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Author Yang, Y.; Liu, Q.; Wang, T.; Pan, J.
Title Light pollution disrupts molecular clock in avian species: A power-calibrated meta-analysis Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Environmental Pollution Abbreviated Journal Environmental Pollution
Volume in press Issue Pages 114206
Keywords Animals
Abstract Nighttime lighting is an increasingly important anthropogenic environmental stress on plants and animals. Exposure to unnatural lighting environments may disrupt circadian rhythm. However, studies involved in molecular biology, e.g. disruption of molecular circadian clock by light pollution, always have a small sample sizes. The small sample sizes result in a low statistical power and difficulties in replicating prior results. Here, a power-calibrated meta-analysis was developed to overcome these weakness. The results demonstrated that effect size of 2.48 in clock genes induced by artificial light would promised the reproducibility of the results as high as 80%. Long wavelength light entrained the positive core clock genes and negative core clock genes with robust circadian rhythmic expression, whereas some of those genes, e.g. cClock, cCry1, cCry2, cPer2, and cPer3, were arrhythmic in short wavelength light. Artificial light entrained the transcriptional-translational feedback loop of molecular clock in a wavelength-dependent manner. The expression positive core clock genes (cBmal1, cBmal2 and cClock), cAanat gene and melatonin were the greatest in short wavelength light and the lowest in long wavelength light. However, for negative regulators of molecular clock (cCry1, cCry2, cPer2 and cPer3), the greatest were in long wavelength light and the lowest were in short wavelength light. Our study opens up new opportunities to understand and strengthen conclusions based on the studies with small sample sizes and provides further insight about the disrupting in circadian rhythm by short wavelength light. Especially, the global lighting is shifting from “yellow” sodium lamps toward blue-enriched “white” light-emitting diodes (LEDs).
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2852
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Author Nanjo, S.; Hozumi, Y.; Hosokawa, K.; Kataoka, R.; Miyoshi, Y.; Oyama, S.‐ichiro; Ozaki, M.; Shiokawa, K.; Kurita, S.
Title Fine‐Scale Visualization of Aurora in a Wide Area Using Color Digital Camera Images From the International Space Station Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Abbreviated Journal J. Geophys. Res. Space Physics
Volume 125 Issue 3 Pages
Keywords natural light; aurora
Abstract The full‐color photographs of aurora have been taken with digital single‐lens reflex cameras mounted on the International Space Station (ISS). Since these photographs do not have accurate time and geographical information, in order to use them as scientific data, it is necessary to calibrate the imaging parameters (such as looking direction and angle of view of the camera) of the photographs. For this purpose, we calibrated the imaging parameters using a city light image taken from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program satellite following the method of Hozumi et al. (2016, https://doi.org/10.1186/s40623-016-0532-z). We mapped the photographs onto the geographic coordinate system using the calibrated imaging parameters. To evaluate the accuracy of the mapping, we compared the aurora taken simultaneously from ISS and ground. Comparing the spatial structure of discrete aurora and the temporal variation of pulsating aurora, the accuracy of the data set is less than 0.3 s in time and less than 5 km in space in the direction perpendicular to the looking direction of the camera. The generated data set has a wide field of view ( urn:x-wiley:jgra:media:jgra55570:jgra55570-math-00011,100  urn:x-wiley:jgra:media:jgra55570:jgra55570-math-0002 900 km), and their temporal resolution is less than 1 s. Not only that, the field of view can sweep a wide area ( urn:x-wiley:jgra:media:jgra55570:jgra55570-math-00033,000 km in longitude) in a short time ( urn:x-wiley:jgra:media:jgra55570:jgra55570-math-000410 min). Thus, this new imaging capability will enable us to capture the evolution of fine‐scale spatial structure of aurora in a wide area.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2169-9380 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2851
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Author Min, M.; Zheng, J.; Zhang, P.; Hu, X.; Chen, L.; Li, X.; Huang, Y.; Zhu, L.
