Animal Biology, University of Patras, 26504, Rio, Patras, Greece
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher (up) Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0018-8158 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 311
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bashiri, F.; Hassan, C.R.C.
Title Light Pollution and Its Effect on the Environment Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication International Journal of Fundamental Physical Sciences Abbreviated Journal Intl. J. of Fundamental Phys. Sci.
Volume 4 Issue 1 Pages 8-12
Keywords Light pollution, human health, animal behaviour, plant growth
Abstract Light pollution can cause disturbance to humans as well as animals. The aim of this study is to determine the effect of light pollution on human's health, plants, animals, human body and People’s attitude about light pollution. About 90% of people strongly agreed that excessive lighting has adverse effects on a person's health. At least, 70% of people had difficulty in sleeping because of light pollution. Most of people believed that video Billboards, Spotlights, Car headlights and Street lights are the most important source of light pollution and about 60% of people agree that light pollution can affect animal’s sleep. 60% of people believed that excessive artificial light can attract several kinks of birds and insects. The results of this study indicate that the human health, plants growth and animal behaviour are strongly affected by the light pollution.‎
Address Faculty of Engineering University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher (up) Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 313
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Landgraf, D.; McCarthy, M.J.; Welsh, D.K.
Title The role of the circadian clock in animal models of mood disorders Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Behavioral Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Behav Neurosci
Volume 128 Issue 3 Pages 344-359
Keywords *Circadian Rhythm; mood; mood disorders; circadian disruption
Abstract An association between circadian clock function and mood regulation is well established and has been proposed as a factor in the development of mood disorders. Patients with depression or mania suffer disturbed sleep-wake cycles and altered rhythms in daily activities. Environmentally disrupted circadian rhythms increase the risk of mood disorders in the general population. However, proof that a disturbance of circadian rhythms is causally involved in the development of psychiatric disorders remains elusive. Using clock gene mutants, manipulations of sleep-wake and light-dark cycles, and brain lesions affecting clock function, animal models have been developed to investigate whether circadian rhythm disruptions alter mood. In this review, selected animal models are examined to address the issue of causality between circadian rhythms and affective behavior.
Address Research Service, Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher (up) Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0735-7044 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:24660657 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 316
Permanent link to this record