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Author Obayashi, K.; Yamagami, Y.; Tatsumi, S.; Kurumatani, N.; Saeki, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Indoor light pollution and progression of carotid atherosclerosis: A longitudinal study of the HEIJO-KYO cohort Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Environment International Abbreviated Journal Environment International  
  Volume 133 Issue Pages 105184  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Exposure to light at inappropriate times in relation to the solar cycle can disturb circadian endocrine and metabolic rhythms. Previous studies have suggested an association between light exposure at night (LAN) and obesity, an important risk factor of atherosclerosis, although it remains unclear whether LAN associates with progression of atherosclerosis. To evaluate the longitudinal association between bedroom LAN intensity and progression of carotid atherosclerosis, light intensity in the bedroom at baseline and carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) at baseline and follow-up were measured in 989 elderly participants (945 at baseline and 780 at a median follow-up time of 34 months). The mean age of the participants was 71.4 ± 6.9 years. The average mean and maximal carotid IMT at baseline were 0.88 ± 0.15 and 1.10 ± 0.32 mm, respectively. The median intensity of bedroom LAN was 0.68 lx (IQR, 0.07–3.29). In multivariable analysis adjusted for potential confounders, the highest LAN group exhibited a significant increase in mean carotid IMT (adjusted β, 0.028; 95% CI, 0.005–0.052; P = 0.019) compared with the lowest LAN quartile group. A similar relationship was found between LAN and maximal carotid IMT (adjusted β, 0.083; 95% CI, 0.037–0.129; P < 0.001).

In conclusion, we found a clear and significant association between bedroom LAN intensity and progression of subclinical carotid atherosclerosis, which was independent of known risk factors for atherosclerosis, including age, obesity, smoking, economic status, hypertension, and diabetes. Indoor light pollution may be a potential risk factor for atherosclerosis in the general population.
 
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0160-4120 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2706  
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Author Nankoo, S.; Raymond, S.; Galvez-Cloutier, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The impact of the Jacques Cartier bridge illumination on the food chain: from insects to predators Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Community Ecology Abbreviated Journal Community Ecology  
  Volume 20 Issue 2 Pages 172-180  
  Keywords Animals; Ecology  
  Abstract Artificial light at night can impact numerous diurnal species by influencing their distribution and habits. In this study, artificial lights placed on the Jacques Cartier bridge in Montreal, Canada were evaluated to determine their impact on insects, insectivorous birds and peregrine falcons. The impact was measured the year the illumination begun and the year following (two years in total). Insect distribution and abundance at three different sites around the bridge was measured. Insectivorous bird abundance and activity were evaluated by observing the cliff swallow as a proxy. Peregrine falcon presence and nesting behavior at the bridge was measured. Insects (aerial and aquatic) were found to be more abundant closer to the illuminated part of the bridge and particularly in the year following the illumination's beginning. Similarly, cliff swallows were more abundant at the bridge the year following the start of the illumination and their activity was more important closer to the illuminated section. Peregrine falcons were only present at the bridge in the year following the beginning of the illumination and specifically at the illuminated part of the bridge. No nesting was detected. These three groups are connected to each other through a food chain in which insect abundance impacts insectivorous bird abundance, which in turn impacts peregrine falcon presence. The illumination therefore positively impacts these three groups separately and together through their food chain. This research highlights the importance of monitoring bird and insect population close to the bridge and further continuation of these observations are necessary to determine if the observed tendency will continue to develop throughout the years.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1585-8553 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2705  
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Author Kocifaj, M.; Bará, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Two-index model for characterizing site-specific night sky brightness patterns Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 490 Issue 2 Pages 1953-1960  
  Keywords Skyglow  
