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Author Bhukya, K. A., Ramasubbareddy, S., Govinda, K., & Srinivas, T. A. S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Adaptive Mechanism for Smart Street Lighting System Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Smart Intelligent Computing and Applications Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 160 Issue Pages 69-76  
  Keywords Lighting  
  Abstract The adaptive street light has the ability to adapt to the motion of cycles, cars and pedestrians. It uses motion as well as light sensors to detect the traffic and light around. It dims when there is no movement on the road, and is brightened when there is any activity. Smart street lights are very dissimilar from the old methods of lighting. It is an automated system that will be able to automate the streets. The main objective of these lights is to decrease the utilization of power, while no activity is detected on the street. It will be switched ON while there are pedestrians and cars on the street or else they will get dimmed to 20% of the brightness. The proposed approach gives a method to conserve power by using the PIR sensors to sense the incoming traffic and hence turning ON a cluster of lights surrounding the traffic. As the traffic is passing by, the street lights left behind will dim on its own. Hence, a lot of power can be conserved. Also, during the day time when there is no need of light the LDR sensor will sense the light and the light will remain switched OFF. This smart street light system comes under the domain of smart city.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial (down) 2723  
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Author Pritchard, S.B. url  openurl
  Title Epilogue. Field notes from the end of the world: Light, darkness, Energy, and endscape in polar night Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Journal of Energy History Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 2 Issue Pages  
  Keywords Darkness; Lighting; Society; Psychology  
  Abstract This personal essay describes light(s) and darkness(es) in Longyearbyen, Svalbard (Norway) during polar night in January 2019. Drawing on autoethnographic methods, I also seek to describe how I experienced the remarkable lightscapes and darkscapes of the far north during winter. I suggest how the history of energy in Longyearbyen has both shaped and been shaped by the “extreme” light/dark cycle of the high Arctic. In the process, I develop the concept of “endscape” to characterize vestiges of a landscape that has been, and will continue to be, transformed by global climate change, and will eventually disappear. This recent experience illustrates the potential of experiential, reflexive ways of contending with light/dark. It also draws attention to tensions in the academic study of light/dark and the history of energy, and how they play out in practice, in the context of a conference held in a remote location that requires scholars to contribute to the continued extraction of fossil fuels –something that most would otherwise decry. I suggest that Longyearbyen is a useful case study for other endscapes in the early 21st C.  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial (down) 2722  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Debbich, M. url  openurl
  Title Assessing Oil and Non-Oil GDP Growth from Space: An Application to Yemen 2012-17 Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication International Monetary Fund Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 19 Issue 221 Pages  
  Keywords Economics; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract This paper uses an untapped source of satellite-recorded nightlights and gas flaring data to characterize the contraction of economic activity in Yemen throughout the ongoing conflict that erupted in 2015. Using estimated nightlights elasticities on a sample of 72 countries for real GDP and 28 countries for oil GDP over 6 years, I derive oil and non-oil GDP growth for Yemen. I show that real GDP contracted by a cumulative 24 percent over 2015-17 against 50 percent according to official figures. I also find that the impact of the conflict has been geographically uneven with economic activity contracting more in some governorates than in others.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial (down) 2721  
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Author Lee, B., Lee, Y., Kim, D., & Kim, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Correction of Lunar Irradiation Effect and Change Detection Using Suomi-NPP Data Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Korean Journal of Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 35 Issue 2 Pages 265-278  
  Keywords Instrumentation  
  Abstract Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Day/Night Band (DNB) data help to enable rapid emergency responses through detection of the artificial and natural disasters occurring at night. The DNB data without correction of lunar irradiance effect distributed by Korea Ocean Science Center (KOSC) has advantage for rapid change detection because of direct receiving. In this study, radiance differences according to the phase of the moon was analyzed for urban and mountain areas in Korean Peninsula using the DNB data directly receiving to KOSC. Lunar irradiance correction algorithm was proposed for the change detection. Relative correction was performed by regression analysis between the selected pixels considering the land cover classification in the reference DNB image during the new moon and the input DNB image. As a result of daily difference image analysis, the brightness value change in urban area and mountain area was

±

30

radiance and below

±

1

radiance respectively. The object based change detection was performed after the extraction of the main object of interest based on the average image of time series data in order to reduce the matching and geometric error between DNB images. The changes in brightness occurring in mountainous areas were effectively detected after the calibration of lunar irradiance effect, and it showed that the developed technology could be used for real time change detection.
 
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial (down) 2720  
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Author Briggs, R. C. url  openurl
  Title Why does aid not target the poorest? Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication AIDDATA Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Foreign aid projects typically have local effects, so if they are to reduce poverty then they need to be placed close to the poor. I show that, conditional on local population, World Bank (WB) project aid targets richer parts of countries. This relationship holds over time and across world regions. I test five explanations for pro-rich targeting using a pre-registered conjoint experiment on WB task team leaders (TTLs). TTLs perceive aid-receiving governments as most interested in targeting aid politically and controlling implementation. They also believe that aid works better in poorer or more remote areas, but that implementation in these areas is uniquely difficult. These results speak to debates in distributive politics, international bargaining over aid, and principal-agent issues in international organizations. The results also suggest that tweaks to WB incentive structures to make ease of project implementation less important may encourage aid to flow to poorer parts of countries.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial (down) 2719  
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