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Author Stathakis, D.; Liakos, L.
Title Median Shift Lunar Correction for VIIRS Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages in press
Keywords Moonlight; Remote Sensing
Abstract Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) 24-h data are substantially affected by lunar illumination. A new method is proposed to correct this distortion and be able to form a consistent time series. The method has the advantage of being relatively simple in its deployment while at the same time effective. The results show that the proposed method removes periodical illumination noise due to the lunar circle while preserving meaningful information, in the test sites applied.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1558-0571 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial (down) 3228
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Author Cui, Y.; Shi, K.; Jiang, L.; Qiu, L.; Wu, S
Title Identifying and Evaluating the Nighttime Economy in China Using Multisource Data Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages inp ress
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract The nighttime economy has always been regarded as an important part of the economy. Monitoring and evaluating the nighttime economic level is of great significance for promoting consumption and economic growth and optimizing industrial structure. However, it is difficult to evaluate the nighttime economy in China due to the data being unavailable. Hence, the objective of this study is to identify and evaluate the nighttime economy in China from different perspectives. First, a comprehensive nighttime economic index (CNEI) was constructed by integrating the nighttime light intensity and the points of interest data to represent the nighttime economic level. The CNEI was then verified using the business report data and socioeconomic statistical data. The results show that the CNEI is highly correlated with the verified data. We also found that Shanghai, Chengdu, Guangzhou, and Shenzhen have the highest CNEI values, and the CNEI values of southern cities are generally higher than those of northern cities. This is mainly because the differences in the lifestyles, climatic factors, and cultural customs in the north and south determine the nighttime economic activities. Counties with very high CNEI values are mostly located in the capital cities of each province. The spatial agglomeration at the county level performed more strongly than that at the prefecture level. The study will not only help better understand the nighttime economic level on different scales but also contribute to city-level policymaking on urban planning and economic development.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial (down) 3227
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Author Kretzer, D. M.; Walczak, M.
Title The Impact of Vertical Densification on Public Lighting in Informal Settlements: Using Virtual Environments as an Evaluation Tool for Policy Making Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Athens Journal of Architecture Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages in press
Keywords Lighting
Abstract There are a variety of reasons to support the premise that public lighting is beneficial to urban communities. At the same time, a key challenge for the provision of public lighting in informal settlements is their constant physical transformation. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the application of virtual environments (VEs) in lighting planning and policy making. Despite the fact that VEs offer the opportunity to explore an environment by freely navigating through it, including environments that change over time, this feature is rarely taken into account in decision-making processes. A VE-based analysis tool for informal settlement lighting is presented using a case-study street in the informal settlement of Caracolí in Bogotá as its basis. The main data set for the VE scenarios was comprised of results from a household survey, spatial measurements, and participant observations as well as luminous intensity distribution curves. The household survey was used to collect time-related data on the incremental construction of Caracoli's informal dwellings, which was then projected into past, present, and future night-time scenarios. The lighting quality of these different scenarios was systematically evaluated via lighting calculation software, revealing a variety of shortcomings caused by the current lighting approach. Based on these findings, an alternative lighting approach was developed and re-examined using lighting calculations. Finally, custom game-engine technology and GPU computing were deployed, which allowed for real-time visualisation of the different lighting scenarios and their lighting quality. This setup therefore enables fast iterative feedback loops for current and future lighting policy scenarios and the resulting lighting design. In the first instance, a VE can illustrate well how current lighting policy results in a significant delay of lighting provision in the early stage of a settlement as well as highlight the mismatch between lighting technology and the built environment during the vertical densification phases. Second, the VE is able to showcase alternative lighting technologies and policy approaches as well as the resulting lighting effects, enabling a visual comparison of different policy scenarios over several decades. In conclusion it will be argued that the dynamic VE technology appears to be a promising decision-making tool for illustrating potential planning and design shortcomings to policy stakeholders in a manner understandable to the layman.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial (down) 3226
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Author Niu, W.; Xia, H.; Wang, R.; Pan, L.; Meng, Q.; Qin, Y.; Li, R.; Zhao, X.; Bian, X.; Zhao, W.
Title Research on Large-Scale Urban Shrinkage and Expansion in the Yellow River Affected Area Using Night Light Data Type Journal Article
Year 2021 Publication ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information Abbreviated Journal Ijgi
Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 5
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract As the land use issue, caused by urban shrinkage in China, is becoming more and more prominent, research on urban shrinkage and expansion has become particularly challenging and urgent. Based on the points of interest (POI) data, this paper redefines the scope, quantity, and area of natural cities by using threshold methods, which accurately identify the shrinkage and expansion of cities in the Yellow River affected area using night light data in 2013 and 2018. The results show that: (1) there are 3130 natural cities (48,118.75 km2) in the Yellow River affected area, including 604 shrinking cities (8407.50 km2) and 2165 expanding cities (32,972.75 km2). (2) The spatial distributions of shrinking and expanding cities are quite different. The shrinking cities are mainly located in the upper Yellow River affected area, except for the administrative cities of Lanzhou and Yinchuan; the expanding cities are mainly distributed in the middle and lower Yellow River affected area, and the administrative cities of Lanzhou and Yinchuan. (3) Shrinking and expanding cities are typically smaller cities. The research results provide a quick data supported approach for regional urban planning and land use management, for when regional and central governments formulate the outlines of urban development monitoring and regional planning.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2220-9964 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3225
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Author Peng, J.; Liu, Q.; Blaschke, T.; Zhang, Z.; Liu, Y.; Hu, Y.’na; Wang, M.; Xu, Z.; Wu, J.
Title Integrating land development size, pattern, and density to identify urban–rural fringe in a metropolitan region Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Landscape Ecology Abbreviated Journal Landscape Ecol
Volume 35 Issue 9 Pages 2045-2059
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Context

Located between urban area and rural area, urban–rural fringe is challenged with urbanization related social-ecological problems. Accurately identifying the urban–rural fringe can help to integrated urban–rural development planning, especially in metropolitan region. Among the various case studies to identify the urban–rural fringe, land use degree and impervious surface area are widely used. However, both indexes are only focused on land development size, resulting in coarse identifying results.

Objectives

It is aimed to propose a three-dimensional approach to integrating land development size, pattern and density, in order to accurately identifying the urban–rural fringe.

Methods

Landsat TM and DMSP/OLS datasets were used to establish a three-dimensional index system consisting of land development size (LDS), land development pattern (LDP) and land development density (LDD). Self-Organizing Feature Map (SOFM) was applied to identify the urban–rural fringe of Beijing City, China.

Results

From 2001 to 2009, the inner boundary of the urban–rural fringe had expanded to outside the fifth ring road. Likewise, the outer boundary moved from the fifth to the sixth ring road. The new urban development zone was the main area of urban expansion controlled by urban planning, where the increments of urban–rural fringe was 1273.5 km2, accounting for 75.24% of the whole city. Partial correlation analysis indicated that LDS played a leading role in SOFM clustering, but the spatial continuity of the urban–rural fringe was the best when it was integrated with LDP and LDD, especially the latter to comprehensively define and quantify land development intensity.

Conclusions

The integration of land development size, pattern and density is effective to quantify land development intensity, and thus to identify the urban–rural fringe in metropolitan regions.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0921-2973 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial (down) 3224
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