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Author Touzot, M.; Lengagne, T.; Secondi, J.; Desouhant, E.; Théry, M.; Dumet, A.; Duchamp, C.; Mondy, N.
Title Artificial light at night alters the sexual behaviour and fertilisation success of the common toad Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Environmental Pollution Abbreviated Journal Environmental Pollution
Volume 259 Issue Pages in press
Keywords Animals
Abstract Artificial Light At Night (ALAN) is an emerging pollution, that dramatically keeps on increasing worldwide due to urbanisation and transport infrastructure development. In 2016, it nearly affected 23% of the Earth’s surface. To date, all terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems have been affected. The disruption of natural light cycles due to ALAN is particularly expected for nocturnal species, which require dark periods to forage, move, and reproduce. Apart from chiropterans, amphibians contain the largest proportion of nocturnal species among vertebrates exhibiting an unfavourable conservation status in most parts of the world and living in ALAN polluted areas. Despite the growing number of studies on this subject, our knowledge on the direct influence of nocturnal lighting on amphibians is still scarce. To better understand the consequences of ALAN on the breeding component of amphibian fitness, we experimentally exposed male breeding common toads (Bufo bufo) to ecologically relevant light intensities of 0.01 (control), 0.1 or 5 lux for 12 days. At mating, exposed males took longer than controls to form an amplexus, i.e. to pair with a female, and broke amplexus before egg laying, while controls never did. These behavioural changes were associated with fitness alteration. The fertilisation rate of 5 lux-exposed males was reduced by 25%. Salivary testosterone, which is usually correlated with reproductive behaviours, was not altered by ALAN. Our study demonstrates that ALAN can affect the breeding behaviour of anuran species and reduce one component of their fitness. Given the growing importance of ALAN, more work is needed to understand its long-term consequences on the behaviour and physiology of individuals. It appears essential to identify deleterious effects for animal populations and propose appropriate management solutions in an increasingly brighter world.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2813
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Author O'Connor, J.J.; Fobert, E.K.; Besson, M.; Jacob, H.; Lecchini, D.
Title Live fast, die young: Behavioural and physiological impacts of light pollution on a marine fish during larval recruitment Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Marine Pollution Bulletin Abbreviated Journal Mar Pollut Bull
Volume 146 Issue Pages 908-914
Keywords Animals; Ecosystem; Environmental Pollution/adverse effects; Fishes/growth & development/*physiology; Larva/growth & development/physiology/*radiation effects; Light/*adverse effects; Metamorphosis, Biological/radiation effects; Predatory Behavior/radiation effects; Coral reefs; Fish larvae; Light pollution; Metamorphosis; Recruitment
Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is a recently acknowledged form of anthropogenic pollution of growing concern to the biology and ecology of exposed organisms. Though ALAN can have detrimental effects on physiology and behaviour, we have little understanding of how marine organisms in coastal areas may be impacted. Here, we investigated the effects of ALAN exposure on coral reef fish larvae during the critical recruitment stage, encompassing settlement, metamorphosis, and post-settlement survival. We found that larvae avoided illuminated settlement habitats, however those living under ALAN conditions for 10days post-settlement experienced changes in swimming behaviour and higher susceptibility to nocturnal predation. Although ALAN-exposed fish grew faster and heavier than control fish, they also experienced significantly higher mortality rates by the end of the experimental period. This is the first study on the ecological impacts of ALAN during the early life history of marine fish.
Address Institute for Pacific Coral Reefs, IRCP, 98729, Moorea, French Polynesia; PSL Research University: EPHE-UPVD-CNRS, USR3278 CRIOBE, BP 1013, 98729 Papetoai, Moorea, French Polynesia; Laboratoire d'Excellence “CORAIL”, Moorea, French Polynesia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0025-326X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31426235 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2812
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Author Rumanova, V.S.; Okuliarova, M.; Molcan, L.; Sutovska, H.; Zeman, M.
