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Author Linares, H.; Masana, E.; Ribas, S.J.; Aubé, M.; Simoneau, A.; Bará, S.
Title Night sky brightness simulation over Montsec protected area Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer
Volume 249 Issue Pages 106990
Keywords Skyglow
Abstract Night sky brightness over Montsec Observatory (north-east of Spain) has been computed and checked against measurements using Illumina numerical model [2]. In a previous publication [20] the methodology was validated and light pollution received in the observatory coming from a unique city was computed. Here we present a simulation that includes all the sources that has a significant impact over the quality of the night sky in this area. The decision of which sources should be included in the simulations was taken following the methodology explained by [6]: using a point spread function (PSF) as a simple approach to estimate which sources are brightening the sky dome over the observer. An ad hoc PSF derived with Illumina was used with the purpose of avoiding to have to rely on already existing empirical PSF. The resulting PSF can be used in any location with similar atmospheric conditions. Differences in the spectrum of the lamps can be accounted easily by adjusting a spectrum scale factor. Illumina simulates the artificial sky brightness received (W/sr/m2) by an observer from any direction. Adding the natural sky brightness allows to compare the simulations to measurements taken with different instrumentation. In our case simulations were checked against ASTMON, SQC and SQM measurements. They show a good agreement both in absolute values and in geographical patterns for the three filters studied, B, V and R. The methodology presented opens many possibilities, such as increasing the reliability of the maps that point out the light pollution main contributors for any location, and reducing the amount of time needed to perform an accurate simulation of the night sky brightness.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-4073 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2923
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Author Yue, Y.; Tian, L.; Yue, Q.; Wang, Z.
Title Spatiotemporal Variations in Energy Consumption and Their Influencing Factors in China Based on the Integration of the DMSP-OLS and NPP-VIIRS Nighttime Light Datasets Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 12 Issue 7 Pages 1151
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract With the speedy growth of economic development, the imbalance of energy supply and demand pose a critical challenge for the energy security of our country. Meanwhile, the increasing and excessive energy consumption lead to the greenhouse effect and atmospheric pollution, greatly threatening the survival and development of human beings. This study integrated two nighttime light remote sensing datasets, namely Defense Meteorological Satellite Program’s Operational Linescan System (DMSP-OLS) data and Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) data, to extend the temporal coverage of the study. Then, the distributions of China’s energy consumption from 1995 to 2016 at a 1-km resolution were estimated using different models and the spatiotemporal variations of energy consumption were explored on the basis of the best estimated results. Next, the factors influencing China’s energy intensity on the provincial level were investigated based on the spatial econometric model. The results show that: (1) The integrated nighttime light datasets can be successfully applied to estimate the dynamic changes of energy consumption. Moreover, the panel data model established in our research performed better than the quadratic polynomial model. (2) During the observation period, the energy consumption in China significantly increased, especially in the Yangtze River Delta, the Pearl River Delta, the Beijing–Tianjin–Hebei region, eastern coastal cities, and provincial capitals. (3) Different from the random spatial distribution pattern of energy consumption on the provincial level, the spatial distribution of energy consumption on the prefectural level has significant clusters, and its spatial agglomeration was strengthened year by year during the research period. (4) The spatial Durbin model (SDM) with a spatial fixed effect has been proved to be more suitable to explore the impact mechanism of China’s energy consumption. Among the four socio-economic factors, industrial structure has the greatest impact on the provincial energy intensity in China. Moreover, the changes in industrial structure and foreign direct investment (FDI) can not only influence the local energy intensity but also affect the energy intensity of the neighboring provinces.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2922
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Author Sun, B.; Zhang, Y.; Zhou, Q.; Gao, D.
Title Street-Scale Analysis of Population Exposure to Light Pollution Based on Remote Sensing and Mobile Big Data-Shenzhen City as a Case Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Sensors (Basel, Switzerland) Abbreviated Journal Sensors (Basel)
Volume 20 Issue 9 Pages
Keywords Remote Sensing; Luojia 1-01; NTL remote sensing; light pollution; population exposure to light pollution; residential area
Abstract Most studies on light pollution are based on light intensity retrieved from nighttime light (NTL) remote sensing with less consideration of the population factors. Furthermore, the coarse spatial resolution of traditional NTL remote sensing data limits the refined applications in current smart city studies. In order to analyze the influence of light pollution on populated areas, this study proposes an index named population exposure to light pollution (PELP) and conducts a street-scale analysis to illustrate spatial variation of PELP among residential areas in cites. By taking Shenzhen city as a case, multi-source data were combined including high resolution NTL remote sensing data from the Luojia 1-01 satellite sensor, high-precision mobile big data for visualizing human activities and population distribution as well as point of interest (POI) data. Results show that the main influenced areas of light pollution are concentrated in the downtown and core areas of newly expanded areas with obvious deviation corrected like traditional serious light polluted regions (e.g., ports). In comparison, commercial-residential mixed areas and village-in-city show a high level of PELP. The proposed method better presents the extent of population exposure to light pollution at a fine-grid scale and the regional difference between different types of residential areas in a city.