Title A low-light radiative transfer model for satellite observations of moonlight and earth surface light at night Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer
Volume in press Issue Pages 106954
Keywords Remote Sensing; Instrumentation
Abstract Lunar sun-reflected light can be effectively measured through a low-light band or a day/night band (DNB) implemented on space-based optical sensors. Based on moonlight, nocturnal observations for artificial light sources at night can be achieved. However, to date, an open-sourced and mature Low-Light Radiative Transfer Model (LLRTM) for the further understanding of the radiative transfer problem at night is still unavailable. Therefore, this study develops a new LLRTM at night with the correction of the lunar and active surface light sources. First, the radiative transfer equations with an active surface light source are derived for the calculation based on the lunar spectral irradiance (LSI) model. The simulation from this new LLRTM shows a minimal bias when compared with the discrete ordinates radiative transfer (DISORT) model. The simulated results of radiance and reflectance at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) also show that the surface light source has a remarkable impact on the radiative transfer process. In contrast, the change in the lunar phase angle has minimal influence. Also, comparing with space-based DNB radiance observations, LLRTM shows the potential to simulate space-based low-light imager observations under an effective surface light source condition during the night.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-4073 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2850
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Author Sun, Y.; Wang, S.; Wang, Y.
Title Estimating local-scale urban heat island intensity using nighttime light satellite imageries Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Sustainable Cities and Society Abbreviated Journal Sustainable Cities and Society
Volume 57 Issue Pages in press
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Urban heat island (UHI) effect tends to harm health, increase anthropogenic energy consumption, and water consumption. Some policies targeting UHI mitigation have been implemented for a few years and thus needs to be evaluated for changes or modifications in the future. A low-cost approach to rapidly monitoring UHI intensity variations can assist in evaluating policy implementations. In this study, we proposed a new approach to local-scale UHI intensity estimates by using nighttime light satellite imageries. We explored to what extent UHI intensity could be estimated according to nighttime light intensity at two local scales. We attempted to estimate district-level and neighbourhood-level UHI intensity across London and Paris. As the geography level rises from district to neighbourhood, the capacity of the models explaining the variations of the UHI intensity decreases. Although the possible presence of residual spatial autocorrelation in the conventional regression models applied to geospatial data, most of the studies are likely to neglect this issue when fitting data to models. To remove negative effects of the residual spatial autocorrelation, this study used spatial regression models instead of non-spatial regression models (e.g., OLS models) to estimate UHI intensity. As a result, district-level UHI intensity was successfully estimated according to nighttime light intensity (approximately R2 = 0.7, MAE =1.16 °C, and RMSE =1.74 °C).
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2210-6707 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2849
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Author Zheng, H.; Gui, Z.; Wu, H.; Song, A.
Title Developing Non-Negative Spatial Autoregressive Models for Better Exploring Relation Between Nighttime Light Images and Land Use Types Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 12 Issue 5 Pages 798
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Exploring the relationship between nighttime light and land use is of great significance to understanding human nighttime activities and studying socioeconomic phenomena. Models have been studied to explain the relationships, but the existing studies seldom consider the spatial autocorrelation of night light data, which leads to large regression residuals and an inaccurate regression correlation between night light and land use. In this paper, two non-negative spatial autoregressive models are proposed for the spatial lag model and spatial error model, respectively, which use a spatial adjacency matrix to calculate the spatial autocorrelation effect of light in adjacent pixels on the central pixel. The application scenarios of the two models were analyzed, and the contribution of various land use types to nighttime light in different study areas are further discussed. Experiments in Berlin, Massachusetts and Shenzhen showed that the proposed methods have better correlations with the reference data compared with the non-negative least-squares method, better reflecting the luminous situation of different land use types at night. Furthermore, the proposed model and the obtained relationship between nighttime light and land use types can be utilized for other applications of nighttime light images in the population, GDP and carbon emissions for better exploring the relationship between nighttime remote sensing brightness and socioeconomic activities.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2848
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