  Abstract The determination of the all-sky radiance distribution produced by artificial light sources is a computationally demanding task that generally requires intensive calculations. In this paper, we develop an analytical formulation that provides the all-sky radiance distribution produced by an artificial light source as an explicit and analytical function of the observation direction, depending on two single parameters that characterize the overall effects of the atmosphere. One of these parameters is related to the effective attenuation of the light beams, whereas the other accounts for the overall asymmetry of the combined scattering processes in molecules and aerosols. Using this formulation, a wide range of all-sky radiance distributions can be efficiently and accurately calculated in a short time. This substantial reduction in the number of required parameters, in comparison with other approaches that are currently used, is expected to facilitate the development of new applications in the field of light pollution research.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0035-8711 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2704  
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Author Houpt, K.A.; Erb, H.N.; Coria-Avila, G.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Sleep of Shelter Dogs Was Not Disrupted by Overnight Light Rather than Darkness in a Crossover Trial Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Animals : an Open Access Journal From MDPI Abbreviated Journal Animals (Basel)  
  Volume 9 Issue 10 Pages 794  
  Keywords Animals; dog; influence of light; night-time behavior; shelter; sleep  
  Abstract Dogs in shelters may be unattended at night. The purpose of this study is to describe the night-time behavior of dogs in a shelter and to determine if artificial light affected their sleeping patterns. Ten dogs were video-recorded under both light and dark conditions and their behavior recorded using focal animal sampling. The dogs were lying down 649 +/- 40 min (mean +/- SD) in the light condition and 629 +/- 58 min in the dark condition each night. They awoke, stood up, turned around and then lay down again every 48 to 50 min. There was no significant difference in time spent lying between the two conditions (p > 0.05). Light did not seem to affect their behavior. The conclusion is that dogs in shelters may sleep in the absence of people and that light does not disrupt their sleep patterns.  
  Address Centro de Investigaciones Cerebrales, Universidad Veracruzana, Xalapa-Enriquez 91090, Mexico. gcoria@uv.mx  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2076-2615 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31615005 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2703  
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Author Xiao, Q.; Gee, G.; Jones, R.R.; Jia, P.; James, P.; Hale, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Cross-sectional association between outdoor artificial light at night and sleep duration in middle-to-older aged adults: The NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Environmental Research Abbreviated Journal Environ Res  
  Volume 180 Issue Pages 108823  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Human Health; Artificial light at night; Circadian disruption; Neighborhood; Sleep; Socioeconomic disadvantage  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION: Artificial light at night (ALAN) can disrupt circadian rhythms and cause sleep disturbances. Several previous epidemiological studies have reported an association between higher levels of outdoor ALAN and shorter sleep duration. However, it remains unclear how this association may differ by individual- and neighborhood-level socioeconomic status, and whether ALAN may also be associated with longer sleep duration. METHODS: We assessed the cross-sectional relationship between outdoor ALAN and self-reported sleep duration in 333,365 middle- to older-aged men and women in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. Study participants reported baseline addresses, which were geocoded and linked with outdoor ALAN exposure measured by satellite imagery data obtained from the U.S. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's Operational Linescan System. We used multinomial logistic regression to estimate the multinomial odds ratio (MOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the likelihood of reporting very short (<5h), short (<7h) and long (>/=9h) sleep relative to reporting 7-8h of sleep across quintiles of LAN. We also conducted subgroup analyses by individual-level education and census tract-level poverty levels. RESULTS: We found that higher levels of ALAN were associated with both very short and short sleep. When compared to the lowest quintile, the highest quintile of ALAN was associated with 16% and 25% increases in the likelihood of reporting short sleep in women (MORQ1 vs Q5, (95% CI), 1.16 (1.10, 1.22)) and men (1.25 (1.19, 1.31)), respectively. Moreover, we found that higher ALAN was associated with a decrease in the likelihood of reporting long sleep in men (0.79 (0.71, 0.89)). We also found that the associations between ALAN and short sleep were larger in neighborhoods with higher levels of poverty. CONCLUSIONS: The burden of short sleep may be higher among residents in areas with higher levels of outdoor LAN, and this association is likely stronger in poorer neighborhoods. Future studies should investigate the potential benefits of reducing light intensity in high ALAN areas in improve sleep health.  
  Address Program in Public Health, Department of Family, Population, and Preventive Medicine, Stony Brook Medicine, Stony Brook, NY, USA  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0013-9351 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31627155 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2702  
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