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Author Bos, A.R.; Gumanao, G.S.
Title The lunar cycle determines availability of coral-reef fishes at fish markets Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Journal of Fish Biology Abbreviated Journal J Fish Biol
Volume 81 Issue 6 Pages 2074-2079
Keywords Animals; Commerce; Coral Reefs; *Fishes; *Moon; Philippines; Seafood/*statistics & numerical data
Abstract During 139 visits between March 2009 and May 2011, it was found that the availability of reef fishes at a local fish market in the Philippines was highly affected by the lunar cycle. The number of vendors selling reef fishes was significantly lower (13.4%) during third lunar quarters (full moon periods) than during the first, second and fourth lunar quarters (40.2, 25.0 and 30.0%, respectively). It is recommended that the influence of the lunar cycle on fish availability is considered when designing sampling strategies for catch surveys.
Address Netherlands Centre for Biodiversity Naturalis, RA Leiden, The Netherlands. arthurrbos@yahoo.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-1112 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23130702 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (up) 65
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Author Mehner, T.
Title Diel vertical migration of freshwater fishes – proximate triggers, ultimate causes and research perspectives: Diel vertical migration in freshwater fishes Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Freshwater Biology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 57 Issue 7 Pages 1342-1359
Keywords diel vertical migration; *Fishes; freshwater fish
Abstract 1. Diel vertical migrations (DVM) are typical for many cold-water fish species such as Pacific salmons (Oncorhynchus spp.) and coregonids (Coregonus spp.) inhabiting deep lakes. A comprehensive recent overview of DVM in freshwater fish has not been available, however.

2. The main proximate trigger of DVM in freshwater fish is the diel change in light intensity, with declining illumination at dusk triggering the ascent and the increase at dawn triggering the descent. Additional proximate cues are hydrostatic pressure and water temperature, which may guide fish into particular water layers at night.

3. Ultimate causes of DVM encompass bioenergetics efficiency, feeding opportunities and predator avoidance. None of these factors alone can explain the DVM in all cases. Multi-factorial hypotheses, such as the ‘antipredation window’ combined with the thermal niche hypothesis, are more likely to explain DVM. It is suggested that planktivorous fish move within a layer sufficiently well illuminated to capture zooplankton, but too dark for predators to feed upon the migrating fish. In complete darkness, fish seek layers with a temperature that optimises bioenergetics efficiency. The strength of each factor may differ from lake to lake, and hence system-specific individual analyses are needed.

4. Mechanistic details that are still poorly explored are the costs of buoyancy regulation and migration, the critical light thresholds for feeding of planktivorous and piscivorous fish, and predator assessment by (and size-dependent predation risk of) the prey fish.

5. A comprehensive understanding of the adaptive value of DVM can be attained only if the behaviour of individual fish within migrating populations is explicitly taken into account. Size, condition and reproductive value differ between individuals, suggesting that migrating populations should split into migrants and non-migrants for whom the balance between mortality risk and growth rate can differ. There is increasing evidence for this type of partial DVM within populations.