Title Consequences of low-intensity light at night on cardiovascular and metabolic parameters in spontaneously hypertensive rats (1) Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Canadian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology Abbreviated Journal Can J Physiol Pharmacol
Volume 97 Issue 9 Pages 863-871
Keywords Animals; Ppar; blood pressure; circadian; circadien; insulin resistance; metabolism; metabolisme; recepteurs actives par les proliferateurs de peroxysomes; resistance a l'insuline; tension arterielle
Abstract Circadian rhythms are an inherent property of physiological processes and can be disturbed by irregular environmental cycles, including artificial light at night (ALAN). Circadian disruption may contribute to many pathologies, such as hypertension, obesity, and type 2 diabetes, but the underlying mechanisms are not understood. Our study investigated the consequences of ALAN on cardiovascular and metabolic parameters in spontaneously hypertensive rats, which represent an animal model of essential hypertension and insulin resistance. Adult males were exposed to a 12 h light – 12 h dark cycle and the ALAN group experienced dim light at night (1-2 lx), either for 2 or 5 weeks. Rats on ALAN showed a loss of light-dark variability for systolic blood pressure, but not for heart rate. Moreover, a gradual increase of systolic blood pressure was recorded over 5 weeks of ALAN. Exposure to ALAN increased plasma insulin and hepatic triglyceride levels. An increased expression of metabolic transcription factors, Pparalpha and Ppargamma, in the epididymal fat and a decreased expression of Glut4 in the heart was found in the ALAN group. Our results demonstrate that low-intensity ALAN can disturb blood pressure control and augment insulin resistance in spontaneously hypertensive rats, and may represent a serious risk factor for cardiometabolic diseases.
Address Department of Animal Physiology and Ethology, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University, Bratislava, Slovakia
Corporate Author Thesis
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0008-4212 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31251886 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2811
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Author Bará, S.; Rigueiro, I.; Lima, R.C.
Title Monitoring transition: Expected night sky brightness trends in different photometric bands Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer
Volume 239 Issue Pages 106644
Keywords Skyglow; Remote Sensing; Instrumentation
Abstract Several light pollution indicators are commonly used to monitor the effects of the transition from outdoor lighting systems based on traditional gas-discharge lamps to solid-state light sources. In this work we analyze a subset of these indicators, including the artificial zenithal night sky brightness in the visual photopic and scotopic bands, the brightness in the specific photometric band of the widely used Sky Quality Meter (SQM), and the top-of-atmosphere radiance detected by the VIIRS-DNB radiometer onboard the satellite Suomi-NPP. Using a single-scattering approximation in a layered atmosphere we quantitatively show that, depending on the transition scenarios, these indicators may show different, even opposite behaviors. This is mainly due to the combined effects of the changes in the sources' spectra and angular radiation patterns, the wavelength-dependent atmospheric propagation processes and the differences in the detector spectral sensitivity bands. It is suggested that the possible presence of this differential behavior should be taken into account when evaluating light pollution indicator datasets for assessing the outcomes of public policy decisions regarding the upgrading of outdoor lighting systems.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-4073 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2810
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Author Ayalon, I.; de Barros Marangoni, L.F.; Benichou, J.I.C.; Avisar, D.; Levy, O.
Title Red Sea corals under Artificial Light Pollution at Night (ALAN) undergo oxidative stress and photosynthetic impairment Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Global Change Biology Abbreviated Journal Glob Chang Biol
Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages 4194-4207
Keywords Animals; *Anthozoa; Coral Reefs; Ecosystem; Indian Ocean; Oxidative Stress; Photosynthesis; Alan; Ros; corals; light pollution; photosynthesis; physiology
Abstract Coral reefs represent the most diverse marine ecosystem on the planet, yet they are undergoing an unprecedented decline due to a combination of increasing global and local stressors. Despite the wealth of research investigating these stressors, Artificial Light Pollution at Night (ALAN) or “ecological light pollution” represents an emerging threat that has received little attention in the context of coral reefs, despite the potential of disrupting the chronobiology, physiology, behavior, and other biological processes of coral reef organisms. Scleractinian corals, the framework builders of coral reefs, depend on lunar illumination cues to synchronize their biological rhythms such as behavior, reproduction and physiology. While, light pollution (POL) may mask and lead de-synchronization of these biological rhythms process. To reveal if ALAN impacts coral physiology, we have studied two coral species, Acropora eurystoma and Pocillopora damicornis, from the Gulf of Eilat/Aqaba, Red Sea, which is undergoing urban development that has led to severe POL at night. Our two experimental design data revealed that corals exposed to ALAN face an oxidative stress condition, show lower photosynthesis performances measured by electron transport rate (ETR), as well as changes in chlorophyll and algae density parameters. Testing different lights such as Blue LED and White LED spectrum showed more extreme impact in comparison to Yellow LEDs on coral physiology. The finding of this work sheds light on the emerging threat of POL and the impacts on the biology and ecology of Scleractinian corals, and will help to formulate specific management implementations to mitigate its potentially harmful impacts.
Address Mina and Everard Goodman Faculty of Life Sciences, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan, Israel
Corporate Author Thesis
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31512309; PMCID:PMC6900201 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2809
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