Address TalkingData Co., Ltd., Beijing 100027, China
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1424-8220 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32403250 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2921
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Author Cox, D.T.C.; Sánchez de Miguel, A.; Dzurjak, S.A.; Bennie, J.; Gaston, K.J.
Title National Scale Spatial Variation in Artificial Light at Night Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 12 Issue 10 Pages 1591
Keywords Remote Sensing; United Kingdom; National parks; skyglow; VIIRS-DNB; albedo; landcover; light emissions; light pollution; protected areas; skyglow; sky brightness; urbanization
Abstract The disruption to natural light regimes caused by outdoor artificial nighttime lighting has significant impacts on human health and the natural world. Artificial light at night takes two forms, light emissions and skyglow (caused by the scattering of light by water, dust and gas molecules in the atmosphere). Key to determining where the biological impacts from each form are likely to be experienced is understanding their spatial occurrence, and how this varies with other landscape factors. To examine this, we used data from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) day/night band and the World Atlas of Artificial Night Sky Brightness, to determine covariation in (a) light emissions, and (b) skyglow, with human population density, landcover, protected areas and roads in Britain. We demonstrate that, although artificial light at night increases with human density, the amount of light per person decreases with increasing urbanization (with per capita median direct emissions three times greater in rural than urban populations, and per capita median skyglow eleven times greater). There was significant variation in artificial light at night within different landcover types, emphasizing that light pollution is not a solely urban issue. Further, half of English National Parks have higher levels of skyglow than light emissions, indicating their failure to buffer biodiversity from pressures that artificial lighting poses. The higher per capita emissions in rural than urban areas provide different challenges and opportunities for mitigating the negative human health and environmental impacts of light pollution.
Address Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn, Cornwall TR10 9FE, UK; d.t.c.cox(at )exeter.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher MDPI Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 2920
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Author Maroni, M.J.; Capri, K.M.; Arruda, N.L.; Gelineau, R.R.; Deane, H.V.; Concepcion, H.A.; DeCourcey, H.; Monteiro De Pina, I.K.; Cushman, A.V.; Chasse, M.H.; Logan, R.W.; Seggio, J.A.
Title Substrain specific behavioral responses in male C57BL/6N and C57BL/6J mice to a shortened 21-hour day and high-fat diet Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Animals; Mouse; circadian; high-fat diet; locomotor activity; photoperiod; strain differences
Abstract Altered circadian rhythms have negative consequences on health and behavior. Emerging evidence suggests genetics influences the physiological and behavioral responses to circadian disruption. We investigated the effects of a 21 h day (T = 21 cycle), with high-fat diet consumption, on locomotor activity, explorative behaviors, and health in male C57BL/6J and C57BL/6N mice. Mice were exposed to either a T = 24 or T = 21 cycle and given standard rodent chow (RC) or a 60% high-fat diet (HFD) followed by behavioral assays and physiological measures. We uncovered numerous strain differences within the behavioral and physiological assays, mainly that C57BL/6J mice exhibit reduced susceptibility to the obesogenic effects of (HFD) and anxiety-like behavior as well as increased circadian and novelty-induced locomotor activity compared to C57BL/6N mice. There were also substrain-specific differences in behavioral responses to the T = 21 cycle, including exploratory behaviors and circadian locomotor activity. Under the 21-h day, mice consuming RC displayed entrainment, while mice exposed to HFD exhibited a lengthening of activity rhythms. In the open-field and light-dark box, mice exposed to the T = 21 cycle had increased novelty-induced locomotor activity with no further effects of diet, suggesting daylength may affect mood-related behaviors. These results indicate that different circadian cycles impact metabolic and behavioral responses depending on genetic background, and despite circadian entrainment.
Address Department of Biological Sciences, Bridgewater State University, Bridgewater, Massachusetts, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32400203 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2919
Permanent link to this record