6. Whereas patterns of DVM are well documented, the evolution of DVM is still only poorly understood. Because experimental approaches at realistic natural scales remain difficult, a combination of comprehensive data sets with modelling is likely to resolve the relative importance of different proximate and ultimate causes behind DVM in fish.
Address
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0046-5070 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (up) 66
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Author Stamplecoskie, K.M.; Binder, T.R.; Lower, N.; Cottenie, K.; McLaughlin, R.L.; McDonald, D.G.
Title Response of Migratory Sea Lampreys to Artificial Lighting in Portable Traps Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication North American Journal of Fisheries Management Abbreviated Journal North American Journal of Fisheries Management
Volume 32 Issue 3 Pages 563-572
Keywords lampreys; Petromyzon marinus
Abstract This study evaluated responses by migratory spawning-phase sea lampreys Petromyzon marinus to artificial trap lighting in the laboratory and field with the aim of improving trapping as a method of sea lamprey control in the Laurentian Great Lakes. We hypothesized that lighting would improve trap success by increasing the attraction to, entrance into, or retention within portable sea lamprey traps. The responses of migratory sea lampreys to nocturnal lighting were complex and situation dependent. In the laboratory, where two traps were placed side by side, more sea lampreys were caught in the lit trap than in the unlit trap (80% versus 20%), largely because of increased attraction to the lit trap (75% of trap funnel entries by sea lampreys were in lit traps). In the field, where two traps were set 9 m apart and located against a barrier to upstream movement, there was no consistent difference in the numbers of sea lampreys caught in lit versus unlit traps. We provide two hypotheses for the variability in response to trap lighting between the laboratory and field, but overall the inconsistency of sea lamprey response to trap lighting leads us to conclude that the benefits of implementing trap lighting for sea lamprey control are limited. Lighting traps may be beneficial in situations where lighting is implemented in conjunction with other trap modifications that attract sea lampreys to within close proximity of traps or when traps are operated in stream locations that already encounter high volumes of sea lampreys.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0275-5947 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (up) 68
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Author Riley, W.D.; Bendall, B.; Ives, M.J.; Edmonds, N.J.; Maxwell, D.L.
Title Street lighting disrupts the diel migratory pattern of wild Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., smolts leaving their natal stream Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Aquaculture Abbreviated Journal Aquaculture
Volume 330-333 Issue Pages 74-81
Keywords Artificial light; Behaviour; Migration; Salmon; Smolt; Street lighting
Abstract The migratory timing and behaviour of wild Atlantic salmon smolts leaving their natal stream was determined using a passive integrated transponder (PIT) antennae system at a study site on a tributary of the River Itchen, England. Experiments compared the downstream migration of smolts under natural control conditions (2000–2006) with two years (2008 and 2009) when the main downstream exit of the study site was subject to street-lit conditions every alternate night (maximum light intensity measured at the stream surface = 14 lx). Migration of smolts under control conditions was significantly (p < 0.01, n = 170) correlated with sunset. By contrast, street lighting resulted in the timing of migration being random (p = 0.11, n = 7; p = 0.76, n = 34, respectively) with respect to time of day. Furthermore, migration of smolts was significantly (p = 0.01, n = 19) correlated with the time of sunset for fish migrating when the lamp had been off, but random (p = 0.36, n = 22) when the lamp had been on (2008 and 2009 data, combined). This alteration in migratory behaviour due to street lighting may impact fitness.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0044-8486 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (up) 69
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Author Takemura, A.; Ueda, S.; Hiyakawa, N.; Nikaido, Y.
Title A direct influence of moonlight intensity on changes in melatonin production by cultured pineal glands of the golden rabbitfish, Siganus guttatus Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication Journal of Pineal Research Abbreviated Journal J Pineal Res
Volume 40 Issue 3 Pages 236-241
Keywords Animals; Circadian Rhythm; *Light; Melatonin/biosynthesis/*secretion; *Moon; Organ Culture Techniques; Perciformes/*physiology; Pineal Gland/physiology/*radiation effects
Abstract Rabbitfish are a restricted lunar-synchronized spawner that spawns around a species-specific lunar phase. It is not known how the fish perceive changes in cues from the moon. One possible explanation is that rabbitfish utilize changes in moonlight intensity to establish synchrony. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether or not the pineal gland of the golden rabbitfish can directly perceive changes in moonlight intensity. Isolated pineal glands were statically cultured under natural or artificial light conditions and melatonin secreted into the culture medium was measured using a time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay. Under an artificial light/dark cycle, melatonin secretion significantly increased during the dark phase. Under continuous light conditions, melatonin secretion was suppressed, while culture under continuous dark conditions seemed to duplicate melatonin secretion corresponding to the light/dark cycle in which the fish were acclimated. When cultured pineal glands were kept under natural light conditions on the dates of the full and the new moon, small amounts of melatonin were secreted at night. Moreover, exposure of cultured pineal glands to artificial and natural light conditions resulted in a significant decrease of melatonin secretion within 2 hr. These results suggest that the isolated pineal gland of golden rabbitfish responds to environmental light cycles and that 'brightness' of the night moon has an influence on melatonin secretion from the isolated pineal gland.
Address Sesoko Station, Tropical Biosphere Research Center, University of the Ryukyus, Motobu, Okinawa, Japan. tilapia@lab.u-ryukyu.ac.jp
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-3098 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:16499560 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (up) 70
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