|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Svechkina, A.; Trop, T.; Portnov, B.A.
Title How Much Lighting is Required to Feel Safe When Walking Through the Streets at Night? Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Sustainability Abbreviated Journal Sustainability
Volume 12 Issue 8 Pages 3133
Keywords Public Safety; Security
Abstract Public space lighting (PSL) is indispensable after the natural dark. However, little is known about how much PSL people actually need to feel sufficiently safe in different real-world urban settings. The present study attempts to answer this question by employing a novel real-time interactive approach, according to which, observers use a specially-designed mobile phone application to assess and report the perceived attributes of street lighting and the feeling of safety (FoS) it generates. To validate the proposed approach, a systematic survey was conducted in three cities in Israel—Tel Aviv-Yafo and Haifa, which lie on the Mediterranean coast, and Be’er Sheba, which lies inland. Additionally, instrumental PSL measurements were performed at the same locations. As the study reveals, the necessary level of illumination required by urban residents to feel safe differs by city and is significantly higher in Be’er Sheba, other factors held equal, in compare to Haifa and Tel Aviv-Yafo. This difference may be attributed to stronger daylight that the residents of the desert city of Be’er Sheba are accustomed to, and, therefore, may prefer stronger nighttime illumination. The difference could also be related to the relatively low socio-economic status and somewhat higher crime rates in the latter city. Findings also show a significant and positive association between FoS and instrumentally measured PSL levels, although this association exhibits diminishing returns. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to use an interactive location- and time-based mobile phone technology, which can potentially provide more accurate and reliable assessments, compared to traditional “pen and paper” survey techniques.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2071-1050 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2884
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Eberenz, S.; Stocker, D.; Röösli, T.; Bresch, D.N.
Title Asset exposure data for global physical risk assessment Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Earth System Science Data Abbreviated Journal Earth Syst. Sci. Data
Volume 12 Issue 2 Pages 817-833
Keywords Economics
Abstract One of the challenges in globally consistent assessments of physical climate risks is the fact thatasset exposure data are either unavailable or restricted to single countries or regions. We introduce a globalhigh-resolution asset exposure dataset responding to this challenge. The data are produced using “lit population”(LitPop), a globally consistent methodology to disaggregate asset value data proportional to a combination ofnightlight intensity and geographical population data. By combining nightlight and population data, unwantedartefacts such as blooming, saturation, and lack of detail are mitigated. Thus, the combination of both data typesimproves the spatial distribution of macroeconomic indicators. Due to the lack of reported subnational assetdata, the disaggregation methodology cannot be validated for asset values. Therefore, we compare disaggregatedgross domestic product (GDP) per subnational administrative region to reported gross regional product (GRP)values for evaluation. The comparison for 14 industrialized and newly industrialized countries shows that thedisaggregation skill for GDP using nightlights or population data alone is not as high as using a combinationof both data types. The advantages of LitPop are global consistency, scalability, openness, replicability, and lowentry threshold. The open-source LitPop methodology and the publicly available asset exposure data offer valuefor manifold use cases, including globally consistent economic disaster risk assessments and climate changeadaptation studies, especially for larger regions, yet at considerably high resolution. The code is published onGitHub as part of the open-source software CLIMADA (CLIMate ADAptation) and archived in the ETH DataArchive with the link https://doi.org/10.5905/ethz-1007-226 (Bresch et al., 2019b). The resulting asset exposuredataset for 224 countries is archived in the ETH Research Repository with the link https://doi.org/10.3929/ethz-b-000331316 (Eberenz et al., 2019).
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1866-3516 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2883
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Komine, H.; Koike, S.; Schwarzkopf, L.
Title Impacts of artificial light on food intake in invasive toads Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 6527
Keywords Animals
Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is a major form of anthropogenic disturbance. ALAN attracts nocturnal invertebrates, which are a food source for nocturnal predators, including invasive species. Few studies quantify the effects of increased food availablity by ALAN on invasive vertebrate predators, and enhancement of food intake caused by ALAN may also be influenced by various environmental factors, such as proximitity to cities, moon phase, temperature, rainfall and wind speed. Revealing the potential impacts on invasive predators of ALAN-attracted invertebrates, and the influence of other factors on these effects, could provide important insights for the management of these predators. We constructed and supplied with artificial light field enclosures for invasive toads, and placed them at locations with different levels of ambient light pollution, in northeastern Australia. In addition, we determined the effect of rainfall, temperature, wind speed, and lunar phase on food intake in toads. We found that ALAN greatly increased the mass of gut contents of invasive toads compared to controls, but that the effect was increased in dark lunar phases, and when there were low ambient light pollution levels. Effects of rainfall, temperature and wind speed on food intake were comparatively weak. To avoid providing food resources to toads, management of ALAN in rural areas, and during dark lunar phases may be advisable. On the contrary, to effectively capture toads, trapping using lights as lures at such times and places should be more successful.
Address College of Science and Engineering, Centre for Biodiversity & Climate Change, James Cook University, Townsville, 4811, Australia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32300179 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2882
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Pandharipande, A.; Ramasamy, S.; Anderson, J.
Title Social Impact of Connected Landmark Lighting: A Social Sensing Approach Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication IEEE Internet of Things Magazine Abbreviated Journal IEEE Internet Things M.
Volume 3 Issue 1 Pages 64-67
Keywords Lighting; Society
Abstract The benefits of using light emitting diode (LED) lighting for landmarks extend beyond energy savings to the use of illumination for creating visual identity, placemaking, and increasing tourism. While measuring energy consumption is possible with metering technologies, thereby quantifying savings in energy costs, quantification of the social impact of landmark lighting is not straightforward. Measuring and monitoring social impact metrics is key to stakeholders investing in new connected LED lighting systems or upgrades of conventional lighting in order to realize the benefits of lighting that are beyond energy sustainability. We consider social sensing as an approach to quantifying social impact of landmark lighting. Using lighting at the Empire State Building and Bay Bridge as case studies, social sensing querying and data analytics aspects are presented. A number of practical lessons and technical directions for the use of social sensing in connected landmark lighting are then laid out.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2576-3180 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2881
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Tong, K.P.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Heygster, G.; Kuechly, H.U.; Notholt, J.; Kolláth, Z.
Title Angular distribution of upwelling artificial light in Europe as observed by Suomi–NPP satellite Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer
Volume in press Issue Pages in press
Keywords Remote Sensing; Skyglow
Abstract Measuring the angular distribution of upwelling artificial light is important for modeling light pollution, because the direction of emission affects how light propagates in the atmosphere. We characterize the angular distributions of upwelling artificial light for Europe and northern Africa in 2018, based on night time radiance data for clear nights without twilight and moonlight from the VIIRS–DNB sensor on board the Suomi NPP satellite. We find that in general, suburban areas of major cities emit more light at larger zenith angles, whereas the opposite can be seen at the city centers, where the highest radiance is directed upward. The mean numbers of overflights for the year is 83, meaning that there are on average approximately seven suitable overflights per month. Future analysis may consider using moonlight models to compensate for the retrieval of moonlit scenes and analyzing data from different years in order to expand the amount of available data. As the VIIRS–DNB sensor on board the NOAA–20 satellite (launched 2017) has almost the same design, this method can also be extended to the data taken by NOAA–20.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-4073 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2880
Permanent link to this record