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Author Rodríguez, A.; Rodríguez, B.; Curbelo, Á.J.; Pérez, A.; Marrero, S.; Negro, J.J.; Katzner, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Factors affecting mortality of shearwaters stranded by light pollution: Mortality of shearwaters attracted by light pollution Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Animal Conservation Abbreviated Journal Anim Conserv  
  Volume 15 Issue 5 Pages 519-526  
  Keywords Cory's shearwater; Calonectris diomedea; birds; petrels; collisions; animals  
  Abstract Every year and across the world, thousands of fledglings of different petrel species crash into human structures because they are disorientated by artificial lights during their first flights. As this phenomenon is rather predictable, rescue campaigns are organized to help birds to reach the ocean, but unfortunately, a low proportion gets hurt or dies. Despite the huge number of affected individuals, and the fact that the problem was detected a long time ago, little is known on this source of mortality. We have studied the factors (i.e. body condition, plumage development, fledging date and sex) influencing the mortality of Cory's Shearwater Calonectris diomedea fledglings stranded inland due to light pollution in Tenerife (Canary Islands) during two consecutive breeding seasons (2009 and 2010). Late fledglings showed lower values of a body condition index than early ones. No sex biases were detected, neither considering stranded birds overall, nor for recovery dates or in the body condition of rescued fledglings. Our results indicate that late birds stranded by lights showing abundant down are more susceptible to fatal collisions and that the lights do not selectively kill birds with lower body condition indices. An enhancement of veterinary care should be done during the last part of the fledging period when more fatal collisions occur, especially focused on fledglings with abundant down. More research to determine why some individuals end up disoriented around artificial lights and others do not is urgently needed to minimize or prevent fallouts.  
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  ISSN 1367-9430 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (up) 55  
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Author Longcore, T.; Rich, C.; Gauthreaux, S.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Height, Guy Wires, And Steady-Burning Lights Increase Hazard Of Communication Towers To Nocturnal Migrants: A Review And Meta-Analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication The Auk Abbreviated Journal The Auk  
  Volume 125 Issue 2 Pages 485-492  
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  ISSN 0004-8038 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (up) 56  
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Author Cochran, W.W.; Mouritsen, H.; Wikelski, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Migrating songbirds recalibrate their magnetic compass daily from twilight cues Type Journal Article
  Year 2004 Publication Science (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Science  
  Volume 304 Issue 5669 Pages 405-408  
  Keywords *Animal Migration; Animals; Biological Clocks; Calibration; Cues; *Flight, Animal; Geography; *Magnetics; *Orientation; *Solar System; Songbirds/*physiology  
  Abstract Night migratory songbirds can use stars, sun, geomagnetic field, and polarized light for orientation when tested in captivity. We studied the interaction of magnetic, stellar, and twilight orientation cues in free-flying songbirds. We exposed Catharus thrushes to eastward-turned magnetic fields during the twilight period before takeoff and then followed them for up to 1100 kilometers. Instead of heading north, experimental birds flew westward. On subsequent nights, the same individuals migrated northward again. We suggest that birds orient with a magnetic compass calibrated daily from twilight cues. This could explain how birds cross the magnetic equator and deal with declination.  
  Address Illinois Natural History Survey, 607 East Peabody Drive, Champaign, IL61820, USA. Sparrow@springnet1.com  
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  ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:15087541 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (up) 57  
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Author Wiltschko, W.; Munro, U.; Ford, H.; Wiltschko, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Red light disrupts magnetic orientation of migratory birds Type Journal Article
  Year 1993 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature  
  Volume 364 Issue 6437 Pages 525-527  
  Keywords magnetoreception; birds; animals  
  Abstract The transduction mechanisms and the neurophysiological basis of magnetoreception in birds are still largely unexplained, even though the role of the magnetic compass in the orientation of birds is fairly well understood. The discussion on magnetoreception in birds and terrestrial vertebrates focuses mainly on two mechanisms: small particles of magnetite and biochemical bi-radical reactions of excited macromolecules. When the bi-radical hypothesis was first proposed, magnetic resonance phenomena in the retina were suggested as the primary processes, which led to the question of whether magnetoreception was light-dependent. Homing experiments and electrophysiological evidence from pigeons have produced evidence consistent with such a mechanism. An effect of the spectral composition of light on magnetic compass orientation in amphibians has recently been described: under blue light of 450 nm and below, newts oriented as they did under the full spectrum, whereas they showed a roughly 90° counterclockwise shift when tested under wavelengths at or above 500 nm. Here we report the first orientation tests on migratory birds under light of different wavelengths; the results suggest a light-dependent process that appears to differ from that reported in newts.  
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  ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (up) 58  
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Author Smit, B.; Boyles, J.G.; Brigham, R.M.; McKechnie, A.E. url  doi
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  Title Torpor in dark times: patterns of heterothermy are associated with the lunar cycle in a nocturnal bird Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of Biological Rhythms Abbreviated Journal J Biol Rhythms  
  Volume 26 Issue 3 Pages 241-248  
  Keywords Animals; *Biological Clocks; Birds/*physiology; *Body Temperature Regulation; Ecosystem; *Feeding Behavior; Insects; *Moon; Seasons; South Africa  
  Abstract Many studies have shown that endotherms become more heterothermic when the costs of thermoregulation are high and/or when limited energy availability constrains thermoregulatory capacity. However, the roles of many ecological variables, including constraints on foraging opportunities and/or success, remain largely unknown. To test the prediction that thermoregulatory patterns should be related to foraging opportunities in a heterothermic endotherm, we examined the relationship between the lunar cycle and heterothermy in Freckled Nightjars (Caprimulgus tristigma), which are visually orienting, nocturnal insectivores that are dependent on ambient light to forage. This model system provides an opportunity to assess whether variation in foraging opportunities influences the expression of heterothermy. The nightjars were active and foraged for insects when moonlight was available but became inactive and heterothermic in the absence of moonlight. Lunar illumination was a much stronger predictor of the magnitude of heterothermic responses than was air temperature (T(a)). Our data suggest that heterothermy was strongly related to variation in foraging opportunities associated with the lunar cycle, even though food abundance appeared to remain relatively high throughout the study period. Patterns of thermoregulation in this population of Freckled Nightjars provide novel insights into the environmental and ecological determinants of heterothermy, with the lunar cycle, and not T(a), being the strongest predictor of torpor use.  
  Address DST/NRF Centre of Excellence at the Percy FitzPatrick Institute, Department of Zoology and Entomology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa. smitbe@gmail.com  
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  ISSN 0748-7304 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:21628551 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (up) 59  
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