|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Barrette, T.P.; Pike, A.M.
Title Closed-Course Human Factors Evaluation of Marking and Marker Visibility Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board Abbreviated Journal Transportation Research Record
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Vision
Abstract Raised retroreflective pavement markers (RRPMs) are commonly used to provide nighttime delineation of roadways. Although RRPMs are visible during dry conditions, they provide their greatest benefit during wet-night conditions, when typical pavement markings become flooded and lose their retroreflectivite properties. Naturally, the retroreflectivity of RRPMs degrades over time as a result of traffic, ultraviolet light, precipitation, and roadway maintenance activities. Subsequently, it is necessary to examine the relationship between driver performance and the condition of the RRPMs. To assess visibility relative to RRPM condition, study participants rode in the passenger seat of a vehicle operated by a member of the research team, traveling at approximately 15 mph, for two laps around a closed course. Throughout each lap of the course, nine treatments consisting of RRPMs or preformed pavement marking tape of various retroreflectivity levels diverged from a center line to either the right or left. Participants indicated when they could tell which direction the treatment diverged, which was recorded using a GPS unit. A generalized linear model was estimated on a dataset constructed by pairing the observed distances from various treatments with demographic information about each participant. The analysis indicates the distance at which a particular treatment would be visible, which can then be converted to preview time to assess treatment adequacy for a variety of speeds. The RRPM treatments generally provided adequate preview time for older drivers based on the extant literature; however, the preformed pavement marking tape was less adequate at higher speeds and under overhead lighting.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0361-1981 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2499
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Barentine, J.C.
Title Methods for Assessment and Monitoring of Light Pollution around Ecologically Sensitive Sites Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Imaging Abbreviated Journal J. Imaging
Volume 5 Issue 5 Pages 54
Keywords Review; Instrumentation; Skyglow; Remote Sensing
Abstract Since the introduction of electric lighting over a century ago, and particularly in the decades following the Second World War, indications of artificial light on the nighttime Earth as seen from Earth orbit have increased at a rate exceeding that of world population growth during the same period. Modification of the natural photic environment at night is a clear and imminent consequence of the proliferation of anthropogenic light at night into outdoor spaces, and with this unprecedented change comes a host of known and suspected ecological consequences. In the past two decades, the conservation community has gradually come to view light pollution as a threat requiring the development of best management practices. Establishing those practices demands a means of quantifying the problem, identifying polluting sources, and monitoring the evolution of their impacts through time. The proliferation of solid-state lighting and the changes to source spectral power distribution it has brought relative to legacy lighting technologies add the complication of color to the overall situation. In this paper, I describe the challenge of quantifying light pollution threats to ecologically-sensitive sites in the context of efforts to conserve natural nighttime darkness, assess the current state of the art in detection and imaging technology as applied to this realm, review some recent innovations, and consider future prospects for imaging approaches to provide substantial support for darkness conservation initiatives around the world.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2313-433X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2498
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Mpakairi, K.S.; Muvengwi, J.
Title Night-time lights and their influence on summer night land surface temperature in two urban cities of Zimbabwe: A geospatial perspective Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Urban Climate Abbreviated Journal Urban Climate
Volume 29 Issue Pages 100468
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Owing to the developments that exist in urban landscapes, urban areas experience climates that are different from their surroundings even when in the same climatic region. This is a prominent phenomenon in most urban areas and is commonly known as Surface Urban Heat Island (SUHI). An understanding of some of the drivers of SUHI is imperative for cities worldwide if they endeavor to suppress the socio-economic mishaps related to extremely high UHI. In this study, we sought to explain the drivers of SUHI in two developing cities in Zimbabwe using remote sensing data. We do this through the use of a classification and regression model. The model used climate, land descriptors and anthropogenic activity data as predictor variables against summer night land surface temperature. Using the coefficient of determination (R2) and the root mean square error (RMSE) for evaluation, modelled SUHI was strongly related to actual SUHI. We also found out that night-time lights, a proxy of anthropogenic activity, contributed more to summer night surface urban heat island as compared to other variables used in the study. This study adds more knowledge on the likely drivers of UHI for southern African cities. By identifying SUHI drivers in urban cities, it is plausible to formulate policies or initiatives that regulate extreme summer night SUHI.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2212-0955 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2497
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wilson, P.; Thums, M.; Pattiaratchi, C.; Whiting, S.; Pendoley, K.; Ferreira, L.C.; Meekan, M.
Title High predation of marine turtle hatchlings near a coastal jetty Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal Biological Conservation
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Animals
Abstract Growing human populations are driving the development of coastal infrastructure such as port facilities. Here, we used passive acoustic telemetry to examine the effects of a jetty and artificial light on the rates of predation of flatback turtle (Natator depressus) hatchlings as they disperse through nearshore waters. When released near a jetty, around 70% of the tagged hatchlings were predated before they could transit the nearshore, irrespective of the presence or absence of artificial light. Only 3 to 23% of hatchlings encountered predators at a second study site nearby where there was no jetty and a similar amount of nesting activity. Evidence for predation was provided by rapid tag detachment due to prey handling by a predator or the extensive movement of the tags within the receiver array suggesting that the tag (and hatchling) was inside the stomach of a predator. We found that 70% of the fish predators that consumed tags used the jetty as a refuge during the day and expanded their range along nearshore waters at night, predating on hatchlings in areas adjacent to the jetty with the highest nesting density. Sampling of potential predators including lutjanid reef fishes under the jetty revealed the presence of turtle hatchlings in their gut contents. By providing daytime refuges for predators, nearshore structures such as jetties have the potential to concentrate predators and they may pose a significant threat to populations of vulnerable species. Such effects must be taken into consideration when assessing the environmental impacts associated with these structures.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2496
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chen, X.; Nordhaus, W.D.
Title VIIRS Nighttime Lights in the Estimation of Cross-Sectional and Time-Series GDP Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 11 Issue 9 Pages 1057
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract This study extends previous applications of DMSP OLS nighttime lights data to examine the usefulness of newer VIIRS lights in the estimation of economic activity. Focusing on both US states and metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs), we found that the VIIRS lights are more useful in predicting cross-sectional GDP than predicting time-series GDP data. This result is similar to previous findings for DMSP OLS nighttime lights. Additionally, the present analysis shows that high-resolution VIIRS lights provide a better prediction for MSA GDP than for state GDP, which suggests that lights may be more closely related to urban sectors than rural sectors. The results also indicate the importance of considering biases that may arise from different aggregations (the modifiable areal unit problems, MAUP) in applications of nighttime lights in understanding socioeconomic phenomenon.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2495
Permanent link to this record